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Guest bisinchi

Sitting in the Flight Deck

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Hello All -Just out of curiosity, what are the odds that regular passengers can sit in the flight deck during a flight? Did they even allow that before security was tightened? I'm flying to Philly in a few weeks, and I wondered what the odds would be the sit in the jump seat (if applicable).Just a random thought :-)Thanks,Rob S.Captain Delta VA737-800/900

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Hi Rob, I am no professional so don't go by what I say. :-lol Before 9/11 when I would fly commercial I could usually get a flight deck visit in flight, depending on the crew of course, sometimes they would allow a long visit sometimes very short. Now days though there is not that good a chance to get in, a few crews still allow this but it is rare and frowned upon. I have not flown commercial for some time, only a couple of times since 9/11 but pretty much they will only allow you up front after the flight is over. Sad that a few peoples hatred can ruin so much for so many people. Anyway, at least give it a shot, you won't lose anything by trying but be prepared for a chilly reception these days, on the other hand you might get lucky. Hopefully someone with more knowledge than me can give you a better answer.Take care,Philip OlsonI'm the luckiest man in the world, my girl friend has a yoke and rudder pedals! Eat your hearts out!http://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/supporter.jpg

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I figured that was possibly the case. I guess it doesn't hurt to ask then :-) .When my g/f and I flew to Orlando on an US Airways A320, they let me go right up into the Flight Deck before take off/pushback and sit in the FO's seat. The captain was extremely cool. Guess we'll have to see!Thx,-Rob

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Rob-Pretty much no chance "in flight" on a US flight. Currently we have even restricted pilots from other air-carriers from the flight-deck. To get a jumpseat now is no longer just a crediential check at the podium and a meet and greet with the Captain, but a long evolution confirming certificates, IDs and employment...and that includes FAA/NTSB and airline employees who have flightdeck authority through their position with the airline.Even before 9/11 the official policy was no-one on the flightdeck for in-flight tours - an off-shoot of the hijackings to Cuba etc in the 70's. Before push and after chocks WAS fine for guests as long as they didn't distract the crew.SOMETIMES if you catch the Captain at the gate prior to boarding you MIGHT be able to get to "see" the flightdeck during boarding. BUT that is real-rare now on most of the larger carriers.Please don't get upset at the crew...we(the airlines) are real "twitchy" now about most things security related. The amount of memos, bulletins, messages and stuff telling us about security related issues would choke a mule. And besides, we can't show off a part of the thing we love to do...Sit back, relax, enjoy the stale pretzel ("..which can be used as a floatation device incase of an inadvertant water landing...").Tim__757

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Tim -Thanks for the insight. It's too bad things are that difficult. But if it makes things smoother and safer, I'm completely satisfied. I guess I've always wanted to see the deck in action.Regarding the crew, I'd never get upset, I completely understand. I think the job they do is awesome. I can remember being a little itty bitty Tike, and being allowed in the cockpit of DC-10 during cruise. I never thought I'd want to ride in the front for a career someday! Cheers!Rob

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I was under the impression that there airline flights now required the cockpit door to be closed, latched, and have the security bar locked at all times when passengers are on board. I've ridden in the cockpit on flights before, on rare occassions they would do kind of a lottery type thing for children. Alas, those days are gone now. I try not to even bother with flying the airlines anymore, I feel too much like an imprisonned criminal to enjoy the experience of airports and airline flights anymore.----------------------------------------------------------------John S. MorganReal World: KGEG, UND Aerospace Spokane Satillite, Private 130+ hrs.Virtual: MSFS 2004"There is a feeling about an airport that no other piece of ground can have. No matter what the name of the country on whose land it lies, an airport is a place you can see and touch that leads to a reality that can only be thought and felt." - The Bridge Across Forever: A Love Story by Richard Bach

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Rob,these things are only handled in the USA so strictly. Outside of the US it is still possible to visit the flight deck during the flight. Just a few weeks ago, on a scheduled charter flight with a B738 to our summer holiday destination with a well reputaed charter airline, the captain invited all the kids and their parents to visit the flight deck in flight. Off course not only kids and parents used this opportunity to have a look into the cockpit. The same thing I experienced also last year with the same airline. And as I know from friends also tother charter airlines have the same practice (maybe it is easier for a charter airline - although a scheduled one - to check who is on board).Last year on a regular scheduled flight in Australia, one steward went throught the aisle during the flight and invited all the kids on board to have look into the cockpit. During this time (approx 20 minutes) the door to the cockpit was wide open, and actually not only kids but everybody, who was interested, could visit the flight deck during flight!I have not mentioned the names of the airlines indentionally, because I'm not sure, if they have violated a law.On airliners.net you will find lots an lots of inflight cockpit shots, done in non-US-airlines after 9/11. And believe me, most of these shots are not done by pilots.IMHO, by keeping pax. out of the cockpit, you cannot prevent anyone who seriously plans to attack an airliner from doing so. Maybe locking the cockpit protects from the weired actions of some lunatics, but these kind of people allready existed befor 9/11.Wolfgang

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Wolfgang -Interesting story. I figured charted airlines are probably more leanant to that. I totally agree with you though regarding keeping passengers out of the cockpit during flight, etc. Actually it is pretty scary knowing that there are people like that out there. Oh well, that won't stop me from traveling the world :-). I guess I'll do what my g/f suggests, muster up the $$$ and go to commercial flight school. Anyone hiring?? j/k :-)Cheers!Rob

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>these things are only handled in the USA so strictly. Outside>of the US it is still possible to visit the flight deck during>the flight.Last year I was lucky enough to get a jumpseat takeoff at O'Hare, on a foreign airline though.Martin767 fetishistIt's a lot like life and that's what's appealing

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Hi,It looks like it depends on the airline policy and the captain's policy too. But that may be internal to Europe, I'm not sure about oceanic crossing, but according to discussions I had with pilots from a major european airline, that seems to be still valid on transatlantic flight too (airline policy and captain's policy).Regards,Francois

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