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Guest sfgiants13

Landing

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My landings are getting pretty weird. I always approach like an ILS because my nose looks like im climbing, but im descending. It's like a 20 degree to stay even. What can I do to where I can get my aircraft even and not go down 100 feet per second? I know there's probably something I haven't figured out yet how to do in an aircraft.

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Try adding flaps or come in faster during approach. In an airliner, I usually hit the ILS at 150-175kts, and land at about 120-130kts, depending on the plane. I usually add more flaps when the nose goes above 5 degrees.

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>do to where I can get my aircraft even and not go down 100>feet per second? 100 feet per second = 6000 ft/min = destroyed airplane and dead passengers on landing. :-zhelpMichael J.

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When I add flaps, it just makes my nose go even higher so it looks like I'm almost a space shuttle when I'm at 30 flaps.

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weird flaps should force the autopilot to lower the nose to avoid climbing due to the increased lift. Id say 10 degrees of nose up is ok if you want you can add speed, that helps lower the nose also. If you add too much speed with the flaps down youll start to get a nose down attitude. Id prefer to have 2-10 degrees nose up than 10 degrees nose down thats for sure........ :-)Andrew

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Here's how it goes. At 10 degrees, I'm even, then as I go down the scale to 20,30,etc, my nose goes up and my speed drops. I know you're speed will drop though.

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Yes, and I'm flying a B757-200. I think it does have autoland, but I never want to use it.

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okay... if your approaching the runway on autopilot (APP engaged) and you dont want to perform an autoland, disengage the autopilot totally at 400 feet and fly manually from there.AndrewPS. what panel are you using?

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The only time I use autopilot is when I'm cruising. I use a downloaded 757 panel.

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Depends on the aircraft, and also your approach speed, and even your view settings.If you approach too slow, you'll have to maintain a higher and higher angle of attack to stay on the glideslope. You may want to pick an approach speed ten-twenty pct. faster, slowing down just before flare and touchdown. Also, it's possible that your default flight may have been saved with an unrealistic forward view--especially if you had played with shift/enter or shift/backspace before saving it. Look out to the side during your next approach. Does it still look like you're climbing at a 20 deg. angle? If not, your forward view may be messed up. In which case, I'd take one of the default flights and load it up, make your adjustments as far as aircraft and startup preferences, then save it as a new default flight.-JohnP.S. You mentioned a 3rd party panel in another response. If my above suggestions don't help, back up the panel.cfg, and remove all entries related to the view in it. Those may also change the landing perspective.

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ok...so your landing manually right? when you approach your supposed to be descending at 500-900 fpm with the nose pitched up a bit. When your about to land the nose needs to stay up so you dont touch down nose first or all at the same time. You can leave the flaps fully down and increase speed a bit to try to reduce the pitch.Andrew

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hi,you can press W once and thatll let you see the runway more easilly with the nose still pitched up.Andrew

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Now, whenever I land, my back wheels end up going through the scenery and I look like a taildragger because my back wheels are through the ground. Is that a sign of a hard landing, or scenery?

