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lmlopes

CPU Cooler for o/c

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Hello,
wich would be a good cooler or watercooler to o/c my system:

 

ASUS PEX58D PREMIUM
Intel core i7 980X 3.33GHz 12MB 1366 Six-Core
ZOTAC GTX 480 1536MB GDDR5 C/HDMI PCI-EXP
ATX Cooler Master HAF 922 BLACK + SevenTeam 1000W ST-1000EAZ
HD Seagate 1TB 7200RPM 32MB SATA II (FOR WINDOWS 7)
HD WD VelociRaptor 600 GB, SATA 3 Gb/s, Cache 32 MB, 10.000 RPM (FOR FSX)
XMS3 Corsair 6GB (3x2GB) DDR 3 1600 CAS 7-8-7-20 1.65V
LG W2353V MONITOR WIDESCREEN 23"
WINDOWS 7 PROFESSIONAL 64bit



Many Thanks,
Lucas.
 

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Laing D5, Black Ice Extreme R360, Koolance CPU 380i, build with 1/2 in. ID Tygon and compression fittings.

 

HLJAMES

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Temps here, overclocked and under load...

http://www.guru3d.co..._review,13.html

H100i 76 degrees
Kraken X60 70 degrees [Noisy higher RPM fans]
Corsair H110 72 degrees [Very quiet]
NH-D14 72 degrees [Very quiet]

Noise levels here...

 

http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/corsair_h110_review,11.html

NH-D14 and H110 are the best in terms of heat sink/radiator efficiency. If they fit in your case.

Some pertain to be better, and do indeed cool a couple of degrees better, but they do so as a result of higher RPM noisy fans, so be warned.

Thermalright Silver Arrow is another choice, both in standard form and the "extreme" with high RPM fans. But be warned, some reviews of the Silver Arrow are a bit negative. Bad RAM clearance and bad fitting.

Full blown custom water cooling rig is obviously the ultimate.

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Whenever I see a thread about cooling, I like to bring up the importance of ambient temperature. For the big majority of people The ambient environment for their hardware is under their desk. However, if you live in a cold climate and can keep your system outdoors and run your cables to where you play then you will have great cooling with your stock block and fan! Well maybe you should still get an after market cooler but ambient temp will have a huge impact on your temps.

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Whenever I see a thread about cooling, I like to bring up the importance of ambient temperature. For the big majority of people The ambient environment for their hardware is under their desk. However, if you live in a cold climate and can keep your system outdoors and run your cables to where you play then you will have great cooling with your stock block and fan! Well maybe you should still get an after market cooler but ambient temp will have a huge impact on your temps.

Very true, ambient temp has a big impact.

 

For most people though locating your PC outdoors is inconvenient, and not at all necessary.

 

Today in the UK it's very warm. 27C, so over 80F, in the bedroom where my PC is located. Despite that I have no issues whatsoever with an overclocked 3770K @ 4.5 GHz. At the temps I'm currently at, even higher ambient wouldn't be an issue. Temps are great.

 

High end coolers and decent enclosures with sizable fans are very efficient in regard to cooling.

 

If you happen to be desperate to squeeze as much out of you overclock as possible, and you happen to be so thrifty that you like the idea of buying a cheap cooler, such measures as locating your PC outside might be worth the inconvenience, but certainly not for the vast majority. Most are quite happy with a 4.5 - 5 GHz overclock, and spending some money on a quality cooler.

 

Super long joystick cable, super long mouse cable, super long keyboard cable, super long sound system cables, super long monitor cable, and having to go outside to insert DVD's, and turn on and off your PC, isn't worth it for a few hundred megahertz more in my opinion.

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Whenever I see a thread about cooling, I like to bring up the importance of ambient temperature. For the big majority of people The ambient environment for their hardware is under their desk. However, if you live in a cold climate and can keep your system outdoors and run your cables to where you play then you will have great cooling with your stock block and fan! Well maybe you should still get an after market cooler but ambient temp will have a huge impact on your temps.

It's an absolutely valid point!  I did this a little differently than putting parts outside--I installed a small thru-the-wall A/C unit 6 years ago and ran my Q9650 using a retail HSF w/ the case cover off so 40 degree air blew at a low flow rate over all interior parts.   Not exactly quiet but since I use headphones that piece didn't matter.  I have a new system now and use the Noctua D-14 and as Martin suggests really no longer need the A/C.  However, since we have hot summers this was half the reason for installing A/C, so I use it on occasion now when it's quite hot just to cool the room.  When the A/C runs now I get crazy low temps o'clocked at 4.3 or 4.4Ghz  Haven't pushed the CPU up to the max yet, but running FSX now w/ the D-14 on the notoriously heat-generatiing Hexacore SB-E processor I'm seeing temps around 52C now overclocked w/ A/C on, and around 62C w/ A/C off, so that's a big difference.  I don't have the case cover off either as the various fans on the HaF X case are perfectly positioned to take advantage of the A/C air flow.

