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Guest BeaverDriver

Guide Is Out

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Guest sg38

Thanx Glenn for that superb guide! As the Super Cub is the only taildragger I fly IRL (besides the 767-300 which can drag its tail VERY easy) but definitely in non-bush-flying style or environment, it's a very informative and well written guide. Hope that this guide gets well known fast!BTW, Rays story is also great! Bernt

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Guest BeaverDriver
Thanx Glenn for that superb guide! As the Super Cub is the only taildragger I fly IRL (besides the 767-300 which can drag its tail VERY easy) but definitely in non-bush-flying style or environment, it's a very informative and well written guide. Hope that this guide gets well known fast!BTW, Rays story is also great! Bernt
Thanks Bernt. By the by, I just saw a modified 767 recently. I'm wondering if this is the one you fly?B767Tail.jpg :(

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HiI would like to ask a (dumb) question.Does the "square" rule apply on descent also? If I'm cruising at 2.300 rpm / 23" map and I want to descent at 500 ft/min, I reduce the throttle at 18" map. Do I have to reduce RPM at 1.800 also?Thanks in advance.Rosario Manzo, IT


Ciao!

Rosario Manzo, IT

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Guest BeaverDriver
HiI would like to ask a (dumb) question.Does the "square" rule apply on descent also? If I'm cruising at 2.300 rpm / 23" map and I want to descent at 500 ft/min, I reduce the throttle at 18" map. Do I have to reduce RPM at 1.800 also?Thanks in advance.Rosario Manzo, IT
Not a dumb question by any means. The short answer is no. Just bring the throttle back about 5" Manifold pressure to descend from cruise altitude. Leave the prop control where it is and that will keep the RPM's at 2300 (in your example), which is fine.The Details:The main thing you want to keep in mind with a non-turbo or supercharged engine is to not let the manifold pressure exceed the rpm's (although this does happen on takeoff, but you are only holding takeoff power for a short time - note the max amount of time for takeoff power on the 185 is 5 minutes). When you are reducing power then, you are coming back on the throttle only. With a constant speed prop as this airplane has (unlike the 172 where you are affecting RPM's directly with the throttle action) as you bring the throttle back, only the manifold pressure (MAP) will change. In this case it will become less, so you are obeying the rule of keeping the MAP at or below the RPM's. Once you get to 15", the prop is in a full fine position and so as you reduce below 15", the RPM's will start to come down as well.So, to descend from cruise, bring the throttle back out until you see about 5" less MAP than what you were cruising at (i.e. if you were 23 squared, that would then give you 18") to get about a 500 foot per minute descent rate, which is easy on the ears. Don't come back below 15" MAP until you are slowing down in the pattern for landing or you'll shock cool the engine. You'll notice your prop will still be turning at 2300 RPM (or whatever you had in cruise) because you haven't adjusted the prop control (which is correct). Once you do bring the throttle back so the MAP is less than 15", your RPM's will start to come down since at 15" the prop has gone to the full fine position (this happens automatically as the governor tries to keep that constant RPM), so then the throttle starts to directly affect RPM's. This is normal. Now one thing you do NOT want to do is push the throttle up from 23" to say 25" before you advance the prop to 25". That could have engine parts coming apart at the most inopportune times :( .Now, one last important thing - on short final (about 1/4 mile or less), push the prop control full forward (full fine) so that if you have to do a go-around last minute, you'll have full RPM's available, and you won't overstress the engine by suddenly having 30" MAP (full throttle) and the prop still wound back to 2300 RPM.Hope that is clear. By all means drop a line if it is still confusing.

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Crystal clear, thank you very much (but this means I still need a lot of practice!).Ciao e grazie! :(


Ciao!

