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Guest airbn506

Reverse pitch

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HiI am trying to add reverse pitch to a piston twin in FS9.1I went through the cfg and air files and made everything that was related to reverse pitch true or added a value. It still does not work.My question is, Is it possible to even have reverse prop pitch on a piston plane in FS9, and if so how would i go about doing it?thanks

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I don't know of any piston engine airplane with reverse pitch. You'd have to step up to a turboprop to see that.

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I don't know of any aircraft IN FS that has reverse pitch, but in RL, there are a couple of examples that have reverse pitch, two that I KNOW of are the Piper Seminole and the Beech BaronIt's not hard to put reverse on a piston, and it has the same effect as on at turboprop, just less power behind it (less is needed with smaller planes though).

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reallyi thought aircraft like the c123 and C7 caribou had itPilotbrian0 Do you know how i would go about doing this?thanks

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I'm sorry, but neither the Seminole or Baron have reverse pitch. They have CONSTANT SPEED propellers, also known as VARIABLE PITCH, but no reverse.

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The Baron I was in yesterday had reverse, unless that label under the Throttle that says "reverse" is just for show...Either way, It's not impossible, nor impractical, and I highly doubt that MSFS would have any way of precluding piston aircraft from it since, in the case of prop aircraft in general, microsoft handles the power behind the prop separate from the prop itself.So... that means that a setting is likely off somewhere. I have never worked with the powerplant side of any addon, so I really don't know about that part.

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Unless it was a Baron with an STC for a PT-6 or similar turboprop, there is NO WAY it had reverse. Geoff, where are you on this one.There is NO piston powered airplane in the world that has reverse thrust. It would cause WAAAAY too much stress on the crankshaft if it were so. The reason a turbine can have it is because it is a freewheeling crank and propeller and the shear forces are much much less.

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Thinking further about "what you saw" in the Baron...you sure it wasn't the feather position on the prop control levers. In an older Baron, the throttle quadrant consists of the prop controls on the far left, the throttles in the middle and the mixture on the far right. Feather is not the same as reverse. Feather is used in the event of an engine failure to feather the prop so that it causes the least wind resistance and in turn reduces drag to help the airplane stay airborne. I posted a very detailed description of the feather and auto-feather of a piston and turbine engine a little while ago on these forums if you're interested in searching for it.

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No, it clearly said reverse.I'll have to take your word for it being impossible because to me, physics says that it's not the force on the crankshaft that you are changing. Reverse pitch invariably has to go through 0 pitch, and when you do that, you are not stressing a crankshaft as far as I know.Now, admittedly, my real world experience with Twins is all from the right seat, and I am not rated for multi-engine, and I know of no single engine that has reverse capabilities.As far as pitch management, the "dumbed down version" is:Non-feathering: Pressure is applied to various control plates/pistons, whatever the design of the particular prop is, the pressure is used to increase the blade pitch, in the event of a leak, or loss of pressure, the blades will fall to a low pitch position, but still provide thrust.Feathering: Pressure applied pushes the blade to low pitch (and on some models, all the way to 0/reverse pitch). Some failure causing low pressure causes the blade to go to feathered position.So... I'm missing the part where going to reverse causes stress on the crankshaft, unless you mean the backwards force on the crankshaft, but there are designs tricks that can handle that.Seriously, I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just trying to put what you said together with what I know (taught to me by Certified MEI's by the way) to produce something that makes sense, and I'm adding 2 and 2 and getting 3.If anyone could explain this to me better, I'd like to understand this.-Brian

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OK, so I was wrong in my thinking that no piston prop aircraft has reverse pitch (Sim-Outhouse thread). I apologize for not doing my research. However, I still refuse to believe that the Baron you saw was equipped with reverse thrust.What was the registration of the Baron you saw this reverse pitch in? Also, what kind of engine was it? Unless it was HIGHLY modified, any stock Baron with the typical 500 series Continental engines will not have reverse thrust. What control lever was labeled with this reverse thrust? Throttle, Prop or Mixture?I have about 30 hours PIC in a Cessna 310, 20 hours PIC in a Piper Seminole and have flown a couple of legs in a Baron. All of these are in the light twin category and I've NEVER seen reverse thrust on either one.

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>I don't know of any piston engine airplane with reverse>pitch. You'd have to step up to a turboprop to see that. On this page: http://www.air-and-space.com/Douglas%20C-74.htm There is reference to a C-74 backing up with reverse pitch. Also, as a crew member on US Navy NC-121J's in Viet Nam, I recall occasionally backing into our reventment if a tow bar was unavailable. The motor mech's hated when this happened as it tended to stress the engines more than they liked in that hot climate. Paul

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I'm going to drop the Baron discussion, I don't know the tail number, nor do I have a convenient way to get it. It might have been STC'd I don't know.Either way, we've shown that Reverse Pitch is doable (maybe not preferable, but doable) on a piston. I'll accept that it puts stress on the engine, and that it's uncommon.Now then, I still doubt MSFS even thought about whether or not their planes have reverse pitch, so:If you could post your Aircraft.cfg [prop] and [engine] sections, maybe we can see something that you missed.

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Other piston aircraft that had reversing props included the Convair 240/340/440, Martin 202/404, Boeing B377 Stratocruiser, Douglas DC-6 and DC-7 series, Lockheed Connies (L-649 and later), and several others.Hope this helps,--Tom GibsonCal Classic Propliner Page: http://www.calclassic.comFreeflight Design Shop: http://www.freeflightdesign.comDrop by! ___x_x_(")_x_x___

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thanks guys for all the infoi should have phrased my origonal question better. I am looking how to add reverse prop pitch to a piston twin. i know alphasim did it with their caribou and i would like to know how to do it. For thoes that have the alphasim 'bou could you please take a look at the cfg and air files to see if there is anything different about them than a normal one.thanks

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I know of no opposed piston airplanes with reverse pitch propellors. RADIAL engines had props that reversed.If you were in a Baron and saw reverse on the throttles, then you're looking at one that's been modified, either with different engines, or by using the throttle quadrant from another airplane (remember King Airs are a Beech product too).

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The sim outhouse link above tells you the basic process. However, this involves a complete rewrite of the AIR file engine thrust code, is best created by an expert, and a gauge used to modify the throttle's behavior.Hope this helps,--Tom GibsonCal Classic Propliner Page: http://www.calclassic.comFreeflight Design Shop: http://www.freeflightdesign.comDrop by! ___x_x_(")_x_x___

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