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Getting The 182S To Climb!

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OK, I give up. I've been trying to get the Cessna 182S to climb to FL 110 and it just gives up as if it has no power and stalls. I have everything trimmed well I think and I start off nice at a climb rate of 500 fpm and 80 kts airspeed. As I get to about 7000 ft, my airspeed starts to go down to about 60. I try prop control, mixture, and even let the autopilot try with a vertical speed of 500 fpm. I still can't seem to get a decent climb speed of 80. I thought the Cessna performance specs allow for FLs above 10000. I don't seem to have a problem at 4000 or 5000 ft, just above. What am I doing wrong? I follow the checklist. Thanks. :-hmmm

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Has to be the mixture, even though you've mentioned it. At around 6000' the MS models really need to be leaned aggressively. Pull the knob back until maximum rpms are achieved (leaning), and then push slightly forward. There are different "leaning" proceedures, but this should be a start.L.Adamson

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Even the Concorde can't fly to 110.000 ft.:)Sorry couldn't help it.are flaps up?trimmed right?mixture,of course.Good luck, Steve

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First of all there is no FL110. Flight levels don't start until FL180. As LAdamson already said, try leaning. I believe the recommended leaning procedure in the C182 is to run 50

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Steve Small's 182 FDE handles quite well - you still need to lean her out, or she'll peter out on you around 7K. DreamFleet's 177 is also joy to fly - although she still won't stall or spin quite to my liking. Fly! was unique in this regard because you could model individual wing surface dynamics independently. Anyway...

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KLM781, initial climb FL60. Heard about once a week on Schiphol tower.Transition level here is 4500 ft (or 6000 ft sometimes. Don't know who makes that decision on what grounds but it is variable).If FS ATC doesn't know this, that's not to say it doesn't work like that in reality (last time I checked FS was the somewhat simplified simulation of the real world, and not the other way around).

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>DreamFleet's 177 is also joy to fly - although she still >won't stall or spin quite to my liking. Fly! was unique in >this regard because you could model individual wing surface >dynamics independently. >Getting a bit off subject, but I personally feel that the stall/spin characteristics of the SF260 are an improvement over what was accomplished in FLY. I was never happy with the amount of "time" that it took for a reaction to dropping a wing at the begginning of a spin, or a snap roll manuver. FLY litterly took seconds which gave too much time to think about it. It just never seemed real. I even re-loaded the Decathlon/Citabria on the newer CPU after using the Marchetti SF260 for comparisons. Whatever Rob had to do with FS2002 to "fake" wing dynamics has worked rather well! :)L.AdamsonP.S. ---- after watching the Discovery Wing's channel "A Plane is Born" last Sunday, (taped in the U.K.)........ in which they were spinning the Archer for flight training, I figure we might as well have all our simulated Cessna's and Piper's spinning here in the States too! :) I never did spin an Archer in my PPL training because it wasn't required. Did many later on in a Pitts S2B; but what the heck, let's get the "spam cans" spinning!!

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Off topic a bit but I must add a bit :-)I'd spun every aircraft I'd flown until I moved up to twins. The UK now has the same "teach stall avoidance, not spinning" philosophy as everywhere else so I guess that spinning will become a lost art over here in the future.I only refused to spin one aircraft and that was the AA1. Mainly because I was shown a paragraph that read "If you spin this aircraft let us know what happens, because we didn't."I never did find out if that bit was typed out by one of the other instructors or whether it was a genuine American Aviation statement. :-)Fun days..

