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I want to do better night landings and ILS approaches what tips can you pilots give me?

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practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice .........;)

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Regarding the ILS, 1. set a pitch attitude2. trim3. crosscheck4. adjustTrim the aircraft so it flys the glidepath by itself, if you're flying the approach at 130 kts trim for about 600 fpm to start, and make small corrections.The VSI is a great instrument, use it.

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That is what I was doing wrong do you have a ILS frequency that I can practice?

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>I want to do better night landings and ILS approaches what >tips can you pilots give me? Like some others have said, PRACTICE!Seriously, the key success factor to a good day, night or ILS landing is a stabilized approach. Capture your target approach speed, trim away control pressures and make fine adjustments on your way down the glideslope with minor inputs of power and pitch.

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I agree with all this sage advice, and would only add that you should start off your practice in singles and light twins, then move onto the airliners. I find that using the autothrottle initially helps ease the workload a little, especially when you're learning. You have to disengage it though in close, usually when you have a visual of the runway threshold or the VASI glideslope lights to the left of the runway. Practice makes perfect, and I now fly all of my ILS approaches by hand, day or night, IMC or clear skies. Plus, its much more fun than the autopilot.Alex ChristoffN562ZMinneapolis, MNThermobulb@aol.com

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may i add my $.02 worth?, there is a flight instruction section that will help. even after flying the "heavy iron" some c152 instruction can't hurt. tom t

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I believe i need alot more then a few hours of instruction more like a few months of instruction

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All the flight instruction in the world will only be as good as the flight model of the particular aircraft you want to fly. There are a few nice one's out there, freeware too, like the POSKY 767-300's. They handle well, are very stable on approach, and respond nicely to trim and power and low-speed flight adjustments. There are many more as I'm sure people will tell you. But start with the cessna (fixed gear) and transition up through a twin, the 737, and then the heavies like the 75, 76, or 777. Don't start off trying to learn night IFR in the 747-400. You'll be frustrated very quickly as you really have to stay ahead of the aircraft there and she'll stall on you and drop out of the sky in a second. A real beast to handle but really fun to fly when you get your chops down.Enjoy!Alex ChristoffN562ZMinneapolis, MNThermobulb@aol.com

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Alex I agree with you on that the flight model has to be absolutely perfect or near perfect and it is very important to build the best flight model possible P.S Alex if you want to just talk or share some pictures or videos just look me up on aim my screen name is verticalvelocit

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