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shally17

Lapping the 3770K IHS

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Just wondering, since I am going to be de-lidding my i7 3770K to replace the intel TIM with liquid metal ultra, should I lap the IHS before delidding or after. I am thinking that lapping the detatched IHS would eliminate any problems with filings or water getting into the CPU. However I am not sure if the rigid support of the CPU is needed to lap effectively or even avoid bending the IHS.

 

Also does anyone have a good method for getting all of the old TIM off the die?

 

Any advice greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

Steve.

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I am thinking that lapping the detatched IHS would eliminate any problems with filings or water getting into the CPU

 

Your thinking is correct here. There's a bit of copper / whatever material removed and I hate to think about that goop getting on the LGA... and then having to clean it... better imo to not risk getting it dirtied up. I don't think anything could penetrate between the IHS and die.

 

As far as getting the TIM off the die... I am a big fan of ArctiClean. Stuff melts TIM goo (including what you asked) for easy enough removal and has a nice orangey scent to it. So Q-tips and ArctiClean.

 

The sealant between the die and the IHS is somewhat messy... I very carefully used the blade (double edge Feather razor blade) used to separate the die from the IHS (so now a single edge blade with electrical tape on the other side) to scrape off much of that material and a combination of ArctiClean and 91% isopropyl alcohol. Also used the alcohol / q-tips to finish up when most sealant residue was off.

 

I am not sure if the rigid support of the CPU is needed to lap effectively or even avoid bending the IHS.

 

The IHS is a sturdy hunk of metal... Intel should stamp some kind of something on both sides and sell as square souvenir coins.

 

-Rob

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I did mine after. You won't bend the IHS, it's made of pure copper and it's quite thick. Just apply nice even pressure on a flat piece of glass backing the sandpaper and you'll be fine. Have seen somewhere in the neighborhood of a 10 degree C drop under load in my testing thus far, also switched to Coollaboratory Liquid Pro from the "Ultra" product of the same family, Pro has no solid component and seems to be a better fit for lapped surfaces. Now happilly running Intel Burn Test "Maximum" setting @ 4.9GHz and ~1.44V hitting a maximum of 73 degrees on the hottest core.

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also switched to Coollaboratory Liquid Pro from the "Ultra" product of the same family, Pro has no solid component and seems to be a better fit for lapped surfaces.

 

Noted, so Liquid Pro is the way to go.

 

Thanks,

Dirk.

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