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>First of all there is no FL110. Flight levels don't start >until FL180. Funny, by Boeing FM tables show FL's 0, 50, 100, and on up. Ron

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Try out Rob Young's flight model for the default 182S. http://www.realairsimulations.com/download...2_freeware.htmlI was able to climb to 11,000 ft. with no problems using Rob Young's FDE. Started my climb at 700 fpm at a speed of 115 with only 50% fuel. When I reached 7,000 ft. I leaned the mixture some and reduced my climb to 500 fpm still holding a speed of 115. Once I started to reach about 10,000 ft. my speed only dropped down to 105. When I finally leveled off at 11,000 ft. I was able to get the speed back up to 120. Rob

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Let's just say it's not proper terminology to say FL110 here in the USA. ;-) Oh and to the person who sad FL110 was 110,000 feet, you are also wrong (Sorry couldn't resist) ;-)If that were the case I would have been flying at 370,000 feet last night on VATSIM ;-)))

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>The UK now has the same "teach stall avoidance, not >spinning" philosophy as everywhere else so I guess that >spinning will become a lost art over here in the future. I flight instruct in Canada, and we are CONSTANTLY under pressure from Transport Canada flight training to teach the spin. It is not a flight test item on the Private Pilot level, but it is still an item that must be taught, and revisted on a constant basis throughout training. As for teach stall avoidance, its different here in Canada as well.. we teach the full entry to a stall, and the recovery... Power on, and power off stalls are both covered. The only time actual stall avoidance is done on a flight test is during a PPC ride where at the first signs of buffet or the stall horn you recover. You let the plane actually stall on a PPC and its over. On any other ride including Private, Commercial, and Multi, its a full stall and recovery.On a side note, in Canada the spin entry and recovery is an item on the Commercial flight test. Canada has some of the toughest standards for flight training.

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Correct me if i'm wrong.FL starts at 18000 ft which is FL180.last night you we're at FL370:37000 ftNot 370 thousand ft.So if FL starts at 18000 in the US and Canadaflying at FL110 would be 110 Thousand ft.Right Anyone?

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Correct..flightlevels start at 18000 (where Class A Airspace starts) but that doesn't stop you from saying you are at 18 thousand feet. FL110 would be 110,000 feet.Chris

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>FL110 would be 110,000 feet.No it wouldn't. It's 11,000'. FL1100 would be 110,000'. Altitudes are refered to as FL above the transition altitude, and become useable for flight at and above the transition level. In Canada and the US TA is always 18,000', however most of the world it is lower and varies among countries. So what's important is not 18000', it's QNH and QNE. Graham

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Since our C182s is free, I am able to plug it shamelessly. It comes also with custom made metallic textures which make a nice diversion from the default textures (and you can use these as well with our flight model).Our C182s has MUCH smoother pitch control, more harmonised controls generally, and can SIDESLIP, which the default just cannot do. (Please note you must set flightmodel realism to maximum to achieve this.You'll find our version can climb well and keeps climbing far above the default without collapsing - though it does help to reduce mixture after about 3-4000 feet.Feedback welcome.You can download the C182s from www.realairsimulations.comRegards,Rob Young

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Rob,I've recently downloaded your C182S awhile ago and have flown it a few times since then. I have to say you did a great job on the flight model. The C182S flies very smooth, much better than the default flight dynamics. Like I mentioned in my reply above, I was able to get it to climb to 11,000 ft. without any problems and I could have climbed even higher. The metallic textures look pretty sharp too! :)Rob

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First of all.Rob i haven't tried yours yet.So i'm defenitely not knocking it.I just climbed the default 182S to 17200 ft.Took a long time after 15000,i could only climb @200 fpmand after 16000 was down to 100 fpm.And no i didn't slew.Original,untweaked everything.Here's a couple shots.http://3db6f6ae11b7c8c6.jpghttp://3db6f6c812297658.jpg

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Another little item to add is that there is a setting bug on the EGT gauge. The "u" key selects it and "+" and "-" increase and decrese it. It's a good way to watch your power output during higher altitude climbs.CF-AOA

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Thanks for all your posts. I forgot to mention I am using the Realair 182. I had a problem with the rpm reading in reverse when using the prop control. It solved the problem for me. I just haven't tried higher than 5000ft or so till now. That's when I noticed the sluggish climb and stall. I'll try tweaking the mixture more and see if that helps. Sorry for causing such a stir with FL110. Regards, Tom :-wave

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