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when will a pilot use thrust reverse and when not on a normal jet landing?regards,Seba

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Depends on runway length and surface, speed, company policy, noise restrictions, etc.

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Hi Seba, I take the wording of your question to mean the use of reverse thrust in flight? If so, then at least on the newer models of 747 and (all?) 777s, it isn't possible. The reversers are safety interlocked with the squat switches in the undercarriage. The weight of the plane has to be compressing the gear (and therefore the switches) for reverse thrust to be selected. I know there's such a thing as 'idle reverse' that can be used on some planes to reduce speed during a high approach - but I'm not entirely sure of the mechanics of this. Cheers,Paul

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I was actually talking about the landing,but thx for the information anywayregards,Seba

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As strange as it may seems, it is also used for pushback. Greetings Minos

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Yes, it does seem strange Minos. All the SOP/FOM manuals I've seen prohibit the use of reverse thrust during pushback.Cheers,Paul

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.haworth/Fortress.gifVoted Best Virtual Airline of 2002 and Best CEO of 2002 by participants in the BIG VA Vote organized by FSPILOT.com

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Paul,Northwest Airlines (the largest user of DC-9's)does power backs on the 9's all the time and the FAA approved Pilot Operating Manuel authorizes it as does the Operating Spec's for Northwest.Ed Weber a.k.a tallpilot

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I remember being on a plane and seeing this doen one time at KDFW. Dont remember what airline, but I could not believe it. I told one of my ATP rated friends and he laughed and said "Texas pilots... figures"-------------Holding Short

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Hi Guys,in Germany I hasn't seen, that pilots need the reverse thrust for pushback. Greetings from GermanyJan

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Whether powerback is allowed depends on the terminal layout and the availability of ground handling equipment (and probably on noise restrictions as well).Some airports don't have (enough) pushback trucks, in which case powerbacks are sometimes performed.In noise-crazy Europe, they're not seen on civilian installations.Airlines try to avoid powerbacks as the risk of damage to the engines is quite real (as well as the added wear and tear on the engines).Some airlines even restrict the use of reversers on landing because of the increased wear on the engines (this led to a near disaster some years ago when a Cathay Pacific jet overshot the runway when the pilot could not (according to airline procedures) use reversers on a slippery runway coming in too fast.

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I was on a Northwest flight that used the reversers to pushback from the gate. Then we sat there for about an hour because the indicator light never went out to show that the reverser had traveled back to its original position. They checked it out, opened it & closed it again, looked at it some more, and then finally determined there was something wrong with the indicator & sent us on our way. :-)

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What a waste of fuel :-eek think a pushing start will cost lessregards,Seba

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It's not a waste of fuel, infact it uses very little fuel to do a Powerback and compared to the initial cost of the pushback tugs and the upkeep cost it actually saves the airlines money. At Northwest we found that if the ramps were kept clean we had no problem with damage to engine due to Powerbacks. We did not do them if the ramp was covered with snow or ice though.Ed Weber a.k.a tallpilot

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This is not a ground use thing, but in my advanced systems class my professor was talking about T.R.s. On the C-17 they can actually deploy them in flight and get some ungodly rate of decent, he thought something like 15,000 feet a minute. They will fly extremely height over the landing area, slam dunk down and not have to make a long approach for landing. It is amazing to think that they use an aircraft that large for tatical operations.Take care,-C.J. Starr

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Ed,As far as I am aware, the DC9 is the ONLY airliner that is capable of using reverse thrust at pushback. Either that, or it's the only one that is ALLOWED to do it.Chris Low,ENGLAND.

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The BAE Advanced Turboprop (ATP) can do this and the procedure seems standard for British Airways. It is very odd to watch these machines going into reverse like a motor car!Betel

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Sorry Minos, I don't see any evidence. I see a pic of a plane and that's it. Admittedly the clamshells suggest the pilot is using reverse thrust, but is the plane moving?! Anyway, I believe you - thousands wouldn't ;-), but I do.Cheers,Paul

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.haworth/Fortress.gifVoted Best Virtual Airline of 2002 and Best CEO of 2002 by participants in the BIG VA Vote organized by FSPILOT.comVANF "Best" New Virtual Airline Award

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Hi Betel,>seems standard for British AirwaysI assure you that it is not!Cheers,Paul

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/paul.haworth/Fortress.gifVoted Best Virtual Airline of 2002 and Best CEO of 2002 by participants in the BIG VA Vote organized by FSPILOT.comVANF "Best" New Virtual Airline Award

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The DC-8 also used to deploy reversers in flight to slow down (I believe the DC-8 was not equipped with spoilers).... I was on a flight from JFK to Milan in '77, in a charter DC-8 (TransInternational) which used them, giving the uncanny sensation that we had almost stopped in midair. Sure created a racket in the cabin...and the pilot warned ahead of time what he was doing and why, so we wouldn't be alarmed.John

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I agree Paul. I have watched airliners being pushed back numerous times at Manchester Airport and elsewhere, and I have NEVER seen one use reverse thrust for this purpose. Of course, it could be a touch difficult for the BA Embraer 145 to do this anyway (plus any Bae 146/Avro RJ), since it doesn't have thrust reversers.Chris Low,ENGLAND.

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Chris,The first airplane that I did powerbacks on was the Convair 580 turboprop at North Central Airlines (later to become Republic and then merged with Northwest)in the early 1970's. I've done hundreds of powerbacks on the DC-9 and on the MD-80's. I've seen 757's (Eastern if I remember correctly and maybe Delta) have done powerbacks and also 727's.Ed Weber a.k.a tallpilotP.S. I can't powerback my Baron however, only feather it no reverse. :-)

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