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Guest aca_dia

Gosh, I feel stupid for asking but here goes.....

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In regards to wind direction in METAR's, would the wind direction given as 15006KT mean that the wind is blowing "FROM" 150 degrees at 06 KTS or "TO" 150 degrees at KTS. If you're a visual person like me, here are a couple of shot to help:"FROM"http://ftp.avsim.com/dcforum/User_files/3d35ee834927676b.jpg"TO"http://ftp.avsim.com/dcforum/User_files/3d35eea149882adb.jpgThank you so very much for helping me through this troubled tim :-lolMike

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Hi Mike,Here's an excerpt from the Federal Meteorological Handbook.5.3 Wind Parameters As used in this chapter, wind is the horizontal motion of the air past a given point and includes:a. Direction. The direction, in tens of degrees, from which the wind is blowing.b. Speed. The rate, in knots, at which the wind passes a given point.c. Gusts. The description of the variability of the wind speed.d. Peak wind speed. The maximum instantaneous wind speed measured.e. Wind Shift. A change in wind direction.The full FMH may be found here:http://205.156.54.206/oso/oso1/oso12/fmh1/fmh1toc.htmHope that helps!:-waveMike CollierKPHX[table border=1 bgcolor=#eeeeee][tr][td rowspan=2] http://avsim.com/flightdeck/images/Radar_small.gif[/td][td] America West Airlines and proud to be a Beta Tester of[link:www.jdtllc.com]Radar Contact]The premiere ATC adventure add-on for FS

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And "knots" is such a useful everyday term that they might as well say "cranberries". :-) (it actually works out to fathoms per hour; each "knot" being a fathom in length). In the ancient balloon days they used furlongs per fortnight. ;-)

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Just as an addendum, when you read a METAR (Aerodeome surface observation report), TAF(Terminal Aerodrome Forecast), or FD(Winds Aloft Forecast), the winds given are in reference to true north, not magnetic north. Runways and courses flown by aircraft are referenced to magnetic north. You have to apply the magnetic variation for whatever area you're in to convert from true to magnetic.As far as I know, the only times that winds are given in reference to magnetic north is in an ATIS or ASOS broadcast.Regards,Scott (KJMS)

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A very good point. And the variation can be great.

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"(it actually works out to fathoms per hour; each "knot" being a fathom in length)"Help me out with this one. How are you connecting fathoms with knots? (perhaps I missed some humor)Knot = nautical miles per hour = about 1.15 statute miles per hour.A traditional fathom is about six feet and has no connection to the spacing of knots (when measured with a chip log from a vessel) ;)

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