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Sonar5

1st solo Stories

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I will be doing my 1st solo flight within the next week or two in a Warrior II.I'm looking for some of your 1st solo stories, so I'll know what to expect!thanksMikeFavorite area to Fly--Alaska!

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HI did my first solo in c150 REGO VH-HVU i had to wait all week because the weather was bad very long week that one!! but when it did come it was one of the biggest highlights of my life. you never really think that you can fly until you look and see that you are the only one in the plane! Good luck Regards Paul.

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My solo was delayed several times by early December weather in the Northeast US, but finally a lovely Saturday afternoon and a call from my CFI to tell he had reserved an airplane and get my hind end to the airport. After preflight, etc., we got in line for takeoff...and waited...and waited while every other pilot on the airport either took off or landed on this great day. (Turned out they all had the right idea as that winter was one of the worst in many years!). We finally got into the air and headed for a nearby uncontrolled field. After a couple of touch-and-goes, Chris told me to let him out and go do three landings. He got out and I taxied to the end of Rwy 36. I wasn't really nervous since I knew I was going to solo that day. I got to the hold-short line and announced "Oxford traffic, Cessna 150 readly for takeoff Rwy 36, Oxford." I looked up final and saw a airplanes on final, then a chorus of radio calls from others on downwind and more entering on the 45. I sat there and sat there for what seemed like an hour, now I getting more nervous as one plane after another landed in front of me. Finally, Chris, my CFI, got on his handheld and announced that the Cessna waiting for takeoff was a first solo and to please let him go. A Bonanza on final then said he would do a go-around so I could takeoff. There was then a chorus of "good lucks" from other pilots and after a deep breath, off I went. I talked to myself all the way around the pattern, remembered by position calls and was really a pilot. After each of my landings, the other pilots who were still in the pattern and a few on the ground all offered congratulations and/or good-natured sarcasm about my efforts (which were pretty darn good, if I say so myself). After all three, I picked up Chris and we took off for out home field. By this time, it was just about dark so I got my first night time and my first night landing when we got back. A marvelous day and one I will never forget! Good luck

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Hi allThere's an urban legend hanging around in the South African Air Force about solos in the now retired T-6 Harvard (or Texan for the people over the ocean ...)Both cockpits in the Harvard have removable control sticks ... Usually the instructor would take out his stick and hit the student sitting in front of him on the head with it ... so one instructor made a habit of throwing out the stick, forcing the student to get them back to safety. So, as with all students, you get a few smartasses, so one guy took along an extra stick, so when the instructor threw out his stick, so did the student ... you can imagine the instructor sweating to fly the plane on only elevator and rudder trim ...Be glad you're doing it in a Warrior ...Good Luck !!!Secks woz hear ...