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Thrust, drag, lift and weight. It is a system.As you slow down, you loose lift, you increase the angle of attack to maintain lift, and that increases drag, add power to maintain altitude.Sounds like you are using pitch to maintain altitude or desired descent rate.If you know approach power for the aircraft you are flying, set the power from straight and level flight. Set your pitch using elevator trim. Once you have the nose at the angle you want for approach (say 3 degrees pitch up, or 5) then use power to maintain the altitude or descent rate you need to follow the glideslope. If you go high, or above the glideslope, reduce power, if you are descending too fast, or you are too low, add power. Don't just pull the nose back. This is a good way to stall and fall. As you pull back on the yoke, the angle of attack increases, and so does drag. Set the pitch trim, adjust the power to get the glideslope. If the speed falls of, don't add power, reduce the pitch. If the altitude falls off, adjust the power. This is not intuitive to new pilots, and appears to be opposite to what they expect."Control the Speed with pitch and the altitude with Power".If you are hand flying, (no autopilot or approach mode) pick a visual aiming point on the Runway and keep it is a constant position on the windshield. If the point (the runway numbers for instance) are moving down you are going high, reduce power. If they are moving up the windshield, you are below glideslope and need to add power. Imagine a string from your plane to the aiming point on the runway, and you are trying fly down it, to the point.As you increase flaps, you will need to adjust the trim again. As the flaps approach full in a heavy aircraft (airliner) you may need to add power to precent having to increase pitch to maintain glideslope (sound familiar). As the gear comes down, drag is increased, this will slow the aircraft, and is a normal part of the approach, to let it slow the aircraft, but not to stalling speed. You may have to add a touch of power to maintain glideslope, and then, you guessed it, adjust the pitch trim again. As you "walk the power off" on short final, you begin to pitch up a little to maintain approach trajectory. (do not take the power to idle on an airliner on short final) In the last few seconds of flight power should be lower than approach, and the pitch is increasing to hold the wheels off the runway. This is called the flare. The flare reduces the rate of descent by adding lift and drag. Too abrupt of a flare can approach critical angle of attack, and you will be on the backside of the power curve. (you will have to add a lot of power to stay in the air. The wing is stalling and the plane begins to drop. Smooth flare begins at different heights based on speed, and rate of descent for different aircraft. It is a 'feeling' you get and is the part of flying that is like trying to teach someone to lean a motorcycle. It takes practice. Remember, set the pitch (trim), adjust the power. As you get above or below your speed, you will have to adjust the pitch for speed. If you are way off on speed, you may have to adjust power and retrim. Good Luck and keep practicing.Dennis Mitchell

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Well, I did a short hop and landed in Vegas. The landing was fine, except with a small bounce. But when I landed, my aircraft just shot right, and kept turning. Now I'm trying to fix that problem. I put left all the way on the joystick just to keep it even.

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I fixed the right problem. It was one of those temperary faults because my computer has been on a while. I saved my approach from Vegas, and I did a pretty good landing, just with a small bounce. Before, whenever I saved a flight and tried relanding, I went right through the scenery into the ground, so I thought it was a bug, but I guess it was me.

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To get rid of the bounce, pull the power back to to idle just before touching down and flare up a little more just as you do this to decrease the decent rate. Not too much or you will balloon up. Imagine that the flare is an air cushion. Use it to soften the impact.I knew you'd get it figured out. Dennis

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I still get that little hop step. In the pics, you can see my flare and the hop. I'm in a B757-200 and going at about 140 knots. If I go any slower, half of the time I stall when going under 135 knots. Right now I've just done about 15 short finals practicing my landing at KLAS.

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Ok, your flare looks good, I can't see your descent rate in a still shot so let's assume that it is a little too fast. Keep a little thottle in until you meet the runway. Once you go to idle in a plane this size, the descent rate increases. The small amount of thrust will provide a little lift and cause you to float a little longer. Once you have the flare, or pitch up you want, you can either leave the throttle on a little longer, but I think most will agree that the flare is not a static pitch. Just before RW contact, the flare becomes a slight constant rotation. This is just a constant back pressure on the yoke, you don't want a great increase in pitch, just a slight rotation. Think of it as if you were trying to keep the main gear off the runway as long as possible. This is more pronounced in a small plane. In a 757, you only rotate a little at the end (after your initial flare). In these last few seconds of flight, the back preassure is really just a way of decreasing your descent rate. If you are bouncing, you are still coming down too fast. At the time you make contact, you want to be flying down the runway, with a shallow descent angle. Transition your eyes from the near field to the the oppositie end of the runway until the view is obscured by the glare shield, and then use what you can see about 45 degrees off the the panel, to your left to judge your contact. Your flare angle is sweet. I think you almost there for a 'greaser'.Dennis Mitchell

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I guess I'll just have to practice. Thanks for your help guys.

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