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emiliocardenasr

Using FsNav as Autopilot.

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Have you tried clicking on the aircraft icon at the top of the setup page?Here you can chose a similiar - if not exactly the same - aircraft and use the settings associated with it.It may be that whatever is the "default" is, those settings are being used rather than what you are entering.That is only a guess however as I have never experienced what you are describing and have used FSNav for several years.Opa

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Are you loading a flight plan into FSnav and flying it? If so, see above post, it's using climb numbers for a different aircraft and trying to reach the EOC based on that aircrafts speed and climb numbers. If you are using an Aircraft that doesn't have certain parts of the autopilot, i.e. V/S hold, ALT hold, YAW, even though the option is in FSnav, it won't work. Usually FSNav notices and grays them out, but not all the time. And as you know, the higher you get in your 206, you will have to cut your climb rate back, just because the engine isn't producing as much power depending on how high you are going. I've experienced this problem in Carenado's 206 also, but it was only a matter of adjusting my climb rate en route.

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be sure u are not telling the ac to be at a fix, that cannot be achieved at 5oofpm in the distance to that fix. if u understand what I mean

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The root of the problem is that each aircraft profile in FSNavigator only has a single Climb Rate / Descent Rate value, and, as has been mentioned above, towards the top of the aircraft's achievable altitude the climb rate has to be reduced, often to a small value. In many cases the aircraft altitude "ceiling" is defined by a climb rate of 50 feet per second or less. The value set in FSNavigator has to be some sort of compromise, as you can usually climb faster than the set value at lower altitude and need to climb slower than the value towards the aircraft's ceiling. In prop planes you also need to consider leaning the mixture if it isn't turbocharged etc.At the higher altitudes you have to trade climb rate for airspeed, and what you're seeing when the planes stall is the autopilot (FSNavigator) attempting to maintain the set climb rate and thus slowly bleeding off the airspeed until you reach stalling speed.Within FSNavigator you have the option of allowing it to act as a full autopilot (all parameters set to automatic) through to full manual control where FSNavigator does not control the plane but simply acts as a moving map.In the case of the C206 you may be better off setting the options mostly to manual and maybe only fixing the desired altitude, then controlling climb rate and airspeed manually by use of the throttle and/or trim.Alastair

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FSNav is not designed to function as an autonomous autopilot system although it can control the autopilot of FS2004 (if that is what you are using) through a flightplan that you build and load in FSNavigator. You can't just take off and then expect FSNav to engage your aircraft in automated flight without a flight plan for FSNavigator to manage (i.e., "FLY FP" function.) I am assuming you are aware that in the classic automated flight mode, you activate your FS autopilot and also the FLY FP function so that the two operate together, in tandem.If you do fly with a valid FSNav flightplan, then you need to check the settings of every individual aircraft --or edit the aircraft dialog box and create settings--that you know your aircraft is capable of adhering to. So it is vital that you know the average vertical climb rate each aircraft in your own fleet can handle as well as climb speed and cruise speed, and also your average descent rate. Beyond this, in a prop, you will have to watch out for mixture and prop speed and manage those items as well even in auto flight mode.One important factor also is whether your aircraft even has an autothrottle capability ("A/T"). Not all GA aircraft have an AT function and if your Carenado does not have it, then you need to manage the power and speed yourself at all times.I've used FSNav for nearly 10 years and it's never let me down in automated flight unless I made a mistake in which case the flight suffers from the classic "operator error" we all have experienced from time to time.Hope this post is of some use to you.JS

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