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Manny

Would you please help stupid me?

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I am trying to understand the ASUS Power dig thingi

 

This is what I read here

 

http://www.overclock...-uefi-oc-guides

 

 

"CPU Voltage: There are two ways to control CPU core voltage; Offset Mode and Manual Mode. Manual mode assigns a static level of voltage for the processor. Offset Mode allows the processor to request voltage according to loading conditions and operating frequency. Offset mode is preferred for 24/7 systems as it allows the processor to lower its voltage during idle conditions, thus saving a small amount of power and reducing unnecessary heat. The caveat of Offset Mode is that the full load voltage the processor will request under load is impossible to predict without loading the processor fully. The base level of voltage used will increase in accordance with the CPU multiplier ratio. It is therefore best to start with a low multiplier ratio and work upwards in 1X steps while checking for stability at each increase. Enter the OS, load the CPU and check CPU-Z to check the voltage the CPU requests from the buck controller. If the level of voltage requested is very high, then you can reduce the full load voltage by applying a negative offset in UEFI. For example, if our full load voltage at 45X CPU multiplier ratio happened to be 1.40V, we could reduce that to 1.35V by applying a 0.05V negative offset in UEFI."

 

 

 

I am trying to understand the highlighted passage. My base voltage is 1.2 and when I run full load, the voltage spikes to 1.45

 

I want the base voltage to be at 1.0 and voltage spike to go no more than 1.3. What do I do?

 

When I am in BIOS, do I keep pressing the "-" button on the "offsetmode sign" on this screen? The offset mode toggles between + and -. There is no value against it.

 

 

 

B2B.jpg

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The Offset Mode Sign tells the computer whether you want a positive or negative offset. Basically, you can add or subtract to the voltage ID (VID) and you use the + or - to choose which one. The way VID works is there is essentially a table of values programmed into the CPU that lists what voltage to ask for at given frequencies. For example, at 1.6GHz ask for 0.9V, at 3.4GHz ask for 1.1V, at 3.8GHz ask for 1.2V. When you set an offset you're adding or subtracting from that value.

 

For what you want to do, first work out the VID for your CPU under load, CoreTemp and I think RealTemp will tell you this value. Find the difference between the VID and 1.3V and that's your offset. The field below the Offset Mode Sign option, CPU offset voltage, is set to AUTO, which means the motherboard is deciding what offset to provide. You need to select this field and change it to your offset. Using the example in the OCN guide you've quoted you'd make the Mode Sign negative and type in 0.005 into the voltage field. Just another note - you can't control both idle and load voltages independently, setting the offset affects both.

 

Myself, I use a +0.100 offset for my 3570K at 4.7GHz, which takes Vcore to about 1.35V when running at full speed, and about 1.0V when idling at 1.6GHz.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Cheers,

 

Mike

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Allright Mike.. I think I got it. But let me ask you

 

First Q

 

The default cpu voltage before I started OCing was like in that screen shot .988. Mine currently is 1.2 ( This is at 1.6ghz..right?) How do I change that to say 1.0 like you have? And how did that value change from .988 to 1.2? Why is it starting so high?

 

Or tell me what are the things you did specifially for this to happen for you?

 

"Myself, I use a +0.100 offset for my 3570K at 4.7GHz, which takes Vcore to about 1.35V when running at full speed, and about 1.0V when idling at 1.6GHz."

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Have you overclocked, and have you fiddled with any of the power-saving options? Run CoreTemp or CPU-Z to monitor the CPU clock speed and make sure it's throttling when idle.

 

But my guess is that you've overclocked it and, with the option set to AUTO, the BIOS has decided on a rather large offset which, as I mentioned before, affects the idle as well as load voltages.

 

Cheers,

 

Mike

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Yes I used the auto overclock extreme using the ASUS AI II thingi... after that I went into BIOS and saw that it was set to 1.2 for idle and goes to 1.4+ when CPUs are fully loaded at 4.43Ghz

 

And yes...at idle its 1.2v

 

I don't like what the ASUS OC auto thing did. I want to reduce the voltage settings... But instead of manual set, I like the variable voltage thing and want to use this feature. But the bracketing of the voltage needs to be moved to the left... lower end.,'

 

 

There is no need for 1.2v for operating at 1.6Ghz. right?.

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Well if you used auto-overclock you shouldn't start messing with the voltages yourself. The ASUS utility has chosen 1.45V because that's what it reckons is the voltage the chip needs to be stable at load. If you try to change the voltages yourself it will probably lead to system instability. Blue screens and stuff. My advice would be to return the BIOS to factory defaults and the OC utility to stock settings, then overclock it manually through the BIOS. If you're set on using 1.3V my plan would be the following:

  • set a static Vcore of 1.3V
  • manually set the multiplier, I'd start around 4GHz, so 40
  • stress test it with Prime95 or something like it
  • if it's stable, go back into the BIOS and raise the multiplier by one then retest
  • when you get to an unstable overclock back off by one or two multiplier points, this is the fastest speed you can reliably get to at 1.3V
  • load the CPU at this setting and get the VID, then find the difference between this and 1.3V. This is your offset
  • go into the BIOS and set the offset. This will give you 1.3V at load, and ~1V or less at idle

You can leave all other settings besides the Vcore on AUTO. It won't net you the best overclock for that voltage, but it makes things a lot simpler. I reckon you'd get to around 4.4-4.5GHz doing this, higher if you have a good chip.

