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ryanbatcund

Enabling PLL Overvoltage encourages boot loops

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I have been experiencing this phenomenon, and so I think I will stay at 4 GHz. I admit, it's frusterating to see you guys at 5+ GHz and me stuck at 4, but I'm not willing to deal with the hassles this board will throw at me.Someone wrote about PLL voltage in the GB forums:"Please disable CPU PLL Overvoltage.This setting is *incompatible* with S3 sleep on *ALL* known P67 motherboards. Intel has admitted this is an issue with the microcode and NOT a motherboard issue. PLL Overvoltage is a special method to get higher multipliers to work that were not originally designed to work, and putting the computer to sleep causes (whatever PLL overvoltage actaully changes---note, it does NOT change the actual CPL PLL voltage itself), to be removed on wakeup.If you need CPU PLL overvoltage for your overclock, then either lower your overclock to where you can disable that setting, or don't use S3 sleep. No ands, ifs ors or buts."ref: http://www.overclock.net/intel-motherboards/901820-official-gigabyte-p67a-owners-club-discussion-55.htmlNow, my question is: What the heck is S3 sleep? Is that hibernation? I disable that in Win7.Anyway, here's a nice big picture - it's awesome to run 30fps @ LOD 8.5 in Orbx areas! This is enjoyable :)lod85.jpg

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I have been experiencing this phenomenon, and so I think I will stay at 4 GHz. I admit, it's frusterating to see you guys at 5+ GHz and me stuck at 4, but I'm not willing to deal with the hassles this board will throw at me.Someone wrote about PLL voltage in the GB forums:"Please disable CPU PLL Overvoltage.This setting is *incompatible* with S3 sleep on *ALL* known P67 motherboards. Intel has admitted this is an issue with the microcode and NOT a motherboard issue. PLL Overvoltage is a special method to get higher multipliers to work that were not originally designed to work, and putting the computer to sleep causes (whatever PLL overvoltage actaully changes---note, it does NOT change the actual CPL PLL voltage itself), to be removed on wakeup.If you need CPU PLL overvoltage for your overclock, then either lower your overclock to where you can disable that setting, or don't use S3 sleep. No ands, ifs ors or buts."ref: http://www.overclock.net/intel-motherboards/901820-official-gigabyte-p67a-owners-club-discussion-55.htmlNow, my question is: What the heck is S3 sleep? Is that hibernation? I disable that in Win7.Anyway, here's a nice big picture - it's awesome to run 30fps @ LOD 8.5 in Orbx areas! This is enjoyable :)lod85.jpg
From Wikipedia:Power States[edit] Global statesThe ACPI specification defines the following seven states (so-called global states) for an ACPI-compliant computer-system: G0 (S0): Working G1, Sleeping subdivides into the four states S1 through S4: S1: All processor caches are flushed, and the CPU(s) stop executing instructions. Power to the CPU(s) and RAM is maintained; devices that do not indicate they must remain on may be powered down. S2: CPU powered off S3: Commonly referred to as Standby, Sleep, or Suspend to RAM. RAM remains powered S4: Hibernation or Suspend to Disk. All content of main memory is saved to non-volatile memory such as a hard drive, and is powered down. G2 (S5), Soft Off: G2 is almost the same as G3 Mechanical Off, but some components remain powered so the computer can "wake" from input from the keyboard, clock, modem, LAN, or USB device. G3, Mechanical Off: The computer's power consumption approaches close to zero, to the point that the power cord can be removed and the system is safe for dis-assembly (typically, only the real-time clock is running off its own small battery).Furthermore, the specification defines a Legacy state: the state on an operating system which does not support ACPI. In this state, the hardware and power are not managed via ACPI, effectively disabling ACPI.[edit] Device statesThe device states D0-D3 are device-dependent: D0 Fully On is the operating state. D1 and D2 are intermediate power-states whose definition varies by device. D3 Off has the device powered off and unresponsive to its bus.[edit] Processor statesThe CPU power states C0-C3 are defined as follows: C0 is the operating state. C1 (often known as Halt) is a state where the processor is not executing instructions, but can return to an executing state essentially instantaneously. All ACPI-conformant processors must support this power state. Some processors, such as the Pentium 4, also support an Enhanced C1 state (C1E or Enhanced Halt State) for lower power consumption.[7] C2 (often known as Stop-Clock) is a state where the processor maintains all software-visible state, but may take longer to wake up. This processor state is optional. C3 (often known as Sleep) is a state where the processor does not need to keep its cache coherent, but maintains other state. Some processors have variations on the C3 state (Deep Sleep, Deeper Sleep, etc.) that differ in how long it takes to wake the processor. This processor state is optional.[edit] Performance statesWhile a device or processor operates (D0 and C0, respectively), it can be in one of several power-performance states. These states are implementation-dependent, but P0 is always the highest-performance state, with P1 to Pn being successively lower-performance states, up to an implementation-specific limit of n no greater than 16.P-states have become known as SpeedStep in Intel processors, as PowerNow! or Cool'n'Quiet in AMD processors, and as PowerSaver in VIA processors. P0 max power and frequency P1 less than P0, voltage/frequency scaled Pn less than P(n-1), voltage/frequency scaledNice picture by the way.

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@Ryanbatcund:Who would want a computer to sleep or hibernate, if you want it for FSX mainly, or??For the sake of the Flightsim Gods:Read Nick Needhams instructions on setting up a PC for FSX, please!!!rolleyes.gif

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Read Nick Needhams instructions on setting up a PC for FSX, please!!!
Already set mine up per that thread... that's what I'm saying, my hibernation is disabled, power management is all set to high, never turn off HDD's, never turn off anything. I wanted to be sure something wasn't amiss with my setup.I think these P67 boards have some leftover issues from the B2 revisions... ugh...Oh well, this rig shall last me another 3+ years hehe.

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Okay, you´ll find out, 3 years should be OK time for that...Just%20Kidding.gifBut as mentioned in the other thread, you need PLL enabled for serious overclock.Have a look at this, 5.5 Ghz with "your" board!
The guy with 5.5 is on water... so many different combinations, and he got lucky.

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Who would want a computer to sleep or hibernate, if you want it for FSX mainly, or??
I would, so I don't have to wait forever to start-up FSX (don't have those mahvelous SSDs... yet!)Cheers,- jahman.

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The guy with 5.5 is on water... so many different combinations, and he got lucky.
Ryan, want me to post you pics of my current BIOS settings? Asking since you would like to go for 5.0 but unstable.I found out that running some things on Auto is more stable for me than anything else.I know its another board, but could serve you as a helper.Give me a chime if you want.And btw. for me no sleep, no C3... just good old turn off monitor after 10min and in BIOS Speedstep and C1E.

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Thanks for the offer but I'm just going to stay here at 4GHz. I'd had zero FSX CTD's at 4GHz, Portal 2 finally works without a CTD, and the PC just seems happy :)

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