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Faster HDD makes FS run faster?

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Will a 7200rpm drive make FS run faster than a 5400rpm HDD? Would it be too difficult to transfer FS to the new drive? See profile for system specs. Thanks

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Hi Stratus,>Will a 7200rpm drive make FS run faster than a 5400rpm HDD? Would it be too difficult to transfer FS to the new drive? See profile for system specs.I'm assuming you are changing drives from an existing single drive system and you have a current stable FS2002 installation.First, to answer the first part of the question the answer would have to be no. However, you will notice a decrease in loading times so in that sense FS will 'seem' to be performing better with fewer pauses, if any, during a flight.Once you have set up your NEW drive with the o/s I would do a fresh complete install of FS to establish the registry settings and THEN copy the FS2002 folder across from your old drive to the new installation and allow all the overwrites.I did this not so long ago and was pleasantly surprised to find that virtually everything in my pre-existing highly configured setup was still working. A few 3rd party addons needed to be reinstalled but that should present no problem as you can merely overwrite all the files from the previous installs. Backup any configuration files first in order that they can be used to update their basic installations.**************************************************************SWITCH OFF YOUR COMPUTER AND SWITCH OFF AT THE WALL SOCKET but leave the computer power lead connected. Make sure you take appropriate antistatic precautions by grounding yourself by touching the metal case or power supply unit with both hands BEFORE doing any of the following: **************************************************************To achieve the above you should temporarily unhook, say, the DVD drive or CDR/RW from an END connector on the appropriate SECONDARY IDE cable and connect that IDE connector to your old HD. This will save you having to change your old drive from master to slave. Make sure the coloured line (usually red) that runs along one edge of the cable lines up with pin "1" on your HD. Find a spare power supply connector or again simply remove temporarily the connector from either the selected DVD or CDR/RW drive and plug that into your old drive.Power up your computer and with luck your BIOS will auto detect the old drive and you will be able to see it in Windows. Carry out the copy and then reverse all of the above to restore your system back to normal.N.B. If you are at all unsure about carrying out any of the above then DON'T. Find someone who can!And finally, my apologies if all this is old hat but it is often difficult to judge a particular individual's level of expertise from his or her post.Mike

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With a faster HD you may see a modest improvement, but I doubt there will be anything startling.If you plan to replace your HD, rather than add one as a second drive, do yourself a favour and get a copy of Powerquest's Drive Copy !This will transfer everything on your old drive onto your new one bit for bit, and will even keep any existing partitions in the same proportion. Thus if you have a 10Gb drive with 4Gb and 6Gb partitions and transfer to a 40Gb drive it will create partitions of 16Gb and 24Gb in size.Full details here:http://www.powerquest.com/drivecopy/

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>If you plan to replace your HD, rather than add one as a second drive, do yourself a favour and get a copy of Powerquest's Drive Copy !Yep, I'd agree with that. If upgrading your HD is all you wish to do then 'Drive Copy' or 'Drive Image' is definitely the way to go. These programs are very user friendly and totally accurate and safe.However, this is not necessarily true if you are also wishing to update your operating system or MainBoard. All sorts of problems can arise as I discovered :( In the end I simply cut my losses, installed everything afresh on my new drive and drive imaged my old drive contents onto a second new hard drive which is also installed permanently in my new system. That way I have been able to leisurely pick away at the existing sofware installations and miscellaneous data backups and transfer as I go.Mike

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Thanks for all the tips. This will be a slave drive btw.

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Why not make the newer, faster, and hopefully more reliable, drive the master and the old drive the slave?All you need to do is reset a jumper on each drive.

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You would format and install the OS on the new drive then, right? I do have data on it, so I'd prefer to make it the slave instead of formatting it. I lost my CDRW and DVD drives btw, no idea why.

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You don't have to do either if you don't want to. Your computer will automatically detect the drive on which the operating system is located.1. I went through this process recently and here's what I did.Installed the new drive and switched around the jumpers to make the new drive the master and my old drive the slave (I now use it for backup and storage only)2. Partitioned the new drive to set up a number of logical drives; C through F.3. Installed new operating system - Windows XP Professional.4. Reinstalled my software.5. Windows XP automatically assigns drive letters so that the old drive automatically became Drive G; my CD drive became Drive H, etc.Now if you don't want to go to all this trouble, then you can use a drive image program to copy your entire drive intact to the new drive but based on my own experiences I'd rather not.

