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Guest blfnmry

Standard Rate Turns

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Lately I have been practicing instrument flying with FSX. For the most part I fly the smaller GA aircraft since that is what I am most familiar with. Recently I tried flying some of the big jets which has led to some difficulty. It seems none of them are equipped with a turn coordinator so I am finding it impossible to perform accurate holds and procedure turns which require you to make precise standard rate turns.Perhaps someone on this forum can enlighten me on this subject. Do jet pilots do things differently in the real world where they don'te require the use of a turn coordinator or am I just missing something here?

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Lately I have been practicing instrument flying with FSX. For the most part I fly the smaller GA aircraft since that is what I am most familiar with. Recently I tried flying some of the big jets which has led to some difficulty. It seems none of them are equipped with a turn coordinator so I am finding it impossible to perform accurate holds and procedure turns which require you to make precise standard rate turns.Perhaps someone on this forum can enlighten me on this subject. Do jet pilots do things differently in the real world where they don'te require the use of a turn coordinator or am I just missing something here?
As far as I know, all have a TnB, in jets it's usually a small triangle at the top of the PFD. A standard rate turn is a standard rate turn no matter what you are flying, 3 degrees per second.

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I thought the triangle was only the angle of bank.... and if you line up the little rectangle thing below it it indicates you are coordinated in a turn. I don't know how to tell if it's actually standard rate though...g1000TC.jpgAnyway, I thought 20 degrees is close to standard rate but not always.

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Do jet pilots do things differently in the real world where they don't require the use of a turn coordinator or am I just missing something here?
Yes, they do.First they usually don't have to bother with turn coordination - yaw damper does it for them automatically. My God, today you can even buy a 4-seat Cirrus SR-22 with optional yaw damper. BUT, every aircraft is equipped with a turn coordinator, it is simply presented differently in bigger aircraft specially in glass cockpit.Also, jet pilots flying much faster do not normally do standard rate turns - their 'standard' turns are done at half of the standard rate. Standard rate turn in a fast jet would require too much bank which could make passengers uncomfortable.Neither holds nor procedure turns demand standard rate.
Anyway, I thought 20 degrees is close to standard rate but not always
Only at speed of 152 mph.

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This might help:A standard rate turn is defined to be three degrees per second. This is what ATC expects when you

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First they usually don't have to bother with turn coordination - yaw damper does it for them automatically. My God, today you can even buy a 4-seat Cirrus SR-22 with optional yaw damper. BUT, every aircraft is equipped with a turn coordinator, it is simply presented differently in bigger aircraft specially in glass cockpit.
A yaw damper has nothing to do with turn coordination.

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A yaw damper has nothing to do with turn coordination.
A quick google has me convinced that the yaw damper has a lot to do with turn coordination, at least on some aircraft.With regards to standard rate turns, these become unfeasible above a certain airspeed, as the required bank angle becomes too steep (for passenger comfort and possibly wing loading).

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A yaw damper has nothing to do with turn coordination.
Tell it for example many operators of Cirrus aircraft that happen to have the yaw damper installed.Tell it Boeing captains too ...I suggest at least you make some effort to learn a bit about the subject before you write anything ...

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A good rule of thumb for standard rate is 10% of airspeed + 5 degrees. 90kt = 9+5 = 14 degree bank. I'm assuming it applies to all aircraft but I could understand if it gets off at a higher GS. I did my instrument check ride this morning and got my rating so I hope I'm correct!

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I did my instrument check ride this morning and got my rating
Congratulations! :(

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Thanks! Living in Houston, it went surprisingly well considering the non-jet stream low pressure area that traveled at a snail's pace across the Gulf of Mexico.

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I did my instrument check ride this morning and got my rating so I hope I'm correct!
Congrats Russell !!!

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Tell it for example many operators of Cirrus aircraft that happen to have the yaw damper installed.Tell it Boeing captains too ...I suggest at least you make some effort to learn a bit about the subject before you write anything ...
I have learnt about the subject - I've gone through the ATPL sylabus and nowhere did it mention this. :(

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