Rosario Manzo, IT

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Guest
Long story!
Ah, even more golden nuggets of information! (I already wondered why RPM didn't change when moving the throttle...!)You might find it nice to know that you (and the C185F, but well, mainly you!) completely changed my hobby...! I've been flying GA's for quite some time now, mainly above bush (don't care too much for the big cities) but before that I liked big airliners. Coming from those airliners, I flew my GA sort of like an airliner... I would take off, turn on the NAV and ALT on the AP (that's why I edited the default AP into the C185F!), set throttle as high as was allowed and flew straight from A to B, making sure I was high enough all the way not to bump into mountains, and in the meantime I would enjoy the scereny. And sometimes, believe it or not, I wondered why flying did become boring after a while... :( After reading your guide and knowing how to handle this plane like a real (bush) pilot would, I totally changed my way of flying! Now I stay closer to earth, I meander through valleys, jump over mountains (or fly around them if possible), fly slower (23 squared instead of 25 all the way :( ) and... I am having a ball! Also knowing why I am doing what I am doing in the cockpit (like what you just said about the prop) makes it so much more entertaining and worthwhile! Awesome! This afternoon I even did a LONGER flight (at a slower speed) than I usually do and it didn't bore me for a single second because I was busy actually flying all the time!So thank you, BeaverDriver, for refreshing my hobby! Or should I say: thank you for giving me a new hobby? :( I think I am going to remove the default AP I installed: I don't use it anymore...! B) The old one looks nicer in the VC, so... And I might also reinstall the old second radio and VOR, because I stopped using the ENB-bloom for now (flying slow and low above all those trees made it clear using that addon costs precious fps). Within a few weeks I hopefully will be flying Orbx's PNW which seems like a bush flyer's dream come true, so... I am having a great time with FSX! B)

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Guest BeaverDriver
Crystal clear, thank you very much (but this means I still need a lot of practice!).Ciao e grazie! :(
Good stuff. Enjoy and have fun :(

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Guest dusty_sourdough_574

Right on Jeroen!

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Guest BeaverDriver
Ah, even more golden nuggets of information! (I already wondered why RPM didn't change when moving the throttle...!)You might find it nice to know that you (and the C185F, but well, mainly you!) completely changed my hobby...! I've been flying GA's for quite some time now, mainly above bush (don't care too much for the big cities) but before that I liked big airliners. Coming from those airliners, I flew my GA sort of like an airliner... I would take off, turn on the NAV and ALT on the AP (that's why I edited the default AP into the C185F!), set throttle as high as was allowed and flew straight from A to B, making sure I was high enough all the way not to bump into mountains, and in the meantime I would enjoy the scereny. And sometimes, believe it or not, I wondered why flying did become boring after a while... :( After reading your guide and knowing how to handle this plane like a real (bush) pilot would, I totally changed my way of flying! Now I stay closer to earth, I meander through valleys, jump over mountains (or fly around them if possible), fly slower (23 squared instead of 25 all the way :( ) and... I am having a ball! Also knowing why I am doing what I am doing in the cockpit (like what you just said about the prop) makes it so much more entertaining and worthwhile! Awesome! This afternoon I even did a LONGER flight (at a slower speed) than I usually do and it didn't bore me for a single second because I was busy actually flying all the time!So thank you, BeaverDriver, for refreshing my hobby! Or should I say: thank you for giving me a new hobby? I think I am going to remove the default AP I installed: I don't use it anymore...! :( The old one looks nicer in the VC, so... And I might also reinstall the old second radio and VOR, because I stopped using the ENB-bloom for now (flying slow and low above all those trees made it clear using that addon costs precious fps). Within a few weeks I hopefully will be flying Orbx's PNW which seems like a bush flyer's dream come true, so... I am having a great time with FSX! B)
That's great J. Thank you for this. Makes it all worthwhile to know people are getting use out of it, and especially to this degree. Real flying is tougher than the simulated kind in most respects, but the closer you can get to flying the sim as you would a real aircraft, the better and more fun it gets. I too used to "get up high and go fast" trotting around in 727's and whatnot in the sim, but now it's bush all the way for me. You're right about the frames down low though. The autogen really hampers it, yet it's down low where you really use it. It's a trade off as always.Enjoy your simming and thanks again B)

