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Guest qvdg

DH82 vintage aircraft restoration -snapshots

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Hi all, The restoration of the DH82 Tiger moth by the FU3 Vintage aircraft restoration fund is progressing albeit they are struggling with a very tight budget of only 2000 polygon credits.Cheers, QvdG

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This is looking very good.I will not ask how many hours you have been working on this aircraft.Keep on with the good work.Maybe we can have a good old fashion "dogfight" with the Fokker" in the future?Lars Peter.:-wave

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Well done, Quentin. That is looking very promising. At least you have something that looks flyable now ;-)Chris Low,ENGLAND.

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Yes, I agree that having two sides to the plane is better. Are those screenshots taken over Bristol/Brize-Norton?A couple of points - the pilot looks excellent, but I couldn't see his scarf. Or goggles. - Where's the machine gun?(Was the DH82 primarily a fighter or an observation plane?)RobD.

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"The DH-82 Tiger Moth, despite its size, is indeed a legend. First flown in 1931, it became the flying club trainer of choice and then hit the big time after being chosen as the Royal Air Force's primary ab-initio trainer during the early thirties. During the Second World War, the Tiger equipped 78 Elementary Flying Training Schools spread around various continents. Rhodesia had four and South Africa had seven schools. Moreover, the aircraft operated in almost every major combat theatre for liaison and even medical evacuation.After the war, Tiger's were swiftly demobbed, many being piled into heaps and scrapped as there was no market for second hand examples. Its illustrious wartime service saw to it that survivors have become highly collectable items which now change hands for over US$40,000 for a pristine example. In South Africa, some 50 are still in existence with about 35 in flying condition.As an aeroplane, Tiger Moths were not particularly pleasant to fly. Whilst it was easy enough, to fly it well took considerable skill. Indeed, the Tiger was eclipsed by its opposition on the other side of the English Channel, in particular the B

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Quentin,Congratulations on the Moth! She's lookin' finer every day. Suddenly, together with Ansgar's latest triumph, the FU3 hangar is getting busy again ;)As to Dan's review, I can agree that they feel anything but solid to fly in! The flex in the rear fuselage section whilst flying has to be seen to be believed. Apparently one has to leave just the right amount of slack in the control cables to avoid strange interactions during flight :-eek When you land, after the wheels touch (and bounce a few times...) the wings flex all over the place and all the wires dance around! Once the wind is no longer under the wings, some wires go slack and she wobbles a lot.As far as 'wet concrete' goes, I'd liken it more to trying to ride a bicycle whilst sitting in an old wicker chair and steering with two ropes... :-lolThis is going to be a lot of fun :-wave Jon Point*************************(effyouthree@hotmail.com)*************************

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Hi Rob, It is actually over Bristol (you built the terminal building for me !) which I haven't yet finished as I been taken in by this aircraft building lark. The DH82 was in fact a trainer which was already outdated when it was pushed into mass production in order to train RAF pilots for ab inito training including instrument flying (hood fitted to rear cockpit) who went on to fly Hurricanes and Spitfires to save old Blighty from invasion. de Havilland sold many to Persia which where more or less armed with mg and bombs but this was not a standard configuration. Many where built in Australia and Canada. I once had the chance to fly passenger in one in Robe South Aus where we did some basic aerobatics and this is one of my most memorable aviation experiences. There is an excellent book called "Tiger moth ledgendary biplane trainer" which I am currently reading at the moment Closer to home my father told me many years ago that a guy called Vern who owned the Sandy Bay Jet service station had one and flew pleasure flights and photographic surveys over southern Tasmania.For our DH82 the pilot will have googles and will be extremely handsome chap (photo taken from my Robe experience). I don't know about the scarf as I still have to find some polygons for the air frame !Cheers, QvdG

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Thanks Jon, Once I have beaten this poly limit problem and have a reasonable model I will need some pointers on building control surfaces and on this texturing business, uv mapping.....The first livery I will be looking at is the classic canary yellow trainer with RAF markings. Then cockpit design, flight modelling and only then we will be able to do some fun hedge hopping !This will leave Rob and others sufficent time to built some nice UK fields like Kenley to fly the old girl out of, and of course plenty of hedges to be hopped ;-)Cheers, QvdG

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ah-ha, I'd been wondering about that TigerI'm sure I've seen it in 'the pattern' (trans-atlantic phrase)at Bristol :-lol:-wavePete

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Hello Quentin,you also learn fast ... as we all can see! Come on .... that little polygon hint is no real problem for you: ;-).... that bird has only one engine and not four! A few tips saving every polygon you didn

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Hedge-hopping - where did I put my old WW1 book collection! I made the first hedge for FU3, but Jon makes the best. Chase him - tell him we need a special order of Yew, roughcut and toptangled, 3 to 6 m height, lengths 10, 30 and 50 m, to be delivered by sundown.But he'll probably tell you he's too busy gliding. These glider types. Pah! Humbug.RobD.

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Too busy?Yes, but I have been using modelling to give me a break from the endless enjoyment - er sorry, hard work of glider testing :-lol Once I upload the beta, I have quite a few new models to upload as well. 4 hangars, a hayshed (with hay), 2 more power poles, a portaloo and 3 different fuel tanks.As for the hedges, send me a snapshot or ten. Hedges are about a 2 minute job really. The only trick is finding nice textures. My existing hedges were done using Corel's 'texture sprayer' using various leaf textures (in about 1 minute & 20 seconds). They're passable, but not great. A few good shots and we can have something realistic ;)Any offers? I'd also like some real stone wall shots to fix up my stone walls. All the shots I have are useless as they are taken at weird angles or weird light.PS You'll all be glider types soon - at least for a couple of flights anyway ;):-waveJon Point*************************(effyouthree@hotmail.com)*************************

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