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Your first solo will be unforgettable, you know, like the kind of memories you dredge up when you think, "the first time..." :)The date of my first solo was pretty gusty and turbulent, so my instructor and I agreed that we'd just do patternwork and practice gusty crosswind landings. All I got out of that day's flight like being a pea tossed around in the pod. Lots of good practice, but I was pretty disappointed that I didn't solo that afternoon. However the weather forecast called for calmer winds so we agreed to meet again around sunset to try again.Met again at sunset, did a few gos around the pattern again, then after the second pattern, he just said "stop here.... Your plane," and he got out of the plane.... (gulp)So, the radio call "Morrisville traffic, Skyhawk 8942V, backtaxi-ing runway 19 for departure, Morrisville" look for traffic, nope no traffic, taxi, do the 7-up-- fuel selector-both, flaps up, mixture rich, carb heat cold, trim neutral, etc... 180 turn on the runway to get lined up on 19 for takeoff. DG - mag compass compared and checked, altimeter 740ft good, strobes on, transponder on, wind sock - slight right crosswind, put in right aileron, radio call, "Departing runway 19, remaining in the pattern"Pushed the throttle into the firewall, RPMs good, oil press oil temp green, airspeed alive, oops too much aileron, rotation speed, I'm off the runway, keep mashing that right rudder-center that ball. trim nose-down 70kts climb speed. Woah-look at that rate of climb, this thing really climbs without some of that flight instructor weight...I lifted off into a clear New England sky. To my right fiery reds and oranges proclaimed an impending sunset behind Mount Mansfield. 1200ft, clear left wing, clear left and turn.Upon turning east into the crosswind leg, I saw the deepest indigo-violet-blue sky I had ever seen. Among the carpet of evergreens in the notch between Mount Elmore and the Worchester Range the full moon loomed ahead, rising to bathe the countryside with its soothing glow."Turn... Turn... Hey! You can turn downwind any time now," demanded this annoying voice in my headset. Huh? Oh that was just my flight instructor putting his boot up my butt to break me away from the moonrise. Then I remembered where I was, in Cessna 8942V on my first solo, and that I'm supposed to be flying the pattern. Oops. I had gotten mesmerized by the really cool moonrise and just kept climbing on crosswind past 1700ft to the east, climbing thru 2800ft and almost past the ridge, leaving Morrisville behind.Turn back to the airport, 1900 RPM, carb heat on, descend to 1700ft. Cool I can do the 45 entry... "Morrisville traffic, Skyhawk 8942V left 45 entry for runway 19 full stop, Morrisville." landing checklist... seatbelts....Landing was uneventful right at sunset.Good luck on your solo. It'll be one of your unique memories. Don't get too nervous about it, your instructor wouldn't have let you solo if he didn't feel confident you can do it. Use your checklists, and keep your head on a swivel with an eye peeled for other fellow aviators out there. :)Cheers :)Steve / KMVL

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Seemed like it took me about 150 hours of pattern work before I finally got the signoff, but I look back at my logbook and it was really only about 8. I had a very demanding instructor, he didn't demand perfection, but he did expect you to fly to a higher standard than the PTS, which looking back at it I'm greatful for because it made me a better pilot. At any rate, I wanted to solo more than anything and I was starting to get frustrated. I'm sure any pilot can relate: strong winds one day, snowstorm the next, a few bad landings the next and so on. It was an ugly day, overcast at about 1700 feet, scattered rain, winds at about 9 kts and as I drove to the airport I figured I was just going through the motions again and that my instructor wouldn't sign me off. I preflighted the plane and off we went for some trips around the pattern, we did about 8 landings and as we flew one of the patterns he commented that I was flying well today and asked how I was feeling about it. I said I felt good, and no sooner than the words had left my mouth he was on the radio to the FBO asking if we could extend my time in the airplane for a solo. We were given the OK, no one was schedualed to fly that day. We parked in the runup spot and he filled out my endorsements. He unplugged his headset and winked as he told me "I'll take these with me now, just in case...Show me 3 takeoffs and full stop landings. Good luck, you'll do fine! " So I took off, and flew the first pattern. On such a lousy day there wasn't anyone in the pattern at any of the fields that share the common frequencies. It was eerilly quiet being alone in a plane with no sound other than the engine and your own breathing. I remember jumping the first time I heard someone make a radio call as I was halfway down final. Anyways, I made my 3 landings, they were all passable. (Not beautiful, but they were ok) I taxied back in, was congragulated by the instructors and FBO staff and went back to the classroom to debrief with my instructor. I remember smiling the whole drive home. Good luck to you! It's probably the most exciting and memorable event in your flying career. Rob

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Well I am really enjoying your solo stories! I did 6 touch and goes today at Mansfield in Massachusetts with some strong gusty croswinds. It was a bit tricky but fun. I am confident that I can solo, I guess my instructor isn't yet. I'm looking forward to kicking him out of my plane. LOL! I logged 14 hours in December and I am looking forward to many more in January, weather permiting! New England weather is tough this time of year. It was so cold today at the airport that the door on the Warrior II was frozen shut! But it will be well worth it when the nice spring and summer months come along to go flying with my family and friends!Favorite area to Fly--Massachusetts!Thanks, looking forward to reading many more solo stories.Mike

