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Guest allcott

Proper use of the clock somebody?

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Could someone tell me or direct me to instructions on just what the dashboard clock functions are & how they are used?I know this is a silly question for most of you and I have been simming for a very long time.Just never bothered understanding the function or use of the clock.Tried the help menu in FS and could not find anthing under clock.Thanks,Ron

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>Could someone tell me or direct me to instructions on just>what the dashboard clock functions are & how they are used?I>know this is a silly question for most of you and I have been>simming for a very long time.Just never bothered understanding>the function or use of the clock.Tried the help menu in FS and>could not find anthing under clock.Thanks,RonHello Ron,You are not on your own with your clock question. I have been an avid simmer now since FS2002, which I still have installed and enjoy along with FS9 and FSX. The clock only came to my 'Twiddling' attention in all three simms, when I thought I would try timing a flight from Nairobi to Cape Town in the Boeing 737-400, imported in to FSX from FS9. Clicking on the little buttons that surround the clock, I managed to 'zero' ok for timing purposes, but I am at a loss as to how to re-set the actual time. Used to have the same problem with watches when they were first digitized too.I'm sure one of the more experienced AVSIM pilots will come to our aid shortly on this one Ron, but until then, try clicking on at least two of those clock buttons, particularly the pointed one.

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I click "top left" button as I enter the runway. This starts the timer running. Seems to be the same with most addons. From the various tutorials I have read, this seems to be what's done in real life.

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Another use for the clock or any chronometer for that matter is that it can be used to make a standard rate turn. If you look at your turn coordinator you might notice that it says 2 MINS in there somewhere. What that basically means is that if you make a standard rate turn by banking the aircraft either left or right until the little airplane inside the turn coordinator has its wings lined up with the left or right white mark. Once you are executing a standard rate turn the 2 MINS notification means that if you maintain the standard rate turn it will take you 2 minutes for a complete 360 degree turn or that youre basically turning at 3 degrees per second. How is this useful? Lets say you're on a VFR flight but you dont have an instrument rating. Suddenly you spot clouds or bad weather ahead and before you know it it's too late and you're already inside IFR conditions. Since now you cant see anything outside your windows you may not know which way to fly to get out of the clouds BUT what you do know is that the sky behind you was clear and good for VFR. So you want to make a 180 degree precise turn to get back to VFR conditions but how can you tell youre making a precise 180 degree turn besides using your compass or DG(especially if you dont remember what heading you were on initially) You can use the clock or a stopwatch with the turn coordinator. Since a standard rate turn is 3 degrees per second you know that you will execute a 180 degree turn in 60 seconds.

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Thank you for that expertise.That is very interesting and nice to learn.It always amazes me what I learn on these forums.I would never,ever have made that connection.Something new every day.Thanks,Ron

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Just to add to this.. Look at this plate: http://www.naco.faa.gov/d-tpp/0702/06030VG16.PDFYou will notice a '1 min' indication inside a procedure turn. The clock is essential here. Not taking into account VOR's and other factors, you must use the clock to make the proper turn. You follow the course out (following the arrow flow in the circle) for 1 minute after established on the outbound leg of the turn. At 1 minute, you make a standard rate turn 180 degrees (again, the clock is key here) to linueup for approach. This aiport is a little tricky once you get close as you actually have to adjust heading once you are close to landing (it doesn't line you up perfectly), but the procedure is the same regardless. This is IFR stuff, but good to know even if you primarily fly VFR.Oh, and you will also notice times at the bottom of the plate. Those are again clock-critical as they indicate, among other things, a minimum at which you need to abort approach if you do not see the runway.

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The clock has as many uses as you want to find for them. I generally use the timer on the transponder for flight time, as I don't normally need to use that timer for anything else, leaving the permanently-displayed clock to handle the spot-needs such as the procedure turns, or anticipating a VRP or turning point.In navigation terms, the clock is an integral part of the navigation equipment, going all the way back to stopwatch and compass days when it was the primary form of aerial navigating but these days many of those functions have been taken ny GPS, which has many of those timer and countdown functions auto-displayed. Another use for the clock is to set a time for the change of fuel tanks. In real life I have a virating alarm on my watch which I use for fuel reminders, as the vibrating alerts me, without scaring my passengers. But I also automatically re-set the stopwatch whenever I change tanks, purely as a cross-check. Allcott

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