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delta november

Pilots = Second most dangerous job??...

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I came across an article at MSN homepage that describes a study conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS0). Apparently, aircraft pilots and flight engineers have the second most dangerous job (i.e., almost at the top of the list for dying at ones job). Specifically the article indicated: 2. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers Fatalities: 92.4 per 100,000 employed Median pay: $129,250

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As the article stated-there is a difference between major air carriers statistics and "commercial pilots"/aircraft they fly. I am a commercial pilot-but only fly my GA aircraft-as are many commercial pilots I know. There are also crop dusters, aerial photo, glider towers, traffic copters, powerline flyers,small charter/cargo operations etc. A statistic the article doesn't mention is that majority of flying hours every year are not the big "commercial airliners" but Ga aviation aircraft.So yes-for major commercial carriers-their "commercial pilots" (and passengers)have probably one of the safest occupations/rides.For the majority of "commercial pilots" out there who are actually flying other types of aircraft in much less routine environments-not as safe. Kinda shows how statistics can mean anything depending on how you use them.http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpg

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I think "SIMMING",is by far the most dangerous endeavor one can participate in.Far more so than crab harvesting out there in the Bering sea.You see, its effects are insidious,like carbon monoxide gas,the more you get involved with it, the less your chance of surviving.The other hazard is more immediate,a wife can reek havoc on the affected simmer.(Wife, a small shrilly instrument that rhymes with Fife")Also, that "shutthedamthingoffites" is usually fatal.There are other virus which are painful,tho no less fatal,one is,the "WE" factor. WE meaning "them"."WE" don't do nothing no mo! "WE" never talk no mo!"WE DON'T go any where no mo! We has an ally ,Its called "YOUDONTDONUTTINGNOMOITIS" " You don't do nothing any mo! you don't do nothing but sit there "PLAYING with your self!You don't do nothing but send notes to strangers .Dangerous I think, I rather be a test pilot in a broom factory than to be a simmer. I even hear they get their fingers caught in refrig doors in the middle of the nite feeling for a beer,when they scream,no one hears them.But worse thing of all I heard is they fall of their chairs.They tempt the fate by not buckling up.Some of these simmers like to live on the edge however. As far as I'm concerned I prefer skydiving,much safer!! VIN :+

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Does the statistics also take into account that many of those pilots that get killed actually get killed during their spare time flying warbirds and light aircraft for fun?I've seen such statistics for many jobs that didn't differentiate for accidents happening on the workfloor and accidents happening outside office hours, leading to (probably purposely) inflated statistics.For example traffic accidents were listed as work related, as were sporting injuries obtained during the weekend and evening.

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Donny AKA ShalomarFly 2 ROCKS!!!To stay "on the job", a comercial pilot must pass rigorous medicals. So many of them are grounded and are at another job or retired long before they die of natural causes, which I suspect is inflating the statistics. Also, is a pilot on layover, driving thru an unfamiliar or high crime city "on the job"? Flight crews with airlines that have solid maintenance usually regard the trip to the hotel as the most dangerous part of the trip.Medevac helicopters have the highest civil attrirtion rate as of a few years ago.I suspect how "on the job" is factored in has a big effect on these actuarials. Fishing and farming used to rank much higher, when deaths across a certain profession were examined. I suspect certain professions with a culture of limited exercise and not valuing personal health (not mentioning names) would do much worse if off the job deaths were factored in.I find it hard to believe cabbies in New York City or truck drivers are really that much safer. Though truck drivers ranking higher than limo and taxi drivers is no surprise.Best Regards, Donny:-wave

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Actually-again I am a "commercial pilot" and I only have to pass a 3rd class medical which is the most basic and not hard at all to pass because I do not exercise my commercial rights (e.g. to charge money to fly).When most people talk "commercial" they are usually refering to big airline drivers for major cariers-however I suspect the majority of those who hold "commercial" ratings do none of that.Atp-that is another story......however the news story and statistics were about "commercial" -not atp.http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpg

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Well Folks; For what its worth; I went to the "source" the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The figures do not include off the job deaths, nor deathson the job from heart attack ect. The fatal incidents are grouped as follows; 1. Transportation 2. Assualts-Violent acts 3. Contact with objects/equipment 4. Exposure to harmful substances/enviroments 5. Fires and explosions By industry it shows a total of 109 deaths for "Air Transport"broken down as; Airline 22 and commercial 87. In another table they further qualify it as Scheduled Passenger 5,scheduled freight 8. The remainder are charter ect. All are listedin the "Transportation" column. For Heavy and Tractor trailer drivers it looks as follows; Total769; Transportation 509, Assualt/violent act 14, object/equipmentcontact 90, falls 32, Hazardous substance 24. Greetings from Charlotte NC:-wave Denny

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