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BIGSKY

47 Inch LCD TV

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Hi all, I am running a Geforce 295,And tried my LG 1080P 47 inch LCD,With a Monster HDMI cable. I was not too impresed with the quality(video settings maxed out) Should I use the RS 232 conection on the TV for better results? Thanks from Jim

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RS 232 is a serial data port and not used for video. Also you wasted a ton of money on that HDMI cable. Read this. HDMI cables are purely digital. Signals are 0's and 1's, off and on. There's no in-between.

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Hi all, I am running a Geforce 295,And tried my LG 1080P 47 inch LCD,With a Monster HDMI cable. I was not too impresed with the quality(video settings maxed out) Should I use the RS 232 conection on the TV for better results? Thanks from Jim
RS232 has a very small bandwidth, so it will be useless for video streaming. How long is Your cable? HDMI degrades rapidly above 5m.Also, try to calibrate the picture in LCD flatpanel. I have seen somewhere a THX CD with the demo and specially prepared graphics to set picture quality on LCD with reference pictures.You can also compare the signal from analog source (i.e. D-Sub) - if the picture will look better, go change this HDMI cable

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Hi all, I am running a Geforce 295,And tried my LG 1080P 47 inch LCD,With a Monster HDMI cable. I was not too impresed with the quality(video settings maxed out) Should I use the RS 232 conection on the TV for better results? Thanks from Jim
The first thing to do is find out if you have a

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Thank's for the reply's,I used a VGA cable,And all is well :(

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Thank's for the reply's,I used a VGA cable,And all is well :Drooling:
Again the optimal way to connect a PC to a HDTV is via a DVI to HDMI cable unless of course your TV is applying unwanted image correction on the HDMI input. If your HDTV has the ability of turning off image correction/processing on any input port, using a HDMI input is the best option.Here's are differences between DVI and VGA taken from another site -
DVI - information goes directly from your video card to your monitor. The color of each pixel on your monitor is calculated by your video card and then sent as digital information to your monitor so that no conversion is necessary. An LCD monitor simply reads this information and displays it directlyVGA - Information is converted from digital to [red,green,blue] format. Some accuracy and time is lost in this converstion. How much is lost depends on the monitor's conversion hardware.Image Quality:On a CRT monitor, there is no real image quality difference between DVI and VGA. This is because a CRT is natively based on the [red,green,blue] format for displaying each pixel.On an LCD, you will notice a difference between the 2 formats if you look hard enough. Different LCDs will handle the conversion differently. You may start to see dithering, banding, "dancing pixels" and blander/incorrect colors when using vga on an LCD. The larger the LCD/resolution the more you will notice these differences.DVI also has a faster data transfer rate, which means that the higher the resolution, the worse the input lag will be if you use VGA. This is very important if you play fast(twitch) shooter games.Finally, VGA only contains the color information for your monitor's image. DVI includes more than that. That's why when you connect using DVI, you don't have to adjust your monitor's image position, phase, and clock corrections to sync. It contains exactly how/what your video card wants to display.If you hook up your LCD with VGA, you will notice that several monitor adjustments become available were they were not under DVI. That is because DVI carries all the information your monitor needs to configure itself where as VGA does not.

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