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Foxtrot_Sim

CPU Overheats While Rendering Videos

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Hello-

I am using Sony Movie Studio Platinum, and when I try to render videos (1080P), my CPU heats up to about 95oC! (then I shut off my computer to prevent overheating).

 

Why is this happening? I'm on an i7 4760K @ 4.4GHz 16GB RAM. 

 

Thanks.

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I'm struggling with your post TBH, firstly I believe you already know the answer to the question you're asking and secondly you are having an issue with your CPU overheating but haven't stated what CPU cooler you are using. 

 

To answer your question - video rendering can be one of the most CPU intensive processes commonly undertaken, the harder the CPU works the more heat it generates it is the job of the CPU cooler to dissipate this heat, evidently your CPU cooler is not performing as you need it to.

 

Information that would be useful -

What CPU Cooler are you using?

Has your CPU cooler previously been able to cope with this type of work or is this the first time you have stress tested / checked your CPU temperatures when under heavy load?

What voltage is your CPU running when under load (use CPU-z)?

Have you recently moved or knocked your PC in such a way that the seal between the cooler and CPU could have been broken, the cooler mountings been effected, or the Fan header loosened?

What speeds is your CPU Cooler fan spinning whilst idle and under load (download Speedfan if you don't have this information)?

 

Things to do - 

Open up your case and visually check the CPU cooler, is it firmly attached to the CPU, is there any dust build up that may be effecting performance, if you move the fan blades do they move smoothly without resistance, is the fan header securely connected?

Turn on the PC and listen for any noises coming from the cooler that might indicate a problem with the fan bearings.

If you are using one of the all-in-one liquid coolers beloved by folks on these forums (myself excluded) then you will also need to consider and check for mechanical failure of the pump, including listening for any noises that would indicate a problem and checking any monitoring software that came with it.

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To follow-up PieEater, it seems the two things most PC users tend to forget is that the two applications that will tax a CPU most, are processing video and sound files, hence the heat produced.

 

And, talking of CPU coolers, specially the older HSFs, I have lost count of the number I have come across clogged with dust. Same goes for intake and exhaust fans. Does not aid cooling.

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To clarify- I'm using a stock CPU fan. I'm running at 1.835V and my temps are in the 40's idle, as usual. I used an option in my BIOS to overclock the CPU a little, hence the higher clock speed. 

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To clarify- I'm using a stock CPU fan. I'm running at 1.835V and my temps are in the 40's idle, as usual. I used an option in my BIOS to overclock the CPU a little, hence the higher clock speed. 

 

OK - so if your are really putting 1.835v through your CPU I'm surprised it's still working, where are you getting this figure from? You should be looking at a figure between 1.20v-1.25v for a mild to moderate overclock on air.

 

Can I suggest you put your BIOS and / or Overclocking utility back to default until you get your cooling sorted. The stock cooler is just about able to cope with the CPU at stock speeds, it can't cope with overclocking as demonstrated by your high idle and load temperatures. You need to replace it, not just because you want to run an overclock but also because you are running highly intensive tasks such as video encoding, keeping the CPU cool will help prolong it's lifespan and will give you a more stable system.

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Well said, PieEater. Rock solid advice.

 

I'd go further to suggest that the OP looks into investing in one of the Noctua air coolers.

 

1.835v? Surprised his CPU has lasted this long on an o/c. I have o/c'd my i5-4670K to 4.2GHz and did not dare go past 1.20v. I use a Noctua air cooler that was the subject of many recommendations in an earlier hardware thread last year.

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I'm sorry guys if my description skills aren't up to par. The meter on my keyboard that measures CPU temp ways (99.93x 44.00) - 1.835V. I thought that was the volts. Anyway, I tried to render videos at a lower resolution (720P) and temp didn't get so high. 

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From the information you have provided you have been told that you are potentially damaging your CPU by putting far too much voltage through it and running it at the limits of its operating temperatures.You have been advised that your best course of action would be to reset your computer to default clock speeds and voltages to prevent further damage and to look at fitting an alternative cooling solution that would enable you to safely run at higher speeds. Ignoring this advice and attempting to reduce the operating temperatures by changing the workload of the CPU is your choice, but it is not one I can support.

 

Should you want advice on aftermarket coolers I suggest starting a new thread and including the following information;

Your budget.

Make / model of case.

Make / model of motherboard.

Make / model of RAM and number of modules installed.

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