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Ultrasweatproof

Proper Dial-a-flap setting.

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Hey guys. I'm almost ready to go for my first flight on the MD-11,...but how do i figure out what the right dial-a-flap setting should be for a 460,000lb takeoff? I've looked over the tutorial and the FMS documents but I seem to be missing how to determine the proper setting. Thanks.

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Try to search this forum on the terms flap and dial and you'll find your answer.

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Hey guys. I'm almost ready to go for my first flight on the MD-11,...but how do i figure out what the right dial-a-flap setting should be for a 460,000lb takeoff? I've looked over the tutorial and the FMS documents but I seem to be missing how to determine the proper setting. Thanks.
I asked this question along time ago and I can tell you this much...one former MD capt told me..we didn't use it, I take that to mean one standard setting for all take-offs, I read FedX always used flap 25, and some carriers used other settings. I could not find anything specific on weight vs. flaps. I have used varoius settings above 22.0 and found that as long as the trim is there just go for it! :( :( :( and hope it flies... I just saw one guy say "it's like dail a pizza, it promises to deliver in 30 minutes or less" Seriously, to get an exact setting you would nn the additional limiting data which airport performance charts would give eg.slope, obsticles as it would relate to wx conditions/airport elev. In short I found this to be much like computing V speeds and as I eluded to above some carriers just did not use the system as it was intended. That is as much as I will say. I will ask my neighbor again and see why his airline did not choose to use it. It has been along time since he flew the MD-11 and he now flies the long haul 777 flights. Vincent

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I always use 22. The thing that varies is the stab trim. And there is no need to calculate that, because the MCDU will show you the right setting on the TO/APPR page.

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I always use 22. The thing that varies is the stab trim. And there is no need to calculate that, because the MCDU will show you the right setting on the TO/APPR page.
I would have to agree.... size 22 fits all. Just be sure to set the trim, else you'll likely still be on the ground when the grass arrives.

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I always use 22. The thing that varies is the stab trim. And there is no need to calculate that, because the MCDU will show you the right setting on the TO/APPR page.
That would figure as the trim would be dependent on the CG which is dependent on the way the acrft is loaded which is dependent on etc. I agree w/ you that 22 is a good setting and I use it or 23 most of the time. As a former instructor in W/B it cannot be said enough here for those who may not have had any formal training in this, W/B is more complicated than just reading what the FMC or W/B sheet is giving you. Many other factors play into this subject w/ different types of acrft, engines and water injection systems. For those who have worked smaller acrft like the BAE41,31 or Metros, and many others you already know this. Living in a region which has high altitude airports like Butte, Spokane, Walla Walla etc. and higher temps with shorter runways in some cases things can get somewhat complicated when figuring your allowable load. Complicate this with alternates and required fuel loads, sometimes many pax are denied boarding and then you get to explain this stuff to someone who only knows that 6 seats are empty and the plane is leaving w/out me! :( :( I found ops to be my favorite work station because of the challenge it provided day after day. I could pass along some funny stories but this is not the place. I hope for those of you new to this hobby and the technical aspects of operating acrft and airlines you will take the time to learn more about this most important but little known aspect of the airline business. Vincent

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