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Guest cirurgiao

About TRANSITION LEVEL & TRANSITION ALTITUDE

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Hi, as a newcomer to FS9 & Radar Contact v4, I'm learning something new. I really don't understand the significance and what it implies of transition altitude & level.I've read the rcv4 manual but don't get it.Thanks for any helpcirurgiao

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Hi,With respect if you don't understand the manual then I don't think you will understand how I explain it.Being new to both programs presents you will a huge learning curve. You might be better getting toi grips with the basic principles of flying an aircraft and navigating before getting involved with RC4.I'm sure you understand parts of the manual so if you can post specific questions I'll do my best to explain or point you to the relevant bit in the manual.To start with what airports are you flying from and to? The FAA area (the US) has totally different rules to non-FAA (most of the rest of the world).Help us to help you :-)Cheers,

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Thanks for answering so soon. I have been flying inside the USA and sometimes in Europe. What I don't understand is this:I planned a flight from Meigs to Minneapolis with a Dreamfleet Cessna 310 (my favorite plane). I understand almost every comm that rcv4 controller give in-flight. I need to know if a transition level & altitude will affect my flight.Another observation: very interesting those add-ons in the end of your message. How do you get it if its possible to explain?

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hey,lets see if I can explain in plain english...It's my understanding that in the States transition alititude is FL180 (18,000ft) (someone correct me if I'm wrong). I am in Europe, here each airport has it's own transition alititude...this can be picked up on the airports ATIS along with it's weather.When you are above the transition alititude you must set your altimeter setting to the standard QNH (29.92 inches of mercury in US, 1013 HPa or millebars everywhere else).this ensures that every aircraft above the transition alititude is reading their correct altitude. Altitude is based on air pressure and the 29.92 setting makes sure that every aircraft is on the same setting thus ensuring they are keeping to the alititude specified in their flight plan or by ATC at the time. (play around with your altimeter setting in FS and watch how your altitude varies).When you are below the transition altitude you are normally in a control zone of some sort (ie under the control of the airport in question, therefore you set your altimeter to the current QNH setting to give you your correct reading ASL (above sea level), again this ensures that all aircraft below the transition altitude in the control zone have the correct readings on their altitude.This is neccessary because say you were doing an approach to an airport, you would know the altitude of the runway threshold in question, when you set your altimeter to the QNH below transition altitude this ensure that your altimeter will read this altitude when you are at the runways threshold, vital for any sort of IAP approach.Sorry I got kinda technical towards the end but hopefully you get the drift...drift, now there's a whole new discussion right there....Alan

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Hi Alan,Thanks for explaining that in layman's terms. Just a couple of small corrections...<>Transition Altitudes would always be expressed as an altitude and not a flight level. So 18,000ft is correct but FL180 isn't ;-)<>You can't be below the Transition Altitude - only below the Transition Level.For the poster's benefit benefit the vital command to listen out for is "Altimeter Check". When you hear that when climbing set the altimeter to standard pressure - 29.92 or 1013.2. When you hear it during the descent switch to QNH.Cheers,

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Hi,Hopefully Alan's reply will have helped your understanding of Transition Altitudes and Transition Levels.I think you were referring to my signature. You can change yours by selecting User Menu / Edit Your Profile in the main AvSim Forum area.Cheers,

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Ray,you wrote: "You can't be below the Transition Altitude - only below the Transition Level."But...when you're climbing out from an airport, you're always below transition altitude (your altimeter is set at the local QNH) till you pass thru that and change the altimeter to the standard.Regards

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Hi Enrico,You're quite right. My apologies to Alan. I believe it's called a brain f*rt :-(Cheers,

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Hi Ray,I think you just did a very minor mistake...Regards

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Hi,As far as I know it's quite simple:During CLIMB (after take off) transition ALTITUDE is used. When passing this altitude, you set your altimeter to QNE (1013/29.92).Above this, altitudes are refered to in FL (Flight Level) instead of FEET.During DESCEND the transition LEVEL is used. Above the transition level your altimeter was set to 1013/29.92 (QNE), when descending through the transition level, you set your altimeter (back) to local pressure (QNH). Below this, altitudes are refered to in FEET, instead of FL.

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but, I think its another rules regarding FL and feet in the USA.correct me if I am wrong ;)-Anders-

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Hi everybody.I'd like to say thanks to everyone of you who made my dumb question an important one. I've learned a lot about RC community. I hope my next question didn't seem so dumb.

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It's often said that the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked.Enjoy your flights with your new-found knowledge! :-beerchugCheers,

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Every countrys' TA and TL is different. Does anyone have a site where different country's TA and TL are available?

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Does anyone have a site where different country's TA and TL are available?We in the RC beta team were never able to find a single site listing all the world's Transition Altitudes - we had to do it the hard way.The authoritative source for such information is each country's Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP) and more and more of these AIPs are becoming available on-line. Unfortunately, many countries do not have a single TA but one which varies from airport to airport so a more-usable source is probably the approach and/or departure charts for individual airports - there are now many sites on the Internet offering these charts.Transition Levels, however, are a different kettle of fish because, in the vast majority of cases, the TL is a calculated value based on the TA and the current pressure and so can't be published in advance. I say, "in the vast majority of cases" because, as with everything in this world, there are exceptions to this rule and a few countries - New Zealand springs to mind - have both a fixed TA and a fixed TL! (The fixed TL situation is not simulated in this version of RC and all TLs are calculated.)As far as Radar Contact goes, the TAs the program is using are shown on the "Controller Info" page after you've loaded your flight plan. Once you've clicked "Start RC" the calculated TLs RC will be using are shown briefly on the advdisp display or you can refer back to the "Controller Info" page where this data also now appears below the TAs. Probably the most complete list of TAs in one place is in the file that RC uses although I wouldn't vouch for its complete accuracy. You'll find it in the RC4data directory in the file m4.csv. Open this file with only Notepad or a similar text editor and NOT Excel or other spreadsheet! You'll find the TA as the last figure against each airport - non-US airports for which we couldn't find a TA have the US 18,000ft as a default.Pete

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Basically in the US it's the same, only US has fixed TA/TL (18.000ft / FL180) where as in Europe TA/TL depends per country/airport.

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