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Guest Cyril_Murat

A detail and end of flight questions

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Hi all, Hi Bryan.-> During the preflight, the F/O doesn't test the altimeters like it is asked for in anonther normal procedure (arm 1000' above ground, turns the barometer up until alt is capture and then go out +- 250' to ear the "ALTITUDE" signal. Is it an optional test or just something forgoten?During the preflight, the F/O only check CM1's EFIS, not his own. Is it an optional test or just something forgoten?-> Maybe I just missed it but I don't think that the F/O starts his own clock when starting the taxi and stops it when at the gate. I see that he has to stop the clock after landing but I'm not sure about the one that he stops...-> After the landing and the unboarding starts, I don't know how long I must wait... The ground crew never tells when unboarding is complete. At the same time, during unboarding, could my favorite f/o help me to switch off things? If she's been able to bring the plane to life, maybe she can help to bring it cold and dark ;)Regards,Cyril

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Hi again Cyril,I will have to go sleep now, but try to answer you part of your questions:

-> During the preflight, the F/O doesn't test the altimeters like it is asked for in anonther normal procedure (arm 1000' above ground, turns the barometer up until alt is capture and then go out +- 250' to ear the "ALTITUDE" signal. Is it an optional test or just something forgoten?
I never have done so and never seen that done by anyone else, and haven't seen that in any manual as far as I can remember. I will check anyway
During the preflight, the F/O only check CM1's EFIS, not his own. Is it an optional test or just something forgoten?
ok... that I sometimes check in the real bird, but only my (FO) side. I don't know other companies, but it is not usual to check that one.But what is usual to check is the autoland test. Both (1 & 2) should be checked because it also tests the DFGS. That for the first flight. Then in the turn arounds at least the side that will be used.
-> Maybe I just missed it but I don't think that the F/O starts his own clock when starting the taxi and stops it when at the gate. I see that he has to stop the clock after landing but I'm not sure about the one that he stops...
FO & capt both should start their clock just prior take off. In FS2Crew FO says "timing". Clock should be stopped (only stopped, not reset) after landing. Didin't check that one.
-> After the landing and the unboarding starts, I don't know how long I must wait... The ground crew never tells when unboarding is complete. At the same time, during unboarding, could my favorite f/o help me to switch off things? If she's been able to bring the plane to life, maybe she can help to bring it cold and dark ;)
Concerning the boarding, could you Bryan check that one?Concerning switching off... you can order the FO parking check and before leaving acft check as well. There are many items you have to do by yourself, yes, but I think it's better like that. No real hurry anymore, both can concentrate on the same, so why not doing it together? :( Regards,Samuli

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Hi and thanks again for quick answer.-> Altimeters : "I never have done so and never seen that done by anyone else"So I'll assume it's not a "must do" in my future operation. Glad to ear it because it takes time and I often want not to do it ;-) You can find it in First Flight Of Day's Continental Airline's Procedure in the "Flight Guidance" checking part (see picture)-> Don't always check both EFIS Good. That will save time too and if it's like that in real world, really no need to do it in FS!-> Both pilots turns the timers on before takeoffOK. Another demonstration that every airline is different. I got this information from an ATR pilot who told it to a friend of mine... so I believe it wasn't an systematic operation.-> No real hurry anymore,OK. I didn't had this point of view (spread job when in a hurry, take time to share when not). It makes sence and I'll understand better why I have to switch off things by myself.Best regards,Cyril

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Funny to see that concerning the altitude alert test. I never saw that before in any of the airlines I am somehow familiar with. You everyday learn something new... There you can see how things change from airline to airline....That seems to happen with the timing as well.I will try to explain the timing stuff from my understanding:Make difference btw chrono and timing, chrono is what you use when for example starting an engine, shorter periods of time, where you need to check minutes and seconds.What do you need timing for? 2 main reasons:-To get flight time... duration of the flight. It can be block time (from chock to chock) or flight time (TO to LND).-Important one: when you make the TO, if you suffer an engine failure, this will be the best indication about how longtime you have been using TO power. (normally 5-10min max, depending on acft type).You can start timing from chocks away, but not really when you start taxiing... what for? (Maybe there is a reason that I don't know, and if there is one I would be more than happy to know).Why timing flight time and not block time? At least in jet acfts for the reason I mentioned above (do you think you will remember to switch ON chrono when your engine fails during TO roll?).As for the last part... the parking check and before leaving acft just to mention that in my company is the FO who makes it silent. This is more a "read & do" check. But in other companies I know it works more similar to how it is simulated in FS2Crew.So means there as well you can find different possibilities.Samuli

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You can start timing from chocks away, but not really when you start taxiing... what for? (Maybe there is a reason that I don't know, and if there is one I would be more than happy to know).Samuli
Hello, as far as I know, it is more or less a commercial stuff, and it is related to the STD that appears on sold tickets.It is a rule established by IATA, and all delay codes take the block out time as a reference.

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Hello, as far as I know, it is more or less a commercial stuff, and it is related to the STD that appears on sold tickets.It is a rule established by IATA, and all delay codes take the block out time as a reference.
Correct, but that has no effect to cockpit operations. The cockpit chrono in all airliners I know is just a fancy stopwatch for situational awareness purpose. You could write down times and calculate the total hours / minutes after the flight if you wanted.Block times for flight ops / corporate purposes are transmitted most often these days by ACARS.banner_fs2crew_team_kk.png

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