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Finally Soloed today!!I made my solo flight today abard a Warrior II N9118S at Mansfield Airport! My son and my instructor took off from Norwood airport and headed to Mansfield. I did 2 rehearsal landings and then my CFI Signed off my Student Pilot Certificate! there was only one little problem, his pen ran out of ink! Luckily my son had a pen with him! Phew! I did 3 take offs and landings. The traffic pattern at this uncontrolled airport was a beehive of activity today, as it was a perfect day for flying!There was 3 ahead of me to take off so that gave me some time to review what was ahead of me in my mind. I announce on unicom that it was my 1st solo and I got lots of best wishes from pilots all over!When I made my 1st landing, a pilot that was going to take off behind me sais "N9118S, I have been flying for 15 years, and I still cant land that good!" Well that made me feel great as it was a perfect "greaser!" I made 2 more of those greasers and after a few snapshopts and my CFI presented me with some really nice wings to pin on my chest,we were off to Norwood again in the sunset! Wow! what a day! I dont know if I'll be able to sleep tonight. It was very exciting!!MikeN9118SFavorite area to Fly--Alaska!

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Hi Mike,I soloed at KSQL (San Carlos, CA), a Class D tower airport. On my 2nd time around the pattern, the controller got real busy, and while midfield downwind asked me for a 360 for spacing- which I'd done many times with my CFI for the same reason.Many years later, in my private pilot flying "career", I made good friends with a B737 pilot. I recounted this, and she actually got into me for bad judgement- said as a student pilot soloing I should not have been backwards in coming forwards with that magic word "unable". I never thought much about it at the time, and the controller knew me well even though we had never actually met. I have actually used that "u" word since at a different and more busy airports for different reasons, and every time I do I feel good- never be scared to tell someone you don't feel comfortable doing something- after all you're up there and the controller is down there :)Congrats- welcome to the fraternity of pilots. Remember, even if you're still a student, if you're on your own, your word and decisions are final and carry the same authority as that 4 striped captain of that B747 over there :)Good luck, flying is the very best of all worlds!Bruce.KBJC, Jeffco, CO.PS. Get the latest AOPA Flight Training magazine in bookstores now and read about a solo that went into a near emergency. BK.

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Thanks Bruce for your encourage ment and words of advice!Mike N9118SFavorite area to Fly--Alaska!

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Back in the 60's, Phoenix AZ, old Navy pilot as my instructor and flying the famous C150's. I was racking up many hours of dual time and the last few times out, Jim asked if I was ready to Solo, and me, the pessimist I used to be, always said "next time". I never knew if I was really ready!Next Saturday AM, went up for three local dual T&G's, and when on final I happened to look into the rear view mirror and saw Jim fast asleep in the right seat. He was that way till I hit the asphalt and then repeated, "today the day Don?" I figured if he can sleep while I am flying I guess I can do it! I said, "sure".The one thing I really remember was (and Jim was not that heavy but did have a few beers showing under his belt), when I was airborn I could not believe how light that C-150 was. Once in the pattern I actually began to wonder if I could get that darn thing back on the ground again. Well, needless to say, I did and you will do just fine.Once you get busy with "setup" on downwind your mind takes over again and you have no time to think about being alone. It was great and like others have said, something I will never forget!

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The morning was September 8th, 1996. It was a clear morning, nothing really different from any other Texas September day. It was a day of a new found level of nervousness on my part, for it was to be the day of my first solo. My father and I did not exchange many words on the drive to the airport, just a few words of wisdom and encouragement. Finally I was about to get my hands on the controls of an aircraft with no one else there. All the hours of study and attention I had paid to my instructor were about to be tested. He and I jumped into the Piper and fired it up, a few quick bounces to warm me up. He saw that I was nervous and told me that if I kept flying the way I had been, that it would be no problem, just go on what I had learned. The mood had been lightened and I felt more relaxed as we taxied back to the FBO, the nervous feeling in my stomach was still there but now along with a renewed sense of enthusiasm. As I pulled next to the hangar, not a word was said, just a quick smile and with that, he popped the door open and hopped out. I never remembered the taxi to runway 17 being so long as it was now. The whole time going through checklists and watching the pattern. Before I knew it, I was taking the runway. I advanced the power, gave the instruments a quick scan, and released the brakes. The moment I broke ground, the nerves were gone, replaced with a new found sensation of truly being the pilot in command. With my cautious new found wings, I commenced my series of touch-and-go

