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blackheart2502

Wicked 737-800 Tailstrike

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Nasty, question though, what's that claw looking dealy hanging out?

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Ooops. That's a big prang. Beyond the skin damage - which may affect pressure integrity - the load forces will almost certainly have been transmitted through some frames and stringers up to the top rear end of the aircraft near the base of the dorsal fillet. In any case, even if the frames and stringers miraculously escaped damage, it's not going to be cheap to fix.In fairness, that can be a tricky airport to land at, but even so the crew will have to do some fast talking to get out of that one without it being a career-stopper. Even if it wasn't their fault, they might still get fired simply for PR reasons. Still, it does show that airliners are a lot tougher than they look.Al

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question though, what's that claw looking dealy hanging out?
That's the Main Outflow Valve door, it is to adjust cabin pressure. That is one of the ways you can tell which 737 you are looking at actually, since only NGs from about 2004 onwards have that door with the 'claws' on, which are there to reduce the noise the earlier ones without such serrated edges would generate - the serrations break up the airflow a bit to reduce the noise it generates. Prior to the NG, 737s had a Main Outflow Valve door which opened inwards.Al

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That's the Main Outflow Valve door, it is to adjust cabin pressure. That is one of the ways you can tell which 737 you are looking at actually, since only NGs from about 2004 onwards have that door with the 'claws' on, which are there to reduce the noise the earlier ones without such serrated edges would generate - the serrations break up the airflow a bit to reduce the noise it generates.Al
Cool, thanks for the answer Al!

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In a transport jet aircraft, there is no need to "grease it in," assuming that's what this guy was trying to do. If I'm not mistaken, come in at VREF+5 (or whatever), with the proper nose angle and on glide path. Once you are ready to flare, give it another 2 to 3 degrees of nose up and let it plant.Or, maybe they were under speed and too nose-up to begin with?

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