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Guest davewins

landing too easy??

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I am not a pilot so I truly have no idea how landing small aircraft is but I don't think it's that easy. I fly mostly small aircraft in FS so far and with settings maxed I still find landing too easy. In both FSX and FS9 I can just about land any small plane with ease. I want it to be more challenging and more real. Maybe I should just step it up to jets?? To anybody that flies small aircraft in real life what do you think about this?? Thank you.

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Set realism at MAX and land at a narrow runway no longer than 2500ft. I won't seem that easy anymore. Landings in FS9 and in real life are...kind of different. But I wouldn't say that one is necessarily easier than the other.

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realism settings to max, and I suggest you check out the jets, props are much easier to land!

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What is your weather settings? Have you tried a crosswind. I have a few hours logged in a real C-172. Landing in calm/no wind is a lot different that with a gusty crosswind....

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"I am not a pilot so I truly have no idea how landing small aircraft is but I don't think it's that easy. I fly mostly small aircraft in FS so far and with settings maxed I still find landing too easy. In both FSX and FS9 I can just about land any small plane with ease. I want it to be more challenging and more real. Maybe I should just step it up to jets?? To anybody that flies small aircraft in real life what do you think about this?? Thank you."For me, landing is much harder in MSFS with anything other than a dead calm for a number of reasons. First, no seat of the pants feel--it helps, especially when in crosswinds. But the biggest factor for me is peripheral vision--unless I distort the view ahead by using a zoom of .5x or so, I don't get the same sense of peripheral vision that I do in the Light Sport class aircraft I have been flying. I consider a forward zoom of about 1.3x or so the closest to matching the real perspective I see in the cockpit on final, but in MSFS this all but kills peripheral vision. Don't get me wrong--real life landings present challenges and require focus. But in terms of visual references it's still easier for me--other than the "omigodwhatifImessup" factor that flying something that costs real money with real souls aboard has :)-John

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considering that my peripheral vision hasn't been the greatest, my real world flight training has always had me landing using the END of the runway for all my cues. This is a significantly different feel to those who use peripheral vision for drift cues, but the end result is that it translates faster into FS. I've found I can stick and rudder 15knot crosswinds on FS no prob in my little 172.I've also found that positioning of the monitor is a BIG deal. I had my monitor up really high in one rig a few months back, and found I just plain COULDN'T land it. I rearrange some things, get my monitor back to just a little below eye level, and voila! Landings! It took me about 5 flight hours to get comfortable with landings, now, I'll go out and take just about any small aircraft, as long as you give me time to get used to it's slow flight characteristics, I'm happy, in FS, or out-Brian

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Track IR enhances peripheral vision a lot..But landing a 2000 meter long runway isn't that hard with a single engine. But try landing that same runway with a twin prop and left engine failure..makes the experience more interesting indeed.Try landing a single engine prop on a dirt strip. In real life, dirt strips or grass strips are hardly notable or recognizable from above. some scenery addons do replicate in a sense that experience like photosceneries (Megascenery PWN) or they are steeped/slooped (LLH scenery stuff like CourchevalAdd in some nice weather with gusting winds, low visibilty, chop, crosswind. So you see there are a lot of challenges for landing. Rea life is most of the time not fair weather and 340/0 :)Good flying!Rob "Holland&Holland" de Vries http://fool.exler.ru/sm/fly2.gif"To go up, pull the stick back. To go down, pull the stick back harder"

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Hi,I too flew normally at the ground in small planes- now I fly into the ground; into nearby shrubbery; into mountains that suddenly appear out of a 2 mile vis setting, in a large jet which has no GPS and in fact haven't managed a sensible landing yet. You want to create problems for yourself?! As the poster above suggested-set a crosswind and shear and try again!!In real life I have had 1 lesson!:-lol Andy.

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Outside of what Andy just wrote above the bottom line is flying's not as hard as it seems... :-)The only difference I've experience outside of the peripheral viewpoint is the feeling of flight you only can get from a real aircraft.

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Well if landings are easy, then you have now your FS licence. Upgrade to the real stuff now..JohanA LITTLE LESS CONVERSATION, AND A LITTLE MORE ACTION PLEASE

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I'm working on it I'm working on itChecklist to cert:Flight Training: checkRegister to take Written: checkTake Written: checkPass Written: PendingIn light of above stated situation, these were added--Re-Register to take Written: check--Re-Take Written: PendingTake Flight Test: PendingPass Flight Test: Fingers CrossedWait for Certificate to arrive in mail: Pending previous items:D All in all though, there's nothing like flying a single engine plane and trying to land it, without the engine, in a 14 knot crosswind... SOLO!

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Landing IS easy! It's made to be that way. Unless you are flying in bad weather with shifting winds, xwinds, windshear or microbursts its cake.It is no different in a jet either. Its like driving, if you don't know how to drive, it's hard...if you do its easy. If you know how to drive you can do so at 180mph and its just as easy.My suggestion, try more challenging weather situations, 0/0 vis, winds, storms, etc...

