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bob34

NAT SLOP Procedures

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Was wondering of the FSX 744 was capable of flying a 1-2nm offset from the centerline on a NAT track. It's a procedure I'd like to practice flying back and forth over the Atlantic.Can't seem to find anything specific in the FMC manual regarding this. If it's there, just point me in the right direction and I'll figure it out. If not, that's fine, I'll stop looking.Thanks...For those not familiar with the SLOP procedure, here it is.Strategic Lateral Offset Procedures (SLOP)SLOP was created to reduce the risk of collision. SLOP involves the selection of offsets to the right of the cleared track and it is to be used as a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) in the NAT Region. Random distribution of aircraft on and to the right of the centre line is key to compensating for the extremely accurate navigation capabilities of modern aircraft. This accuracy creates a situation where aircraft can be at immediate risk of collision if there is an unintended loss of vertical separation between flights following the same or reciprocal tracks.By allowing pilots to randomly select to fly either 1 or 2 nautical miles (nm) right of the centre line, SLOP also incorporates wake turbulence avoidance procedures.Although some NAT aircraft operators have successfully implemented this procedure as a SOP, there is still relatively little uptake on the part of the majority of NAT aircraft operators. Since the aircraft without automatic offset capability must fly the centre line, those that are capable are strongly encouraged to fly an offset of one or two nm right of the centre line.In practical terms:1. if your aircraft can be programmed to fly an offset, fly a one nm or a two nm offset to the right of the centre line2. being random is key to the procedure - follow your company

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Bob:Absolutely! During the cruise segment (non departure/arrival) there is an OFFSET prompt at LSK 6R on the CDU. Just enter a LXX or RXX and you will see the new offset track. Entering a 0 deletes the selected offset. I'd recommend (as Bill Bulfer and the Oasis video does) going into heading select before execution, making the gradual transition and then re-engaging LNAV. There is a much lower probability of spilling Champagne in First that way :)!As long as you are within airway corridor constraints- there is no ATC issue, and theoretically greater safety margins.Best-Carl F. Avari-Cooper BAW0225http://online.vatsimindicators.net/980091/523.png

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Perfect! Thank you Carl! I know just where that is...See you on the NATS - or just to the right! :)

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