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flight planning question

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lets say Im planning a flight from KMIA to KJFK (fairly long distance), I set up my SID, enroute waypoints, STARs etc. I check the weather report on KMIA, will I need weather report for all the stations along my path??regardless I'm flying, I need to start my descent, with the X times 3 rule of thumb, adding 1 or nm for every 10 knots of tail wind, How can I determine the wind when flying? What if the conditions have changed since I departed or there is no weather reporting station available?If using the only real time weather that I know of FS METEO, the ATIS report in the airport will reflect those changes??Please all oppinions are welcome, I'm learning and I m trying to fly "as real as I can" within the limitations of the SIM

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Gabriel, In the real world, if you were flying IFR from MIA to JFK, ATC would tell you when to go down. You don't need a rule of thumb at all. If you were flying VFR, use your ground speed to calculate when to start your descent. The DME or the GPS will give you that. In any event, the real weather function in FS or FSMeteo will give you the weather from the nearest reporting point to your location. They include the winds aloft, I believe, and you can calculate whatever wind vectors you want from them.Bob--

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>In the real world, if you were flying IFR from MIA to JFK, ATC would >tell you when to go down. You don't need a rule of thumb at all. real world ATC would give crossing restrictions. Cross this waypoint at 10000.Then you would need a rule of thumb.

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Gabriel,Two suggestions: post this question in the new flight planning forum, and check this site: www.fltplan.com. The site will give you the winds at the various points along your route, and even suggest optimal flight altitude. I've seen it so that ATC tells you to descend at a certain point, and also where they give you a crossing restriction (be at a certain altitude at a particular point in your flight). In the second case, they normally give you enough time to confortably descend and meet the restrictions.Regards,Dave

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Tnx for info, lets see how it works...........

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Nice thing about a crossing restriction is you get the planning back in the cockpit instead of behind the scope. A PD(pilot's discretion) descent is a tool we us to maintain as much efficency as we can get to reduce the cost of the flight.Winds aloft generally can be found on INS/FMC/NavDisplay and it gets to be voodoo at that point.Timothy

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