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Idea!!! put your PC inside the freezer drill holes in the door for the cables then when you switch your PC on you can also grab and ice cold beer.. :P

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Once you solve the problem of CPU cooling it always leads to 1.5 Volt core voltage limit. Nehalem, Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell.

 

HLJAMES

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Once you solve the problem of CPU cooling it always leads to 1.5 Volt core voltage limit. Nehalem, Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell.

 

HLJAMES

No way I'd do 1.5v on i7-3930K I have now.  Just not worth the degradation ;o)

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Idea!!! put your PC inside the freezer drill holes in the door for the cables then when you switch your PC on you can also grab and ice cold beer.. :P

Very funny but it wouldn't work. The freezer could not handled having a heater inside it!

Now Natures freezer! That's a different ball game. B)

 

I had my i7 920 @ 4.8 ghz with the voltage over 1.7v for a while :lol: and its still alive.

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Very funny but it wouldn't work. The freezer could not handled having a heater inside it!

Now Natures freezer! That's a different ball game. B)

 

I had my i7 920 @ 4.8 ghz with the voltage over 1.7v for a while :lol: and its still alive.

2009 Gulftown used for FSX @ 1.55V still in everyday use!

 

HLJAMES

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What about putting your computer in an insulated box, and then piping in/out outside air through insulated ducts?  Would that maybe work?

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What about putting your computer in an insulated box, and then piping in/out outside air through insulated ducts? Would that maybe work?

Probably would. But at the end of the day so would many other approaches. It's about how much trouble you are prepared to go to, how much it would cost, and if it's actually necessary.

 

Even in quite warm environments, standard cooling arrangements usually work quite adequately, even with reasonable overclocks.

 

If you really want to go to town, but while still retaining a semblance of normality, a full custom water cooling loop and a Hailea HC-500A water chiller would be the way to go.

 

And yes, you could pipe the chiller through into another room. I believe they can be quite noisy.

 

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cooling/2010/07/20/hailea-hc-500a-water-chiller-review/1

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What about putting your computer in an insulated box, and then piping in/out outside air through insulated ducts?  Would that maybe work?

Yes! Your CPU will reward you for ANY cooling you provide.

CPU cooling is not a new problem, there is a cooling industry, The problem is fear of watercooling.

 

HLJAMES

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Yes! Your CPU will reward you for ANY cooling you provide.

CPU cooling is not a new problem, there is a cooling industry, The problem is fear of watercooling.

 

HLJAMES

My above post was just a suggestion (which I personally don't need).

 

I'm planning on to ordering a new computer in a few weeks, and I admit that I have some fear of using a liquid cooler.  My new computer will have a slightly overclocked i7-4770K, so I need a CPU cooler. I briefly considered a Corsair H100i, but now I'm leaning towards using a Noctua NH-D14 SE2011.  What I didn't like about the Corsair (besides the fact that it was a liquid cooler) was that It would have replaced my case's 200mm top exhaust fan.  With the Noctura, I don't lose any of my case's default fans, and I don't have to worry about it leaking.

 

I live far enough north that my house is rarely hot, and my computer is on my lower level, where the temperature averages about 70 degrees (above 75 degrees is rare).  So I think that I'll be fine.  The only thing I don't like about the Noctua is that it is so huge!

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If you really want to go to town, but while still retaining a semblance of normality, a full custom water cooling loop and a Hailea HC-500A water chiller would be the way to go.

 

Now that looks like a very nice cooling arrangement. Not a horrible price for what you are getting. But then my wife would say, "What's that noise? I haven't heard that one before!" And then I would have to explain. And then I would have to tell her how much it cost. And then she would beat the crap out of me. :lol: :( :ph34r:

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If you really want to go to town, but while still retaining a semblance of normality, a full custom water cooling loop and a Hailea HC-500A water chiller would be the way to go.

 

And yes, you could pipe the chiller through into another room. I believe they can be quite noisy.

 

I still think thru-the-wall A/C is a good option because your entire box gets cooled not just the CPU or even CPU & GPU.  Mobo, CPU, GPU, DIMMS, etc get the benefit, however it's true for moderate o/c no real need.  Even so, I like the fact w/ this approach there is no need for a revision when a new build is installed as it's separate from the PC.  The noise--well, headphones or turning up the volume on ext speakers works well.  Plus bonus:  no water leak risk!

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What I didn't like about the Corsair (besides the fact that it was a liquid cooler) was that It would have replaced my case's 200mm top exhaust fan.

 

Could you not place that fan somewhere else and thus not losing it ?

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Could you not place that fan somewhere else and thus not losing it ?