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Because I liked the way Carenado made the pilots manual AND because I like BeaverDriver's checklist (for wheels) AND because I don't like to turn pages while flying :( I turned BeaverDriver's checklist into something that looks 'authentic' to me. (Probably isn't, but it looks nice and now I can have it ALL at once in front of me while flying :( ).(Click on the image for a 100% jpg at 300 dpi if you want to print it: I have it printed in color on 250 grams paper! :( )dm6zp4.jpg

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Guest dusty_sourdough_574

Thank you very much for sharing this.It looks really good Jeroen!Does save some page turning fer sure.

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Guest BeaverDriver

Outstanding J! Nice work!

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Glenn, The Guide was really helpful. Thank you for your time.But, the part that really caught me was when you said that UTX now makes it possible for lakes to freeze over.You see besides FS'ing I also sail an ICEBOAT, a DN/60. I have had it for a number of years. Some of my greatest thrills were to watch a small aircraft circle around watching our sails. He the might come down close to the ice just to try to judge our speed across the ICE. I bet it was a surprise to the pilot when he had to increase the throttle to keep up. Sometimes our speeds easily hit 50 - 65 MPH across the ice. Every now and then an aircraft would land just to talk with us and share stories.So, I warmed up my C185 and took off to the north for some ICE landings. I went up to lake Winnipisaukie in NH which has around 12" of ice this time of year. I got ready for my approach, leaving plenty of room for stopping. The Winter waters in FSX look different...I got lower and slower, now with full flaps deployed I am dropping pretty quick. "Hmm, it doesn't really look like ice"...... SPLASH.OK, So where's THE ICE or how do I turn it on Thank you this great guideTom

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Guest BeaverDriver
Glenn, The Guide was really helpful. Thank you for your time.But, the part that really caught me was when you said that UTX now makes it possible for lakes to freeze over.You see besides FS'ing I also sail an ICEBOAT, a DN/60. I have had it for a number of years. Some of my greatest thrills were to watch a small aircraft circle around watching our sails. He the might come down close to the ice just to try to judge our speed across the ICE. I bet it was a surprise to the pilot when he had to increase the throttle to keep up. Sometimes our speeds easily hit 50 - 65 MPH across the ice. Every now and then an aircraft would land just to talk with us and share stories.So, I warmed up my C185 and took off to the north for some ICE landings. I went up to lake Winnipisaukie in NH which has around 12" of ice this time of year. I got ready for my approach, leaving plenty of room for stopping. The Winter waters in FSX look different...I got lower and slower, now with full flaps deployed I am dropping pretty quick. "Hmm, it doesn't really look like ice"...... SPLASH.OK, So where's THE ICE or how do I turn it on Thank you this great guideTom
:( Well, it has been a mild winter this year, you know :( . OK, open up the Setup Tool for UTX, go into the Ultimate Terrain menu. Click on "Change Assigned Water Textures", and click on Hard Winter (as long as you have FSX set to real time, you should be seeing ice anyway without doing this, but I don't know how far 'south' they go to swap water with ice). So, if that doesn't completely do it for you, you can change the textures manually (overriding what you have). Just select the water body (I do all perennial lakes, large through small, then rivers same thing, etc. but I'm flying much north of you so we realistically get everything frozen up this time of year, save for the ocean). For each water body, see what's there, then use the Quick Select and scroll down to Ice and click on that. Then make sure you hit the Save or Apply (can't remember which it says now) button on the lower right, and finally exit. Now when you go back into FSX, you should see ice everywhere, although you'll lose it (maybe) at lower latitudes. That said, you may not since you are overriding the textures manually. OH, before you fly again, put the 185 through the Dry cycle of a car wash or something :( . Hope that helps!Glad the guide is helping - thanks for that!

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