Sign in to follow this  
bantha121

Fifth Pod Performance Data

Recommended Posts

As the title suggests, I was wondering if PMDG had any performance data related to flying with the fifth pod. I know that PMDG has accurately modeled the effects and I'm interested in doing a flight with it, but I haven't been able to find any information out there regarding shortened range, etc. 

 

Sterling Paulsen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

If they did, I doubt we would ever know. If you can't find it on the internet, there's probably a reason for it. The main place I'd look is the FCOM for any performance data. The data probably exists somewhere on the internet, we just don't know where to look though unless someone else on the forum happened to stumble upon it.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/26/2017 at 6:56 PM, Milton Waddams said:

If they did, I doubt we would ever know. If you can't find it on the internet, there's probably a reason for it. The main place I'd look is the FCOM for any performance data. The data probably exists somewhere on the internet, we just don't know where to look though unless someone else on the forum happened to stumble upon it.

 

The FPPM (Flight Planning & Performance Manual) is where you find all dispatch performance data for the Boeing aircraft.

 

On 8/26/2017 at 6:24 PM, bantha121 said:

As the title suggests, I was wondering if PMDG had any performance data related to flying with the fifth pod. I know that PMDG has accurately modeled the effects and I'm interested in doing a flight with it, but I haven't been able to find any information out there regarding shortened range, etc. 

 

Sterling Paulsen

 

Only two -400 operators opted for -400 fifth pod capability. South African Airways and Qantas. 

The SAA birds became Cathay -400BCF freightersm converted in Xiamen. Losing the fifth pod capability in the process.

Qantas still has the capability with -OJS/T/U. 

Note: all -400 fifth pod capable aircraft were RR powered. No GE/PW -400 operator ever opted for it, and hence Boeing never bothered to certify it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

to add there is at least one european freight operator using RR engines that choose that option.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 26/08/2017 at 6:56 PM, Milton Waddams said:

If they did, I doubt we would ever know. If you can't find it on the internet, there's probably a reason for it. The main place I'd look is the FCOM for any performance data. The data probably exists somewhere on the internet, we just don't know where to look though unless someone else on the forum happened to stumble upon it.

there is more than one user over here that have that data trust me .....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very few airlines carry out a B744 Spare Engine Carriage flight these days, although it was not considered unusual to conduct them in the early years of the B747 Classics.  ETOPS reliability requirements and advances in engine design, materials and real time monitoring have had a significant impact on engine and aircraft systems reliability.  So much so, that it is probably more likely for an engine to be replaced before it fails, or for a 3-engine ferry (i.e. non-revenue flight) to be conducted by a specially trained, minimal flight crew. Three engine ferry flights are outside the scope of this particular thread so I won't confuse matters with any details about them, except to say that the whole operation is tightly regulated and the take-off roll and initial climb out can be very interesting!

Detailed information for carrying out a Spare Engine Carriage is contained in the B744 Airplane Flight Manual or Performance Manual.  However, the FMC will provide you with most of the information you need to simulate a Spare Engine Carriage operation and this includes the additional fuel requirements data as well as the reduced operating altitudes and the speeds to fly. The maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) and maximum landing (MLW) weight are both reduced to allow for the aerodynamic drag and stresses as well as the additional weight of the podded engine under the wing.  In the case of the RR Pax 744, If you use a MTOW of 367.4 tonnes and a MLW of 276.7 tonnes you won't be far out. You will also need to apply some aileron and rudder trim in order to fly straight and you might even discover some extra airframe buffet simulated, especially if you fly too fast (this is perfectly normal).  Although the maximum range will be affected, it is not normally considered as the main governing factor for this sort of operation because additional fuel is calculated within the usual flight plan to allow for the extra fuel burn. 

Bertie Goddard 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this