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Yesterday, I was at my course from Athens to Paris and, somewhere over the Alpes, my aircraft started to stall. I don

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If this was a prop plane.. did you adjust engine mixture as you gained altitude?If not, you lose power and your plane will stall if on autopilot..

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Bert, It was a 767 plane. I was at about 30,000 miles of altitude. How can I adjust the engine mixture?Mario.

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30,000 miles??????? How's the Moon this time of year? :-lolSeriously though, there's no mixture to adjust on the 767. That applies only to prop planes. I presume you were flying the POSKY 767 with full tanks and lost a lot of airspeed during climb. Make sure you don't load too much fuel (this will keep your weight down). Try to keep your airspeed around 270-290kt IAS during climb, adjusting your rate of climb accordingly, but never dropping below 500ft/min. If you can't climb with at least 500ft/min cruise at a lower altitude until you've burned off more fuel, before proceeding to a higher cruise level. MK

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This really doesn't involve your question, but I had a stall problem yesterday. I was on short final, radar altimiter reading 1300 when the stick shaker(just a sound in FS), started rattling my brains out. I quickly disengaged the autothrottle, applied full power. No harm done, total altitude loss of < 100 ft. However, once I ascertained the facts, I realized I was flying at 131 knots(my approact speed as indicated by the FMC), with 5* of flaps extended!! When I applied full flaps, all was good.Clear Skies

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Ok, MK, you got me! My altitude was 30,000 feet.I think you discovered something I didn

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sounds like you didn't have your pitot heat on. of course, once you start a stall at high altitude, it's too late.

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What does pitot heat have to do with a stall? Pitot heat only effects the functionality of the instruments. The airplane will fly without them. In any event, are we talking aerodynamic stall -- in which the air flowing over the wing separates because the wing exceeds its maximum angle of attack -- or engine failure?

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I don't know Bob. But it looks like an aerodynamic stall and not an engine failure. In fact, my plane started to point its nose up, but the altitude did not increased. And then, when I least expected, it started to STALL... I was in the middle of the course. And there was nothing I could do, but I tried... almost everything.

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"....somewhere over the Alpes, my aircraft started to stall...."Most times when this happens, it's one of two causes. Sometimes the airspeed readout is set for true airspeed, rather than indicated. If you were using the autothrottle to maintain, say a 280kt climbout speed, you would come very close to stalling if the autothrottle was maintaining the speed based on true airspeed.Another way this can happen is if you're using real weather, and you suddenly pick up a 100kt tailwind. Could be just enough temporary loss of airspeed for the stall to happen.And last, you could end up in a profile where your rate of climb was too much, given the a/c weight and altitude. It doesn't take much to get behind the curve.... -John

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not having pitot heat on may cause the airspeed indicator to indicate a speed higher than the real speed. This was the cause of a real life 727 crash many years ago, the pilot was departing and thought he was in an updraft and kept pulling up until he stalled. For details see http://aviation-safety.net/database/1974/741201-1.htmIf you were on autopilot the same effect could still happen of course because the autopilot depends on the same instrument systems.BevanNZKK

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>not having pitot heat on may cause the airspeed indicator to >indicate a speed higher than the real speed. This was the >cause of a real life 727 crash many years ago, the pilot was >departing and thought he was in an updraft and kept pulling >up until he stalled. For details see >http://aviation-safety.net/database/1974/741201-1.htm >>If you were on autopilot the same effect could still happen >of course because the autopilot depends on the same >instrument systems. >>Bevan >NZKK BUT - does FS2002 simulate this kind of thing?Barry

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I"ll try and test it tonight, I know a while back in FS2000 days I left it off and had strange effects with the Airspeed Indicator.BevanNZKK

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Over the Alps I once had a sudden loss of altitude probably due to low pressure under my wings. I was flying FL310 when my 767 suddenly started to fall horizontaly (no nose down or anything) then I hit the B key to correct my altimeter settings, the pressure had gone from 2992 to around 1800! Maybe a glitch in FS? Happened leaving LOWS in a flight to LIMC... fortunately my passengers just experienced a zero gravity environment for a few seconds and survived. lol

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I know there certainly was a documented bug with this in FS2000, probably caused by erronious Metar data which the sim didn't compensate for i.e. some minimum pressure needed to be built in. I don't know if it has been fixed in FS2002 or not.BevanNZKK

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