 

Cheers,

 

Mike

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load the CPU at this setting and get the VID, then find the difference between this and 1.3V. This is your offset

 

All right Mike..I'll do that this weekend and report back.

 

But I am not sure I understood the line about getting the VID. If I had set the voltage to constant 1.3 and when I load up the processors why would I still get a voltage other than 1.3? And if it does and that is the offset? How could I have an offset when I am using constant voltage?

 

Manny

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But I am not sure I understood the line about getting the VID. If I had set the voltage to constant 1.3 and when I load up the processors why would I still get a voltage other than 1.3?

 

The VID is separate to the voltage the CPU is actually getting. As I said, it's a table of values programmed into CPU that list what voltage to ask for at different frequencies. The VRM on the motherboard reads these values but doesn't have to provide the voltages listed therein. If everything is at stock settings, the VID will be used to work out what voltage to send the CPU, but once overclocked the VID is no longer useful. Why? Because the CPU isn't specced to run at the higher frequency so there isn't a matching VID for it. The VID will be whatever the highest value that was programmed into the CPU was, which may not be enough. If a CPU tops out at a turbo of 3.8GHz at stock settings, with a VID of 1.2V, and you overclock it to 4.8GHz the VID is still going to be 1.2V, and obviously insufficient. You have to manually tell the motherboard to give it a higher voltage, either static or an offset from the VID.

 

And if it does and that is the offset? How could I have an offset when I am using constant voltage?

 

You can't. But you don't automagically know what the VID is going to be when your CPU is loaded, it might be 1.15V, or 1.21V, or 1.23V, who knows? So rather than guessing an offset to get 1.3V you can set a static voltage, I said 1.3 but any voltage you know is stable will do. Place a load on the CPU, then get the VID. Then find the difference. For example, if the VID is 1.19V then your offset is +0.11V to get 1.3V. Now that you have the offset you can go into the BIOS and configure it in the settings instead of the static voltage.

 

Hopefully that answers your questions :Nerd:

 

Cheers,

 

Mike

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Hi Mike,

 

This is what I got

 

I did Vcore manual at 1.2

 

Manny%2520OC%25204400.jpg

 

Its pretty decent OC. The vid stays at 1.2v (The vcore displayed by CPUZ is the VID...right? I think I could increase the Multi by a notch or two and keep the voltage sub 1.3v.

 

Although I have the GSkill Trident 2400, the memory speed here is kind a low.. the DRAM Freq = 952Mhz

 

MAnny

 

I tried the Ratio to be independent and truned 0,2, & 3 = 42 multi and the 1 = 50 multi.and it booted fine...But when I ran FSX, the cpuz told me the multi = 38 (Standard). So not sure why that happened. I believe we should pursue this option of taking the single core alone way up and see the results.

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The vcore displayed by CPUZ is the VID...right?

 

No, Vcore is the voltage the CPU is really receiving. Try CoreTemp for a program that will show you the VID. Well done on the manual OC though.

 

Cheers,

 

Mike

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Yup..I downloaded Core Temp and there is the VID..and its slightly higher by .005 volt

 

BTW,,, I have upped the vcore to 1.225 and OC it to 4.5Ghz (44 mult x 103) and the VD is slghtly higher and the temp is below 80C under stress.

 

Manny

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Just some comparison stuff: I don't use the offset mode, as the vCore can go too high.

 

4.6 4.8 and 4.9

 

The pc has been at 4.9 for around a year now, without any sign of overheating - although it's probably time to get rid of some of the clag that it's sucked in!

 

Water cooled (hangover from the i7-950)

 

1 x Slim Triple 120mm Radiator XSPC RS360 (RS360).............$54.99

6 x Feser Tube UV Hose 1/2"ID-3/4"OD).........................$8.94

1 x FrozenQ FlexTank MP Reservoir - Black Acetal (QFTR-A).... $34.99

1 x Swiftech MCP 655-01 Pump w/ Speed Controller CP655-D501)..$77.99

1 x EK-Supreme HF Performance- Full Nickel Water Block........$89.99

6 x 1/2" ID Tubing - Barb - Matt Black (BP-MBWP-C01)..........$19.74

 

$286.64

 

The three i20mm fans continuously turn at their lowest rate, with ave. temps at 36C. (CoreTemp)

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