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SAS263

Backtrack?

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Hi,A question for real life pilots? I read the following:"Like many others this bird overshot the intersection Alpha after landing on Rwy 26 and had to use the backtrack for a turn".What is a backtrack and how does the procedure work for the aircraft and pilots? How does it look like when you are watching the plane doing this procedure?Regards,Jeroen van SchoneveldVelserbroekThe Netherlandshttp://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/800driver.jpghttp://sales.hifisim.com/pub-download/asv6-banner-proud.jpgASUS A8N-SLI, AMD Athlon 64 4000+ (2,4 Ghz) San Diego processor, 2Gb DDR 400 Mhz Corsair Mem, ASUS V6800 PCIE Ultra 256 MB video

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backtracking means driving back over the runway (in the opposite direction you landed from or will take off from) to either get from the stopping point to a turnoff or from a runway entry point to the point where you will start your takeoff run.

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Ah,Just like at Kerkira. The plane taxies on the runway, turns at the end and then takes off, or, in this case, the plane lands at Innsbruck, cannot stop before the next taxiway, taxis to the end of the runway, turns and then taxis to the gate.First I thought a tug had to go to the airplane on the runway and towed it to the gate.Regards,Jeroen van SchoneveldVelserbroekThe Netherlandshttp://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/800driver.jpghttp://sales.hifisim.com/pub-download/asv6-banner-proud.jpgASUS A8N-SLI, AMD Athlon 64 4000+ (2,4 Ghz) San Diego processor, 2Gb DDR 400 Mhz Corsair Mem, ASUS V6800 PCIE Ultra 256 MB video

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it's commonly used around the world.Heard it used across Europe and in the Caribbean myself.

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Some Airports are not fortunate to have an extensive taxiway system usually one central and maybe a highspeed and pilot's (of bigger aircraft) either have to stand on the brakes and max rev to land short or simply ease her on down the line and do the U-Wee. The term "backtrack" is correct. In high-density airports this will be a very, very rare occurrence as traffic will be stacked for miles."Eastern 185 cleared to enter and backtrack RWY 10"Douglas B-707 Ret.

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Yup, we use the term "Backtrack" in Sweden when we taxi on a runway in use in a direction opposite to the landing or take-off direction. That is, if runway 34 is in use and I taxi "down" it towards the south then the term is used, e.g. "SE-ABC, taxying backtrack runway 34." Not sure if one could shorten that to "SE-ABC, backtracking runway 34." As long as there can be no mistake what I

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Not to beat a dead horse-but I have been flying in the US for 16 years and never heard the term "backtrack"-I am not disputing the term but I am curious.From the airtraffic control directory (FAA-US)and Airman's Information Manual Pilot Controller Glossary: www.faa.gov/ATpubs/PCG/B.HTM BACK-TAXI- A term used by air traffic controllers to taxi an aircraft on the runway opposite to the traffic flow. The aircraft may be instructed to back-taxi to the beginning of the runway or at some point before reaching the runway end for the purpose of departure or to exit the runway. There is no mention of the term "backtrack" at all.Not trying to dipsute it-I am just curious if this term is used everywhere but the US-or have I just missed it in 16 years of US only flying?!If so-it shows another challenge Fs programmers have on making everyone happy with atc! :-)http://mywebpages.comcast.net/geofa/pages/rxp-pilot.jpg

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Hi there! Well, the countries I have found official documentation regarding the term is Canada, Great Brittain and Sweden. Haven

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