 

The case I want is the Corsair Graphite CC600TW (a mid-tower case).  It has two 200mm fans (1 front and 1 top) and one 120mm fan (back). The only optional fans are if you use the included mesh side panel (instead of the window), where you can add up to four 120mm fans (but not a 200mm fan).

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I still think thru-the-wall A/C is a good option because your entire box gets cooled not just the CPU or even CPU & GPU. Mobo, CPU, GPU, DIMMS, etc get the benefit, however it's true for moderate o/c no real need. Even so, I like the fact w/ this approach there is no need for a revision when a new build is installed as it's separate from the PC. The noise--well, headphones or turning up the volume on ext speakers works well. Plus bonus: no water leak risk!

In terms of CPU cooling I'm not going to argue with that Noel, as you have actually used that method in the past, and found it very effective. However, for you noise may not be an issue, but for most it is. For most, it's about a balance between effective cooling and acceptable noise levels. We all have a noise level that's the max we will accept.

 

I'd also say that Mobo, DIMMS, VRM's, don't require as much cooling as GPU and CPU, so whether that gust of air from an air con unit is actually required is perhaps debatable. Would give you piece of mind though.

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However, for you noise may not be an issue, but for most it is. For most, it's about a balance between effective cooling and acceptable noise levels.

 

In the prior builds I would use one BIOS profile for over clocks into Vista 64 for FSX, and one into XP 32 for digital audio where quiet was very important and so would use AC only for FSX at the highest over clocks, but again I was using a retain HSF.  No need for AC now and the machine is really quiet w/ the D-14 and the HaF X case.  But it gets hot here so it's nice if needed there and I can say w/o hesitation the noise, while I would agree is in no way desirable, is easily ignored as I say by using headphones or if the volume goes up on my speakers.  It's really just white noise as well.  Plus, overclocked SB-E + Titan systems crank out some wattage and some of that radiates to those surrounding parts.  If I was willing to  use high voltage for highest over clocks (which I may do in time after IB-E debuts and reports come out demonstrating a BIOS upgrade will accommodate it on my main board) then it would be quite helpful I'm sure as dropping ambient down that far starts to really matter.  What I really like about this setup now is that I've got the case covers all on so the cooling is very gentle and distributed.

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The case I want is the Corsair Graphite CC600TW (a mid-tower case).  It has two 200mm fans (1 front and 1 top) and one 120mm fan (back). The only optional fans are if you use the included mesh side panel (instead of the window), where you can add up to four 120mm fans (but not a 200mm fan).

 

I'm in the same situation with my HAF X case and H110. If I instead go for a air cooler I got other problems.

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In the prior builds I would use one BIOS profile for over clocks into Vista 64 for FSX, and one into XP 32 for digital audio where quiet was very important and so would use AC only for FSX at the highest over clocks, but again I was using a retain HSF.  No need for AC now and the machine is really quiet w/ the D-14 and the HaF X case.  But it gets hot here so it's nice if needed there and I can say w/o hesitation the noise, while I would agree is in no way desirable, is easily ignored as I say by using headphones or if the volume goes up on my speakers.  It's really just white noise as well.  Plus, overclocked SB-E + Titan systems crank out some wattage and some of that radiates to those surrounding parts.  If I was willing to  use high voltage for highest over clocks (which I may do in time after IB-E debuts and reports come out demonstrating a BIOS upgrade will accommodate it on my main board) then it would be quite helpful I'm sure as dropping ambient down that far starts to really matter.  What I really like about this setup now is that I've got the case covers all on so the cooling is very gentle and distributed.

 

 

As you say, you don't need to at the moment but have you tried blasting your air con into the side panel fan, just to see what can be achieved with the air con/ Haf combo?

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As you say, you don't need to at the moment but have you tried blasting your air con into the side panel fan, just to see what can be achieved with the air con/ Haf combo?

Yes that is how I've set this up.  I used the blue poster board & a piece of cardboard to create a simple deflection of the A/C unit's discharge so that all that yummy cool air flows thru the HaF's powered intake port as well as towards the front intake (240mm fan I think it is), and bonus:  putting the case on its included casters above the layer of pavers keeps dust bunnies out of the PSU air intake and sends cool air into that intake as well.  I can tell you now having tested, this method provide a full 10C cooler than w/o it, which as you've aptly noted, is way cooler than needed for FSX.   I tried the ultimate test w/ this cooling approach:  HT enabled on 6 cores, Prime95 torture test at 4.423Ghz:  never went over 54C in any core.   Of course, FSX does not go there so really it's overkill, but nice for warm days!  And as I've mentioned--this solution takes care of ANY PC, so very little customization is needed for your next build.  The HaF X case is absolutely the perfect choice--thanks again Martin!

 

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Just think how cool it would be with HT off.

 

HT does nothing for FSX.

 

Would be minus another 10 degrees.

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