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To be honest, you are not going to see much if any differences.The speed will come when transfering data from one HD to another.I would get a 7200 with ATA 133 capabilities. With the cheap prices on hd's these days, you can't go wrong.check out http://www.tomshardware.com under the storage section, they have more info on the speeds>Will a 7200rpm drive make FS run faster than a 5400rpm HDD? >Would it be too difficult to transfer FS to the new drive? >See profile for system specs. >>Thanks

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Well how can I partition a drive? My CDRW and DVD drive don't show up at all in the BIOS now. :-(

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Well, maybe I should take the plunge: Format my drives after backing up data. I'll format both, with the 7200rpm as the main drive and 5400rpm as secondary. But after the format, will my DVD/CDRW drives appear again? Another question, just how do you format a drive? Sorry if it sounds stupid. ;-)

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Formatting the drives wouldn't make them primary (master) and secondary (slave). The only way to change them is to adjust the jumper settings; which means you need to unplug both drives and changes the jumpers at the back.You can partition your drive by running FDISK from a Win98 boot disk.I have my master drive partitioned as follows:C:Operating System (Win XP)D:ProgramsE:Downloads and Temporary StorageF:FlightSimI never install any programs into C: drive despite that is usually the default shown at installation. That way, if my operating system fails that is all I need to reinstall. My secondary hard disk is not partioned and is assigned the letter G; I use the entire drive to store back up software and FlightSim downloads.Formatting can be done either by running the FORMAT command from a Win98 boot disk or as part of the process for installing Windows XP.I don't know why your system isn't recognizing your removable drives. What operating system are you using?

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Thanks for clarifying. So I need to install the OS on both drives regardless of master/slave? Using WinXP Home.TIA

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No, you only need to install your operating system on one drive. But you can install it on both drives if you want to. Then at startup you'll get a menu asking which operating system you want to run. This is the same principle as a multi-boot system although in this case you're only using one operating system.After installing your operating system go Start/Control Panel/Performance and Maintenance/Administrative Tools then click on the Computer Management shortcut.Then click on the Disk Management option and you can change the letters assigned to each drive, or try to diagnose why your OS is not recognizing your removable drives. Did you remember to plug them back in?

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Hmm, the drives just can't be found, they're all plugged in. I'll reformat, maybe that'll clear it up.Thanks

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If you plan on keeping the old 5400 RPM drive along with the new drive, I'd recommend you make the 7200 RPM drive Master and put the OS on it, then use the old drive for storage of files that don't need a fast drive (movies, music, downloaded files etc.).The OS partition is constantly read from and written to as you use your computer. As you launch for exmaple FS2002, it loads several dll and other system files from the OS partition. Also, Windows places the swapfile on the OS partition by default, allthough you can easily change that. That's why it's better to use the faster drive for the OS.FIrst, put the new drive as slave. Create a partition on it. Copy everything you want to keep (your FS2k2 folder, My Documents, any music, videos, downloaded files etc.) to eg. Backup on the new drive. Switch off and change the new drive to master and the old one to slave. Install the OS, making sure that the OS installer does not format or repartition your new drive. When the OS loads up, you can create the addition partitions, and remove the OS from the old drive.Windows XP includes a decent partition/disk management program, but IMO, Powerquest PartitionMagic is a must-have. Makes working with partitions so much easier.By upgrading to a 7200 RPM dribe, FS2002 framerate will remain about the same, but you will noticed improved loading times. Working with other windows applications will be much faster.

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Can I also add to all the above suggestions that you should try and keep your drive well cooled - leave some airspace around it. Large capacity drives with fast seek times etc. seem to generate quite a lot of heat - I've just had a 7200 rpm Seagate Barracuda fail after only 6 months, and I suspect heat may be the cause of its early demise.I suspect that a faster drive does have a performance boost - use of the page file will be quicker. I have relatively low-spec system, but I don't have any of the low frame rate & stuttering issues that other people seem to have. I think it may be in part due to having the faster HD...

