Sign in to follow this  
Guest daveg4otu

HERC landing on an aircraft carrier

Recommended Posts

We were watchin J.A.G. (Anyone know what it stands for?) and they said that in 1983, a C130 Herc sucessfully landed on an aircraft carrier. This was after the show ended and I think the show was about that incident. I think it is true. Anyone ever hear about it?JimCYWG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

On 08, 21 and 22nd of November 1963, A C-130F made a total of 21 full stop landings aboard the USS Forrestal(CV-59). The Navy was trying to see if the Herc could be used as a "Super" COD Aircraft. Unfortunatly no other aircraft could be on the flight deck. The tests were more than successful. At 85,000 lbs The C-130F came to a complete stop within 267 feet, and at MTOW used only 745 feet for take-off. The Navy concluded that with the C-130F it would be possible to lift 25,000 lbs of cargo 2,500 miles and land it on a carrier. However the idea was considered to risky and thus was born the C-2 Greyhound. The pilots were awarded the Distingished Flying Cross for the flights.Some video clips...Landing:

http://www.airandspacemagazine.com/ASM/Web.../QT/HercOn.htmlTake-Off: (Note: this clip is WITHOUT JATO assist, no mention anywhere I've read on the event that it was ever used.)http://www.airandspacemagazine.com/ASM/Web...QT/HercOff.html
:-outta
There is a fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness".- unknown
"My daddy gives me up, to fight for you"- a US Military Members Child

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I remember seeing that Lockheed promotional film when I did my Herc training in airforce.I was always more impressed with the sled launch of a Minutemanrocket out the back that features on the same film :-):-wavePete

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am attending the Hercules Operator's Conference here in Atlanta and can attest to the fact that a C-130 did in fact land and take off from a carrier. Though that was a feat, another that most folks don't know about is the modification of two C130's to land and depart from a patch of ground basically the size of a football field. By mounting rockets in strategic locations and having a synchronization system that controlled the sequence of firings (including a vertical set that allowed the pilots to do a full stall and basically descend to the ground from feet above), the pilots could land in a football stadium, clearing the stadium walls by 8 feet. Using different rockets and JATO packs, they could be airborne in 150 feet with a full load. The first of these modified B units (if memory serves me) was destroyed in tests, and the second was never used for its intended purpose (rescue of the Iran hostages from a downtown Tehran football field). The second bird was provided to a museum where it still sits.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Golly, now I remember that too. A soccer field I think? At the risk of flaming (haha, please dont) it does seem though that bringing in a 130 with rockets would attract a "little" attention. (for history buffs, T. Boone Pickens voluteered to rescue the hotasges with "merely" company employees).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once saw a herc take off using jet assist.... A really noisy affair to say the least and I am not sure of the purpose... But then one never questions the wisdom of the military, else maddness would soon set in...Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a look at this story of human error(an understatement) ----More like this at the Darwin Awards Website(Where I found this)athttp://www.darwinawards.com/darwin/darwin1995-04.htmlJet Assisted Take-Off 1995 Darwin Awards WinnerConfirmed Bogus by DarwinThe Arizona Highway Patrol were mystified when they came upon a pile of smoldering wreckage embedded in the side of a cliff rising above the road at the apex of a curve. The metal debris resembled the site of an airplane crash, but it turned out to be the vaporized remains of an automobile. The make of the vehicle was unidentifiable at the scene. The folks in the lab finally figured out what it was, and pieced together the events that led up to its demise. It seems that a former Air Force sergeant had somehow got hold of a JATO (Jet Assisted Take-Off) unit. JATO units are solid fuel rockets used to give heavy military transport airplanes an extra push for take-off from short airfields. Dried desert lakebeds are the location of choice for breaking the world ground vehicle speed record. The sergeant took the JATO unit into the Arizona desert and found a long, straight stretch of road. He attached the JATO unit to his car, jumped in, accelerated to a high speed, and fired off the rocket. The facts, as best as could be determined, are as follows: The operator was driving a 1967 Chevy Impala. He ignited the JATO unit approximately 3.9 miles from the crash site. This was established by the location of a prominently scorched and melted strip of asphalt. The vehicle quickly reached a speed of between 250 and 300 mph and continued at that speed, under full power, for an additional 20-25 seconds. The soon-to-be pilot experienced G-forces usually reserved for dog-fighting F-14 jocks under full afterburners. The Chevy remained on the straight highway for approximately 2.6 miles (15-20 seconds) before the driver applied the brakes, completely melting them, blowing the tires, and leaving thick rubber marks on the road surface. The vehicle then became airborne for an additional 1.3 miles, impacted the cliff face at a height of 125 feet, and left a blackened crater 3 feet deep in the rock. Most of the driver's remains were not recovered; however, small fragments of bone, teeth, and hair were extracted from the crater, and fingernail and bone shards were removed from a piece of debris believed to be a portion of the steering wheel. Ironically a still-legible bumper sticker was found, reading "How do you like my driving? Dial 1-800-EAT-####."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this