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Guest jrewing

Air Malta 737 problems at Glasgow, Questions

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Hi,I have just read about the Air Malta 737 that had problems at Glasgow last night.Apparently it burst a tyre and was forced to circle the airport for 3 hours to burn off fuel before it could land again at Glasgow.I have 2 questions about this.1) Does the 737 have fuel dumping capacity?, and if so why did they not use it.2) Instead of circling an airport for 3 hours, why not continue the flight?, I guess its a saftey thing, just incase anything else was a problem, but they still had to stay in the air for 3 hours, where they could have had another problem anyway?.Dan.

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1. No.2. Where they were going, they may not have had maintenance capability. They may not have been able to reatract the wheel. It probably would not have been prudent to go somewhere in that condition.

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Man, thats bad for the pax, having to circle an airport for 3 hours untill you can land, not knowing if it is going to land safely, not a nice situation to be inDan.

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Why doesn't the 737 have fuel dumping capability ? Surely this should be standard for ALL airliners ?Chris Low.

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Hi ChrisActually this question has been asked a number of time in the industry. I became aware of it when the Aloha 737-200 had the failure in-flight of the top of the cabin.An commercial aircraft in the US is required to have a fuel-dumping system if the maximum take-off weight exceeds the maximum landing weight...ie the plane can take-off with more weight than it can safely and with. At least I think that is how I remember it.I have never flown the 737 so I am not familiar with its requirements as far as weight and wheel requirements.Hope this helps explain why...I am sure there are others more familiar with the 737 who might be able to answer your question.Tim--757

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Actually, I believe the requirement for a fuel jettison system depends on the climb gradient that the aircraft is capable of maintaining from a landing go-around shortly after takeoff at maximum weight. It does not have anything to do with landing gear strength.

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You could be right...it was one of those discussions from a long time ago....Tim_757

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Hmmm ....I think you're both right, depending on how the aircraft was certificated.John14 CFR 23.1001 Fuel jettisoning system. (a) If the design landing weight is less than that permitted under the requirements of Sec. 23.473(:(, the airplane must have a fuel jettisoning system installed that is able to jettison enough fuel to bring the maximum weight down to the design landing weight. The average rate of fuel jettisoning must be at least 1 percent of the maximum weight per minute, except that the time required to jettison the fuel need not be less than 10 minutes. ... 14 CFR 25.1001 Fuel jettisoning system. (a) A fuel jettisoning system must be installed on each airplane unless it is shown that the airplane meets the climb requirements of Secs. 25.119 and 25.121(d) at maximum takeoff weight, less the actual or computed weight of fuel necessary for a 15-minute flight comprised of a takeoff, go-around, and landing at the airport of departure with the airplane configuration, speed, power, and thrust the same as that used in meeting the applicable takeoff, approach, and landing climb performance requirements of this part. ...

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