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Well, I tried to format the drive, but of course with no DVD drive, how do I read the Windows install disk? This is getting really frustrating. :-fume

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Nobody has said anything about what format to use on the new drive.NTFS or FAT32? If I use Ghost to clone my old C: to my new drive what format will it be in? Just bought a new WD 80 Special Caviar. I was thinking to use it as a full C: volume drive and use the old drive for backups only. I have been thinking It would be an easy procedure just to clone the old to the new and than shutdown and switch Master and slave jumper cables. I was thinking I wanted to format the new NTFS because FAT32 only allows 32mg partitions and I want the new to be a full 80. What I don't know is ...... What will be the format on the new drive when I get it? Will the very first thing I do will be tp reformat the new drive to NTFS? And then since my old drive is in FAT32 will it let me clone it and automaticly convert it to NTFS? My Drive is coming tomorrow, so I better know more than what I know now. Thanks, Jim Foraker

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Well I'm pretty close to giving up. Tried switching master and slave, nothing happened because I needed Windows installed. But of course my CDROM isn't detected. It works fine and is connected but Windows won't detect it! What should I do now? I can't format into WinXP because of my CDROM, then what should I do? Take it to the repair shop? I sure hope not, they'll probably charge a lot.

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FIXED! Had changed some BIOS settings after installing it the first time, as I had installed it incorrectly and wondering why it wasn't working. Changed those settings back to the default and all is well. Thanks all! Will format over Christmas, gives me something to do and lets me clean my PC out. BTW if you have Norton AntiVirus, if you reformat and reinstall it, it will give you a free subscription for another year, regardless of how long you've had it, probably due to an erased registry.Once again thanks :D

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Hmmm....if it's properly installed and power is plugged in properly I don't understand why your operating system wouldn't recognize your CD drive.Go to Start/Control Panel/Performance and Maintenance/System. From System Properties select the Hardware tab and click on Device Manager. Click on the "+" sign next to DVD/CD-ROM drives to expand the selection; the check to see if you DVD drive is listed there.If it is you can right click on the drive, select "Delete" then close out Control Panel and reboot. The Hardware Wizard should then properly recognize your drive when you reboot. If that doesn't work then I'm out of ideas about what could be causing the problem.

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1. Are your CDROM/DVD and CDR/RW drives showing as being detected by the BIOS during initial bootup? Try pressing the 'Pause' key on your keyboard at the appropriate moment to read the onscreen info.2. How many IDE interfaces do you have on your MoBo? Usually there are 2: a Primary and a Secondary. However more modern MoBo's like mine often offer 4 (2 x ATA100 and 2 x ATA133).I ask this second question because it does make it easier to set up all your drives as Master and in that way none are slowed down by slaves connected to each IDE lead. Also it allows a CDR/RW drive to exist as master on its on IDE interface with nothing else attached. In my experience most CDR/RW drives are happier connected this way.Faced with your situation what I would do is disconnect all your drives except for the new drive which you should jumper as Master on one of the Primary IDE interfaces on the MoBo. Most new drives have this setup as default. Just make sure you have the correct lead for an ATA(UDMA)100/133 drive and the black connector at the end of the lead is connected to the drive and the blue connector at the other end to the MoBo.Then connect your DVD/CDROM to the other (secondary) IDE interface. Usually the lead is not so important and an old ATA33 compatible one will do. Indeed some manufactures recommend it. We're not talking high transfer rates as with ATA100/133 Hard drives.Then what I would do is plug in your Windows XP installation disk, switch on and allow your system to boot. If all is well, and the BIOS has autodetected both drives, XP will take over, format your drive and install any necessary drivers for your DVD/CDROM prior to leading you by the hand for the rest of the installation of the operating system. Just allow it to direct you - it really is quite straightforward. I would suggest that you allow XP to create a 5Gigabyte partition for the operating system for the reasons outlined above.Once XP is up and running and you are happy that all is well you can start thinking about installing your CDR/RW drive. If you have 4 IDE interfaces on the MoBo, great. Connect all drives up as masters. If you only have two IDE interfaces I would disconnect the DVD/CDROM, rejumper it as slave and connect it to the connecter situated half way along the IDE lead on your Secondary IDE. Your CDR/RW will be master on the end of that same lead.Switch on and reboot and check all is well.Now you can temporarily connect your old drive as slave (remember to change the jumper setting) to your new main drive.Switch on, reboot and transfer all the relevant data from your old drive to a temporary folder on your new drive.If you are lucky enough to have 4 IDE interfaces the chances are you may not be able to use the other two until the appropriate drivers are installed. Usually they are provided with RAID in mind but on my MoBo can be used as ATA(UDMA)133, but you do need to install the correct drivers. Otherwise the o/s won't see any drives connected to them.I did all the above some time ago so it's possible the details may not be totally accurate as I am drawing from memory :( Anyone wishing to jump in and straighten things out, please do so.Mike

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