Sign in to follow this  
Guest harry3

Problem: Beechjet engines in rain showers

Recommended Posts

Hi!Everytime I cross a front with the Beechjet, the engines "die".I've turned "engine failures" off and Anti Ice is on, but the engines still turn off in heavy rain.This looks like a bug of FU3, is there a way to fix this?Regards,Harry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

It's not a bug. Beachjest's engines don't like heavy showers. You have to avoid heavy rains.B.Adamski

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And there is really no option to turn that off?(via a kind of a *.cfg !?)(because the real engines have no problems with heavy rain)Because today, the rain wasn't even strong(it was a warm front).Regards,Harry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harry,I assume that the real Beechjet's engines actually DO have a problem with heavy rain. Anyway, I think that you need to have the igniters switched to ON, and maybe also the boost pumps.Chris Low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris,That's correct on both counts. Here's what the Honorable Peter James said in his article about the Beechjet on that score, found at http://www.flightsim.com/cgi/kds?$=main/special/bj400a.htm Flameouts!The real BeechJet 400A has flameout tendencies in heavy rain, turbulence and crosswinds.>>>SECRET #2<<< The FU3 version produces rapid engine flameouts or failures during flight through moderate to heavy rain (green or yellow on the radar unit), severe turbulence (so in a thunderstorm, you'll get that and the rain!) and crosswinds on the runway! Wow! That's a lot of things to keep track of. So, to protect you against surprise engine failures (so many people who were testing in our office kept telling me something's wrong with the jet. They kept loosing their engines, and kept telling me it's defective!) Little did they know. How many of you simmers knew this, or experienced engine failures? Here's what you need to prevent this from occurring: * Run your ignition during areas of moderate or heavier rain, expected turbulence, and any crosswinds you're going to hit on a landing or takeoff. * Run your boost pumps during actual turbulence Hope that helps, Seadog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi!Thanks for your answers!@Seadog: I'll try today. @Christopher: I'm pretty sure that the real engines do not flame out that much in heavy rain.I've once seen in TV that the engine factories squirt the engines with really MUCH water, and they don't flame out.The Beechjet is an IFR plane, and as such a plane, it should be able to fly in IFR conditions.But I've read the notes of the Bj400 programmer, so it's a bit of reality too. But once again, I don't think that the engine will flame out that easily.Regards,Harry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Harry,Yes, I agree that the Beechjet engines should not flame out as much as they do in FU3. If the REAL plane acted like this, then you can be sure that I wouldn't set foot in one !Chris Low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're all ignoring the fact that Peter James was a pilot himself, and extensively tested the Beechjet during modelling. Most real pilots would follow procedures to avoid flameouts, so it would not be common in practise, by avoiding intense rain, crosswinds, dives etc. I have flown through intense rain in the Beechjet many times without problems, and it behaves perfectly unless I take it outside its envelope. But if I fly into a thunderstorm, or dive too hard etc, it flames out and I assume this is correct. Chris, you'll have to give up flying!RobD.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I concur, if this is the way it is in real life I wouldn't want it any other way. We've tested all kinds of horrifying weather files in FU3 and some are simply not flyable. But then, if real aircraft avoid these kinds of extreme weather FU3 illustrates why.Regarding thunderstorms, keep in mind that a jet will fly above them during cruise. Hence, extreme weather will rarely affect a jet except during take-off and landing. (Real jet pilots don't cruise around at 2,000 ft). Further, torrents of rain and thunderstorms tend to be rather local phenomena, meaning that a nearby airport may constitute a safe alternative.The main weather issue with GA aircraft is icing. The planes will tend to fly high enough to avoid it during cruise but not always. However, when one descends below the cloud ceiling to land that's the most critical phase. Wise real-life pilots avoid dangerous weather by choosing alternative airports.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this