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Manny

User training. FMC Use

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When I am in the FMC Rte or Legs page,I dont always see the with STEP thingi next to the legs like here. (I took this pic from another post)Clicking on RTE or LEGS page and next page does not do it.http://forums.avsim.net/user_files/141745.jpgAm I doing something wrong. I have seen it once. I am sure its all explained in the manuals. But if you know it, please tell me.Thanks.Manny

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you need to be in PLAN mode to use the step through WP feature

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Hi Manny,As Paul stated you need to be in plan mode.To get into plan mode you just use your ND mode selector located on your EFIS-MCP.Right click to change it from MAP mode to PLN mode.Michael

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Oh yeah... Indeed.Thanks. I am glad I asked instead of being shy about it. :)MannyBTW.. I know t/d (top of descend) and t/c (Top of climb). But what it t/s?Hmmmm....

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May I ask where you've seen "T/S"? I don't recall seeing it, but I've been wrong before....

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Hi Manny, good to see you're getting proficient on the 744 now, I hope it's as much fun as you expected!Not familiar with 't/s' on the ND but you'll see 's/c' on longer flights. 's/c' means 'Step Climb' which represents the FMS-determined point at which you should climb to a higher flight level to improve your fuel burn. This is determined by the calculated optimum altitude, which increases as the aircraft gradually lightens due to fuel use over the course of the trip. Under normal operations the aircraft will plan the s/c points to make a 4000 foot climb each step. Once the Optimum level is about 2,000 feet above your current cruise level it will be time to step up 4,000 feet.On a fully loaded flight of 12 hours for example, you'd expect to cruise at FL310 initially, then step to FL350 and maybe FL390 if the route exceeded 13 hours. (Rule of thumb of course!)You can also change the Step Climb increment to a specific value, say 2,000 feet for RVSM flight ops.Hope this helps.

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Thanks Mark. Yeah..its probably s/c that I saw. :) Roger about the Step climb.Oh yeah.. I am having lots of fun. In fact.. this is the only plane I have been flying ever since. Well this one and the F/A-18E hornet that I was playing around with yesterday.I have the basic concept of the thing 744 down pat. The only thing I am still not that comfortable with is..is the VNAV and when it takes the altitude that I give in the MNC and when it takes the input from the FMC. Its not that intutive. And the speed too. I don't know what source it uses at any point in time.I can either auto fly the whole thing nicely...or I can manually hand fly the 744. But in real world or with ATC, I would need a combination. Meaning, Yeah... I have a plan, but the ATC (AC4 here for e.g.) may vector me around... and then they say "Own Navigation". then suddenly vector me around to avoid traffic etc... Someimes I get stuck.. I feel its not doing what I want it to do. 99% pilot error here ofcourse. I want to do Hold's, Missed approach procedures and alternate airports, VOR Approaches using VNAV.But I am getting there...Manny

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You're sure right. Vnav's the toughest part. The AFS (Auto Flight System) uses the MCP vs FMC altitude to protect the airplane from . . . well, the pilot. (At least this will be one entertaining way to look at it!) During climb, the AFS will not climb above the MCP's altitude. AFS realizes there will probably be altitude constraints during a climb scenario and just wants to make sure the pilot stays involved. It does this by making the pilot dial in intermediate altitudes into the MCP. AFS then refuses to climb above that MCP altitude until the pilot reaches up and dials in a higher altitude. Again, it then will only climb to there. Then, each the pilot selects a new altitude (with Vnav engaged), the climb happens in the pitch mode VNAV SPD. This intermediate altitude is then captured in the pitch mode, VNAV ALT. The FMC has calculated altitudes that the airplane can economically (

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