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bkeske

Carenado Stationair caburetor heat switch.

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Does any know where this switch is? It is cold and snowing today, and icing was developing, however, I cannot find where this switch is. I looked at the pdf and it is not there. Anyone know?

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I couldn't locate it myself in the stationair or comanche, so am using the "H" key to toggle carb heat on and off when the man pres drops.

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You are right. However, a few minutes after I took off during a snow storm, the engine pressure drops to zero and the fuel flow is down to less than 3 GL/H at full throttle. If the engine is indeed of fuel kind, then the modeling is wrong.

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That would be "Alternate Air" (Alternate Induction Air) that you refer to, Geof. The 206 has a fuel injected engine, thus no carb heat.On the single engine Pipers, they use the same carb heat lever, and in the same place to the right of the throttle quadrant for Alternate Air.As to the 206 and Alternate Air???? Couldn't find anything on it at Google, but I did not do a lengthy search either.I know on the Cessna 210 Turbo I fly (also fuel injected) that there is no Alternate Air control, and they both share a variant of the IO-520, and the "I" means Fuel Injected.The newest 206s have a Lycoming IO-540, which is still fuel injected.Now, one thing to check would be the aircraft.cfg file to see if the engine is listed as fuel injected or carbureted. Example:fuel_metering_type= 0 //0=Fuel Injected, 1=Gravity Carburetor, 2=Aerobatic CarburetorIf it is listed as "1" then change it to "0" and see how it goes.Not saying that Carenado made a mistake here (I'm friends with their Fernando Herrera- a real gentleman), but it is worth checking.Frankly, if they had it set wrong it would have been caught by them by now and fixed. :)Regards,http://www.dreamfleet2000.com/gfx/images/F...R_FORUM_LOU.jpg

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The Carenado 206 uses the IO-520-F so it is fuel injected but not sure about alternate air, although reading up on manual engine induction alternate air it describes what happens in FSX, a gradual loss of manifold pressure.I'm wondering if using the carb heat toggle on non-carb models toggles alternate air on or off? If so, it seems they may have it correctly modelled in FSX.And they do have it set to 0 for the fuel metering.Here's a direct quote from an article on the mooney 231:The first indication the 231 pilot has of of this phenomona is a "not so gradual" loss of manifold pressure (about 3"hg per minute). In the early 231's with the manual alternate air system, if the pilot doesn't open it as the engine (manifold pressure) begins to spool down, the engine will quit. If it's opened in time, the engine will be able to maintain about 70% power on alternate air alone. But pilots were not remembering to open the alternate air system. This answered why several 231 customers had descended without power, luckily into warmer air below that melted the ice on the filter and allowed for a restart before a forced landing was required (whew!).

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Looking online it seems the difference between the inertial separator and alternate air is the separator filters particles of dust/snow/ice prevent ice and snow from reaching the engine whereas alternate air is actual heated air that flows over the air filter in icing conditions.Didn't find much on inertial separation although it looks common to turbocharged aircraft and seems to be some form of spinning device which is placed at an air intake and filters particles away from the engine via tubes.

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So alternate air is still a heating device. Yeah, I can see during icing conditions, the air filter might be clogged up.

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>Depends on the plane. On the Baron it is just a spring loaded>door inside the nacelle that opens and lets air in from there.> As far as I know though-the air is unfiltered. I've never had>it happen so I am not totally familiar-a good thing...>My "experimental", has an alternate air door too. It's cable operated & has to be reset manually. I have a carb, and carb heat; but all the air comes in from a front air intake which gives it a ramming effect. The intake is only about 2 1/2" in diameter, and if a bird or ice blocks off the flow at the filter, then you can pull the door.The door lets slightly warmer cowl air come up through the bottom of a donut shaped filter, which is not filtering it.L.Adamson

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In FSX, the inertial separator doesn't do a whole lot that the sim pilot can see: it does draw a small percentage of your engine power, and you can watch the needles move when you engage it, and it slows down (or maybe stops) engine icing. I had to do a fair amount of searching to find out about it, so maybe there's more out there than I know of right now.Jeff ShylukAssistant Managing EditorSenior Staff ReviewerAVSIM

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Whether or not an aircraft actually has 'carb heat' or alternate air, or neither, I have to toggle it on/off a well (given weather conditions) with a couple of my aircraft when I sit and watch my manifold pressure drop dramatically.Seems to be a possible FSX/ASX/various aircraft designer issue, and outside the scope of realism.I simply use it...better than falling too far from the sky.

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