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I knew I was getting close to the solo hop. When my instructor told me to stop on the ramp just after taxiing off the active runway and opened the door of the plane, I figured this was it.Told me to do two touch and go landings and then a full stop. On my second, the tower put me on a crosswind runway because of traffic conflicts. I didn't think anything of it...just made the touch and go and started around for the third landing. After all, we had been practicing with crosswinds all along.After taxiing back in to the FBO, I found out that my instructor had gotten on the phone to the tower to give 'em hell for doing that to a first solo student.That's it! I survived.Oh! I do remember looking over at the empty seat next to me as I was waiting for the tower to say, "Cessna two one Golf, clear for takeoff runway one seven.". It was a good feeling. Thanks for making me recall it. http://myweb.cableone.net/joesumralliii/hook5.gif

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I remember taking off turning to the down wind leg and glancing at the empty seat to my right and realizing that for the 1st time in my life I truly was in charge of my own destiny. There would be no help getting back on the ground this day. Something that you will never forget. 1982, c150.Good luck,Steve

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Hi Mike,Congrats on the SOLO... When I read the first part, I went back to an old forum and found my solo post form 1999. Here it is.From:http://www.studentpilot.net/cf/msgboard/me...sageid=7780&g=0(Lesson 12) 1:00 pm cst 5/16/99 JOT (Joliet) First SoloWell, I just solo'ed in a Cessna 152 on the grass strip at Joliet (JOT). I took the plane up for 3 takeoffs and 3 landings, and man was it cool. I now have 30 landings under my belt, of which 21 have been on the grass strip. We did 3 Takeoffs and landings on the paved runway (12)(Two of which were emergency descents), then the winds changed so we switched to the grass strip (22). The winds were at 10 knts from 190 degrees, so 22 was the best choice. We did 3 T-offs & L's, then he said ok, are you ready, I said yep, and we taxied back, to fill out the logs. He endorsed my log book, and the plane was all mine. (Very cool being PIC, pilot in command). The feeling when you depart the ground for the first time is a feeling I don't think I will ever forget. I was grinning from ear to ear. The first landing wasn't perfect, but I did have a 30 degree crosswind to deal with. With a little crab going, (Airplane turned slightly into the wind) she came around just fine. The second one, I took off on runway 22 (Grass Strip) again, climbed to 1100ft msl, announced, and turned to crosswind when a twin on the ground announced he was departing on runway 12, which would have been directly in the path of my downwind leg for 22. He did say he was heading east after departing, so I announced I was maintaining heading of 120 degrees, so he could depart, even though I would have had the right of way. ( He could have waited until I turned and passed on my downwind leg, but I guess he was in a hurry)....., So I entered the downwind at a 45 degree entry, and continued my pattern work. The second landing on the grass strip was my best, it is always good to stay ahead of the airplane, then I back-taxied, on runway 22 (grass strip), crossed 12 & 30, and did my third takeoff, and landing. The wind was gusting a bit, I feel that was my best pattern, and the landing was pretty good, too. I feel I soloed at the right time, and it was awesome..... Next lesson, 5/23/99, we will be going to a controlled airport to get that out of the way. (Aurora, IL. ARR) Joe........(Renting) Cessna 152 (N25807) And here is a recap of My Checkride:http://www.studentpilot.net/cf/msgboard/me...ageid=11386&g=0Anyway, Congrats again.regards,JoeHere is my new sig...You Like it? :-lol :-lol.http://home.attbi.com/~sonar5/sig1.jpg.Here are Picture Galleries of My Trip out west in 2002..Gallery #1 Pima Air & Space Museum + AMARC (Boneyard) at Davis Monthan AFB, Tucson, Arizona. (over 240 Pictures)http://www.pbase.com/sonar5/pimaamarc

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