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Well, actually, there is something better than the crosswind, landing a 747, like a PMDG one, with all procedures, after a long boring flight.. utter boredom, suddenly shifted to utter terror. Mix in FS passengers and you know the thrills.Check this: http://www.avsim.com/pages/contrails/contrails_ott3.shtmlJohanA LITTLE LESS CONVERSATION, AND A LITTLE MORE ACTION PLEASE

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Ah yes... I've done that... not to mention had Engine 2 and the Right Autopilot fail on me half way through the flight... And the First Officer developed a coma when I could have really used his help :( (Seriously on the first officer part, guy passed out on my bed just as we were beginning the descent, then the failures hit, I tried to wake him, but to no avail!)

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Landing in real life is supposed to be very very easy and simple to do.

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Hi Dave; Go to Rolla Downtown...go into weather..advanced weather...set windsto 315 deg 15 gusting 25. Enable turbulance and wind shear...do a couple of touch and go's and let me know if it's too easy.:-lol And whatever you do always remember...Takeoffs are optional, butlandings are mandatory. :-badteeth

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My flight instructor said..oh you need about 5 hours to learn to fly, but about 25 hours to do proper landings in most circumstances...:)Rob "Holland&Holland" de Vries http://fool.exler.ru/sm/fly2.gif"To go up, pull the stick back. To go down, pull the stick back harder"

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"To go up, pull the stick back. To go down, pull the stick back harder"But I don't wanna diiiiiiiieeeeeeeeeeeeee! :(I love that line though, it's good.Kinda reminds me of the one flight...CFI: To go up, pull back gently, to go down, let off some power.ME: Won't that end with me at idle power and us falling out of the sky?CFI: Why, you expecting a rollercoaster?

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If you think landing is too easy, try landing the Captain Sim F-104 on a short runway. It's a riot, but it ain't easy.

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Get the RealAir Spitfire, and go for the perfect landings with little or no bounce. It's challenging & requires some good throttle management, as well as proper approach speeds.I think many of ther replies in this thread, are over simplification. When you're a student pilot, you'll be doing landings, after landings, after landings. If a "proper" landing was so easy right off the bat, then all these landings after all these years would hardly be nessesary.Just because you might hit the ground with three wheels at once in FS, and survive, it doesn't mean it couldn't do some nose gear damage or cause the airplane to bounce and then need to be recovered gracefully in real life.As a student pilot, you also learn "sight pictures", which include the flying attitude of the aircraft, as you trim in a nose down condition with airplanes such as a Piper Warrior or Cessna 172, while making that turn to base. You'll also have another sight picture of the aircraft in the final moments of flare, to keep the nose gear from hitting the same time as the mains.Some airplanes will require power on approaches, or extra (possibly excessive) airpseed to keep the nose from dropping out from under you in the final moments of the flare. I use the term excessive airpeed, because it depends on what you're doing. If you're bush flying and the runway is short, and the plane isn't a 172 floater, then you use power to keep from dropping until the right moment, and keep airspeed minimized to keep the landing roll short. And then there is variations to this.As a general rule, FS isn't showing damage, but yet it's capable of simulating proper landings, which require smooth throttle & pitch adjustments to maintain proper approach speeds and descent angle to the runway. Just flying it onto the runway means little, since the simulated tires don't blow, the firewall doesn't buckle, and the gear doesn't collapse.I wouldn't want simulators to get the idea that it's "that" much of a cake walk the first few times around. L.Adamson

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A real good way to land and to experience the consequences of landing (whether good or bad) is landing Digital Aviation Dornier 27 and looking at the maintenance log...;)Rob "Holland&Holland" de Vries http://fool.exler.ru/sm/fly2.gif"To go up, pull the stick back. To go down, pull the stick back harder"

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We ultimately are splitting hairs here. It takes a long time to learn to land WELL in a sim as well... Not to mention that after learning to land in FS, I went and on my first flight was able to land the plane with no instructor input (except he kicked the rudder at the last moment cause I wasn't handling the crosswind well). I will not say it was a good landing, but it was a landing, and no aircraft damage resulted. Within 10 hours of flight time I was up flying solo (had prolly 30 landings under my belt at that point). My first solo landing wasn't graceful either (You know how you can get nervous and forget EVERYTHING you learned about that runway not being there to kill you etc etc, yeah, HIGH!) But I landed it, and no aircraft damage, on takeoff, I had an engine failure, landed it, no aircraft damage (engine was fuel starved due to a bad fuel selector).Landing isn't a cakewalk, in FS or RL and yes, if you turn crashes on and set crash realism to max, FS is pretty picky about landing, heck, I had one landing in FS that seemed pretty smooth but it called it a crash, I found out later that I had a vs of -500 and landed all 3, but that's the kind of thing it takes to break a small plane. I've landed a warrior on all 3, and I've bounced more than my fair share of warriors, they aren't made of glass like your instructor tries to tell you. Though it's not a bad idea to treat them like they are, it just means you won't be pushing the edges of your flight envelope (honestly, never a good idea anyways).-Brian

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