Sign in to follow this  
CraigC

Lear crash in Astoria OR

Recommended Posts

This morning a Lear on take off role hit an elk. The 4 people on board got out safely. Plane burst into flames. I guess up here in the Pacific NW run that risk.John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Such dangers are certainly not limited to that region. Deer and other animals are a problem at many airports. There was a deer-airplane accident at Chicago-Lake in the Hills airport last year. Who knows how many times animals have caused problems that resulted in only a go-around, aborted takeoff, or hard brakes on landing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is deer danger at KMCO as well! Read the airport NOTAMS for KMCO and you'll notice that they have warnings about deers. A Delta L-1011 hit one once on takeoff roll and the darn thing made it in pieces, stuck to the front gear of the L-1011, giving the ground crew in KATL a nice disgusting surprise when they arrived at the gate.Sincerely,Dennis D. Mullerthttp://www.aavirtual.com/images/aav48_banner.gif[/img]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad everyone got out safely. Now, did they all have elk fritters over an open flame.Yeah, Dennis, but be thankful that Florida deer are only as big as a great dane and not your Pennsylvania big boys!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was in the Air Force I was a C-130 Flight Engineer, stationed at Little Rock AFB, Ar. There is a large deer population on the base with runway incursions quite common. One night while landing, just as the nose wheel touched the runway we saw the 10 point buck standing broadside right on centerline of "his runway". We hit him at about 100 knots with the left main gear, destroying him and the main gear door. The runway was closed for over an hour as there was about a 150 yard debris field for the sweeper truck to clean up. The largest piece of the deer they found was maybe twice the size of a football.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was on a dual flight during my PPL traning. We were flying over to Accomack on the Eastern Shore of VA at dusk. On roll out, 4 huge buck ran across the runway about 500 feet ahead of us. Luckily, we were pretty slow, but it still if it had been a few minutes later and darker, it could have been trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is an actual job that people have to control the animals at airports. Everything from Mammals to Birds. They are a real hazard to airports.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I work for an airline and we had a EMB-120 hit a deer on landing i am posting the NTSB record of it.David OgdenPP SEL InstFlight AttendantNYC01LA054On December 6, 2000, at 2038 eastern standard time, an Embraer 120RT, N504AS, operating as Atlantic Southeast Airlines flight 71, was substantially damaged when it collided with deer during landing roll-out at Yeager Airport (CRW), Charleston, West Virginia. The 3-person crew and 15 passengers were uninjured, and 1 passenger received serious injuries. The accident occurred at night, during visual meteorological conditions. An instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, between The William B. Hartsfield Atlanta International Airport (ATL), Atlanta, Georgia, and Yeager Airport. The scheduled passenger flight was conducted under 14 CFR Part 121.According to the captain, within seconds of landing on runway 23, the airplane struck two deer. The flight attendant then contacted the cockpit crew, and informed them that there was an injured passenger. After parking at the gate, a walk-around inspection revealed that the tip of a propeller blade from the number 2 engine had separated, and punctured the airplane's fuselage.Weather at the time of the accident included overcast skies and light snow.According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, one of the deer was hit by the nose landing gear and the other was hit by the right engine propeller. The separated blade tip was about 4 inches long and 3 inches wide. It entered the cabin just aft of frame 21, between stringers 14R and 15R. The passenger was sitting in seat 3C.A review of the tower audio recording revealed that an airport runway inspection had commenced shortly before the accident, but that the inspection vehicle had not yet reached the area where the accident occurred.An airport inspection following the accident revealed breaches in the perimeter fence, in gully areas near the approach end of runway 15, and abeam runway 23, about 1,300 feet from the runway threshold. According to the airport authority's assistant director, a wildlife inspection program was in effect at the time of the accident. Inspections of airport surfaces, including the one noted in the audio recordings, were conducted twice daily.Higher deer activity was typically observed between October and January due to the mating season. Perimeter fence maintenance inspections, which were conducted monthly, were scheduled to be increased during upcoming fall and winter seasons, due in part, to the higher volume of deer at that time. A program to clear the fence line of all brush and weeds, and remove all trees and brush inside the fence, was scheduled to commence in the spring of 2002. The Airport Authority was also authorized to eliminate deer as needed. While the program had been conducted within the perimeter fence for over 2 years, as a result of the accident, it was expanded to include deer near the perimeter fence as well.At the time of the accident, a wildlife management study had been approved by the FAA. The yearlong study, to include management procedures, was scheduled to begin in August 2001.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A long long time ago, when I was in the R.A.A.F. a CT 4 pilot bellied in near Woomera after the pilot what was described as a 'birdstrike'.When we went out and lifted the aircraft onto the flatbed truck we were amazed to discover the remains of an emu! Some birdstrike. (for those not in the know an emu is a flightless bird that stands about 5 feet tall)CheersMark Underwood(Adelaide, Australia)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you take a look at the Airport/Facility Directory and look up KSDM (Brown Field, San Diego) they have a NOTAM that reads, "CAUTION: Arpt boundary one mile north from Mexican/USA international border. CAUTION advised due to possible unauthorized pedestrian traffic crossing runways and taxiways." Clearly in Southern California deer and elk are not the one things to watch out for crossing the runways.[div align=center][link:members.cox.net/fstimes/wetimage.html]Click Here For Weather Image of the Day

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just think a Elk destoying a Beautiful multi-million $$ aircraft.I hope that Greenpeace doesnt protest that airport over this, no theyll probably sue the airport for not adequetly protecting the Deer/Elk population.Lets see!!Is it Elk 1...Plane..0or Plane 1...Elk...0Anyhow either way What A Shame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just two weeks ago I almost hit a buck crossing the runway after I had landed from a C/C flight with a buddy of mine. It shouldnt have even been an issue, but this particular landing I was a little fast and it took me a few more feet :) to get stopped, and I missed the taxiway that I normally exit onto, and right past that taxiway is where a big 'ole buck stood looking right into my landing light. I literally had to stand on the brakes and swerve to the right to miss him. Needless to say my buddy and I both needed to visit the restroom after that one. Im definitely on the lookout when I fly now since bow hunting season is in and gun season is in soon. The last time I heard the deer population is extremely high this year here in Iowa.CraigEdit for spelling :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this