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Radar Contact & Transponders...

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I've used RC v3.1 with FS2002 and it worked fine. I've upgraded to FS9 and RC still works fine, but I've come across a problem with transponders. I like to fly the older vintage planes in FS9, such as the DC3, but this stock aircraft has no transponder. Departure control in RC just keeps telling me "I'm not receiving your transponder....." over and over again. Is there a work around or solution to be able to fly these vintage aircraft in FS9 on IFR flights in Radar Contact?Any help would be appreciated. Great job on Radar Contact! I'm a commuter airline pilot in RL and RC is, as microsoft says, as real as it gets. Great product.Thanks

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good question. first time this has been raised. don't you have to have a transponder to be in the pca?surely there is a way to add a transponder gauge to your panel.let me ponder a solutionjd

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There might be some instances in non-US areas where DC-3 flying might still occur where the ground station does not have the capability of transponder queries.In RL in 1972 I went to land in VFR conditions in an IFR equipped SE aircraft. The controller asked me to do right hand turns for identification. I offered to squawk an ID but he told me he was not equipped for transponder interpretation. This was as I recall in Toledo, Ohio, and he stated they would not budget a scope update for a couple of more years.It is probably mandatory in the US now, but perhaps "crate flying" in sparse areas with older ground equipment still exists in other countries.While not frequent, perhaps RC could issue the turns for ID request and monitor the planes headings for ID turns and internally tag it for such situations. It would be on the controller or options menu.Think I've been watching too many older movies.

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Ron,For several years, and especially since 9/11, almost no one gets into the air without a mode C transponder anymore in the PCA or anywhere near an upper-class airport. One doesn't leave Boulder Muni without it. Still too close to DIA.

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Actually, I recall the intro of the Mode C in the 70's, right? Besides altitude and ID, what data is transmitted just to satisfy my curiousity.Also, for some time, there was some discussion of yet another extended mode. Is that still in progress or are we talking about the private data channel.

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Besides altitude and ID, what data is transmitted?That's it for Modes A and CAlso, for some time, there was some discussion of yet another extended mode. Is that still in progress...I guess you're refering to Mode S. The technology has been around for some years now. I don't know what's happening in the US but in Europe, many commercial aircraft have been fitted with Mode S transponders for some time and the European Joint Aviation Authorities (JAA) have issued a directive mandating its carriage in the near future.One of the major advantages of Mode S transponders is that they're selectively addressable by the interrogator - each transponder has its own 24-bit unique address, giving 16,777,216 possible codes. This overcomes a major limitation of the current Mode A/C transponders which have an absolute limitation of only 4096 codes available.In Europe, the transition period for the introduction of what is known as Elementary Mode S Surveillance began last year over Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Switzerland and will be complete by early 2005. That will be followed by Mode S Enhanced Surveillance when the UK, France and Germany will start to make use of additional data from Mode S transponders. Known as DAPs, (downlinked aircraft paramaters) this data will include: Altitude Reporting (in 25ft increments)Magnetic HeadingIndicated AirspeedRate of TurnVertical RateTrue Track AngleGround SpeedSelected Altitude Currently, many of those parameters need to be established by ATC during radar vectoring by RT - having them available directly will reduce RT congestion considerably. The 'Selected Altitude' feature will also be a major safety contribution by enabling controllers to cross-check descent and/or climb clearances have been properly understood - "level busts" are still a worryingly-high cause of aircraft incidents.Finally, Mode S transponders are also an advantage when used with TCAS. During a TCAS encounter, if both aircraft are Mode S transponder-equipped, the escape manoeuvres can be co-ordinated directly between the 2 systems using the selective address feature. ACAS II (Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems) Phase 2 will become mandatory in Europe in January 2005 and will require the carriage of TCAS II (vers 7) and a Mode S transponder.Pete

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With DAPS it looks like ground stations and sophisticated airborne TCAS will be able to establish trends and measure the response of conflicting aircraft for almost automatic reponse and resolution.I suppose eventually after observation in Europe, getting mandated elsewhere will eventually spread.

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