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Guest Mik75

FSX: Carenado Phenom 300 EDDS to LFMN

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Hi there!

I just finished my 1st succesful flight with the Carenado P300 v1.1.

I have to say, that I had a very enjoyable flight in this bird. A/P worked quite flawlessly, the performance was acceptable and still fluid at and aorund the airports (16-25 fps at Aerosofts EDDS and LFMN) and very fluid (30-40 fps) during the climb, cruise and descend (over FTX Global, Open LC, FS Global 2010, FTX Trees HD, Global Vector).

I loaded a simple flightlpan, done with the MSFS flightplanner, and during the cruise, I chose the approach in the MFD of the G1000, which all worked quite well.

She handflies very nicely, and surely looks absolutely stunning:

 

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Big glass inside that shiny new toy....great angle shots!

 

HLJAMES

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Big glass inside that shiny new toy....great angle shots!

 

HLJAMES

Thanks a lot for your nice comment! I really enjoyed that flight!

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What are your system specs with that performance?

My specs are:

FSX Acceleration in DX9

i5 3570K @ 4.2 GHz

GTX 670 2GB

16 GB CL9 RAM

Win 7 64 bit

all on SSD

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Interesting. I guess the $64 question is what doesn't work or is stubbed out. I'd like this to replace my mustang which is fairly complete

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Interesting. I guess the $64 question is what doesn't work or is stubbed out. I'd like this to replace my mustang which is fairly complete

You mean the Flight1 Mustang, right?

I wouldn't park that one in the hangar! It's still one of my favourite business jets, and its G1000 is really good.

The Phenom 300's G1000, on the other hand, has neat features (system pages, checklists, etc.), but right now, building a flightplan with it isn't working properly for me. But I am looking forward to the release of the Navigraph upgrade, which I'll definetely buy.

Its strongest point right now is its look and feel. The handflying characteristics feel very convincing and believable and the textures and quality of the VC (and the good sounds) result in a highly immersive experience for me.

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You mean the Flight1 Mustang, right?
I wouldn't park that one in the hangar! It's still one of my favourite business jets, and its G1000 is really good.

 

F1 Mustaing, I'm keeping it as long as I keep FSX.  I have P3D too and, increasingly, fly there.  But, yes, I do enjoy the Mustang a lot.  I did a lot of work on the FDE on that one and modded some of the textures. 

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BTW, how's the FADEC?

The detents are not too easy to find, but other than that, the values make sense and the annunciation on the MFD change accordingly.

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The detents are not too easy to find, but other than that, the values make sense and the annunciation on the MFD change accordingly.

 

I was just reading a Flying magazine article here and it had some good tidbits...

 

http://www.flyingmag.com/pilot-reports/jets/embraer-phenom-300

 

The PW535Es are fadec engines, but they don't have detents. Instead, you set the power by lining up the levers with the bright white lines on the quadrant. The fadec synchronizes the engines for you. It's just one more single-pilot convenience, and at a critical phase of flight.

 

With a push of the takeoff/go-around button, we were ready to go. I advanced the throttles and off we went. Directional control was smooth, and I had no trouble keeping the centerline. Our V1 speed of 109 knots came quickly with rotation a blink of an eye after that. Gear up, flaps up. Initial rate of climb was eye-popping, around 4,000 fpm even at our relatively heavy weight. For climb you simply reduce power to the climb setting on the levers — it really is that easy — and watch as the airplane goes up. Going out I hand-flew, following the flight director to guide us on our way.

We were given a climb to 12,000 feet and then to 20,000 right off the bat with no intermediate level-offs. That rarely happens in the States. Soon thereafter, we were given a climb to 40,000 and then our final altitude of 43,000 feet. It took us just 20 minutes to get to FL 400 and another four minutes to reach 43,000. Up through 36,000 feet, we were still climbing at better than 1,500 fpm, and from there we maintained at least 1,200 fpm. For a light jet, the 300 is a strong climber.

 

I leveled the airplane off, reduced power to the long-range cruise setting of Mach .65 and looked at the numbers. At FL 430 we were doing 365 knots true, burning around 112 gph, or around 750 pounds per hour total. In smooth air and all by ourselves, we slipped past the capitol of Brasilia and cruised along toward our first stop, the Amazonian outpost of Manaus, where we needed to stop for customs even though we had the range to continue on to Venezuela. High-speed cruise is a lot faster, better than 450 knots, and with the nearly 2,000 nm range of the 300, that is a speed that many pilots will get to use when they fly shorter legs than we were flying that day.

 

....

 

Our approach speed was 109 knots, and I found it easy to maintain Vref within a knot or two. I had been tutored by José on the landing technique, which is, somewhat surprisingly, very similar to that used in the Phenom 100.
 

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I was just reading a Flying magazine article here and it had some good tidbits...

 

http://www.flyingmag.com/pilot-reports/jets/embraer-phenom-300

 

 

The PW535Es are fadec engines, but they don't have detents. Instead, you set the power by lining up the levers with the bright white lines on the quadrant. The fadec synchronizes the engines for you. It's just one more single-pilot convenience, and at a critical phase of flight.

 

With a push of the takeoff/go-around button, we were ready to go. I advanced the throttles and off we went. Directional control was smooth, and I had no trouble keeping the centerline. Our V1 speed of 109 knots came quickly with rotation a blink of an eye after that. Gear up, flaps up. Initial rate of climb was eye-popping, around 4,000 fpm even at our relatively heavy weight. For climb you simply reduce power to the climb setting on the levers — it really is that easy — and watch as the airplane goes up. Going out I hand-flew, following the flight director to guide us on our way.

We were given a climb to 12,000 feet and then to 20,000 right off the bat with no intermediate level-offs. That rarely happens in the States. Soon thereafter, we were given a climb to 40,000 and then our final altitude of 43,000 feet. It took us just 20 minutes to get to FL 400 and another four minutes to reach 43,000. Up through 36,000 feet, we were still climbing at better than 1,500 fpm, and from there we maintained at least 1,200 fpm. For a light jet, the 300 is a strong climber.

 

I leveled the airplane off, reduced power to the long-range cruise setting of Mach .65 and looked at the numbers. At FL 430 we were doing 365 knots true, burning around 112 gph, or around 750 pounds per hour total. In smooth air and all by ourselves, we slipped past the capitol of Brasilia and cruised along toward our first stop, the Amazonian outpost of Manaus, where we needed to stop for customs even though we had the range to continue on to Venezuela. High-speed cruise is a lot faster, better than 450 knots, and with the nearly 2,000 nm range of the 300, that is a speed that many pilots will get to use when they fly shorter legs than we were flying that day.

 

....

 

Our approach speed was 109 knots, and I found it easy to maintain Vref within a knot or two. I had been tutored by José on the landing technique, which is, somewhat surprisingly, very similar to that used in the Phenom 100.

 

Okay, didn't know that! Thanks for the info.

So, they got that right! ;-)

Super shots! I like G1000. My favorite!

Thank you!

While this isn't my favourite G1000 implementation in FSX (yet), the overall look and feel of the plane is really nice and immersive!

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