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Les Parson

Real Air Duke B60 - CHT (Cylinder Head Limitations) Limitations

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Greetings,

 

Hopefully,  a discrepancy can be answered re CHT limitations for the B60:

 

1.) Documentation (including the real-world B60 POH) indicate CHT limitation parameters as:

 

      "Normal Operating Range (Green Arc)...........121 to 232C

       Maximum (Red Radial)...................................246C"

 

2.)   The Cruise Checklist, item #4 (Real Air and real-world checklist are identical) indicates:

 

       "4. Cowl Flaps - AS REQUIRED (maintain 225C  cylinder head temperature or less)".

 

3.)   The real world POH Cruise Tables includes the following note:

 

         ""1. Extend cowl flaps as required to maintain cylinder head temperature at 246C or less."

 

This 21 degree discrepancy is significant as it often makes the difference of operating cowl flaps in the CLOSED or HALF position during cruise resulting in TAS and FF consequences.

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I'm glad you started this thread.  From watching a RW flight, it seems that a big part of flying one of these piston twins is temperature management...both TIT and cylinder head.  It'd be good to have this right.

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deleted by author.  In short, all I said is that I would most definitely stick with the 225C, inside the green arc, use the Real Air cruise power tables, because they appear to be xeroxed from the real world also, and finally, remember that those tables are really just an approximate based on ideal conditions, subject to signifigant deviations depending on a whole host of factors.   As long as all sources agree that the upper limit of the normal range is 232 for these engines, then I couldn't imagine that your particular cruise power setting table would assume that you are operating outside of that range, towards the redline.  There is a reason that it's called "normal operating range." :lol:

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