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Using FlightPlanner in FSX.

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Hello, Guys!

 

This is my same topic in another forum.

 

 

Look at Flight Planner:

 

Flight_Planner.jpg

 

 

I want to draw a very correct line towards every runway minimum 20nm away from it but you can see in picture that FlightPlanner's Window is too small to draw a big line like 20nm away from Runway. I can only draw 5 or 6nm away line from runway accurately. So, Window is small and I want big line. Can you please give me some idea to draw a big line for landing manually?

Regards,

 

AP,

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Try SimBrief.com. It's a free flight planner that will give you printable maps, weather, and much more. The flight plan can be down loaded to sim as well as file to paste into FSM for several popular add on aircraft. IMO it is payware quality flight planner.

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Try Plan-G.  SimBrief won't do what you want.  It will give you real world flight plans which is good if you want that, and I use it.  With Plan-G, you can zoom into the destination runway, (most of the time it is there) and right click on it and then click on and enable QDM.  It will give you a red line and you just drag it wherever you want.  Then there's a certain place you go too in Plan-G and I forget, but in one of the menus there is something I think called Information and that will give you the heading and distance where the red line is.  

 

So you can drag it about 15 NM out for jets, and about 10NM for the smaller prop planes.  You then just click create waypoint.  It will come up with a box for you to enter a name for the waypoint you created.  There are three places for you to enter them but just enter the same thing in all three.  You then have your final approach waypoint.  If you are approaching downwind to the runway, you can then from that waypoint hover over it, and do the same thing again as I wrote above, and go out about maybe 5 miles base for the Jets and maybe 3-4 miles base for the prop planes.  

 

Then create that waypoint.  Then for downwind, just create a parallel line to the runway (it helps if you have the runway heading like the ILS heading in hand) and just estimate where to start the downwind leg.  Probably just a little past the airport would be good.  Then create the waypoint, and then you have downwind.  Your done!  You just add these waypoints in Plan-G.  The manual will tell you how.  It's easy, trust me.  Your flight plan will automatically include these waypoints for you to follow.  You just follow your own altitudes of course but the horizontal route is done.  

 

For base entries, you do about the same thing, but you stop creating the waypoints on the base leg and the route will automatically take you to base. For straight ins or near straight ins, all you really have to do is just create the final waypoint and the flight plan will take you right in.  I recommend to follow the 3 and 1 rule for descent.  If you have a downwind entry, be about 7 thousand feet on downwind descending to about 4 thousand on base, then 2 thousand for the intercept to the ILS.  

 

The three and one rule is you take your altitude say 30,000 feet or FL300 and multiply by 3.  So, it would be 30 times 3 which =90.  I would always add about 10 miles to it which would be 100 of course and then start your decent.  You can follow the 3 and 1 rule for the whole decent.  Anyway I hope this has helped you to do what you want and I do this too.  I use this when I use SIDS (Standard Instrument Departure) and STARS (Standard Terminal Arrival Route) and since most of these procedures at least in the US require vectors, I can create my own waypoints to follow after the STAR and on vectored SIDS.  It works pretty well.     

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Try Plan-G.  SimBrief won't do what you want.  It will give you real world flight plans which is good if you want that, and I use it.  With Plan-G, you can zoom into the destination runway, (most of the time it is there) and right click on it and then click on and enable QDM.  It will give you a red line and you just drag it wherever you want.  Then there's a certain place you go too in Plan-G and I forget, but in one of the menus there is something I think called Information and that will give you the heading and distance where the red line is.  

 

So you can drag it about 15 NM out for jets, and about 10NM for the smaller prop planes.  You then just click create waypoint.  It will come up with a box for you to enter a name for the waypoint you created.  There are three places for you to enter them but just enter the same thing in all three.  You then have your final approach waypoint.  If you are approaching downwind to the runway, you can then from that waypoint hover over it, and do the same thing again as I wrote above, and go out about maybe 5 miles base for the Jets and maybe 3-4 miles base for the prop planes.  

 

Then create that waypoint.  Then for downwind, just create a parallel line to the runway (it helps if you have the runway heading like the ILS heading in hand) and just estimate where to start the downwind leg.  Probably just a little past the airport would be good.  Then create the waypoint, and then you have downwind.  Your done!  You just add these waypoints in Plan-G.  The manual will tell you how.  It's easy, trust me.  Your flight plan will automatically include these waypoints for you to follow.  You just follow your own altitudes of course but the horizontal route is done.  

 

For base entries, you do about the same thing, but you stop creating the waypoints on the base leg and the route will automatically take you to base. For straight ins or near straight ins, all you really have to do is just create the final waypoint and the flight plan will take you right in.  I recommend to follow the 3 and 1 rule for descent.  If you have a downwind entry, be about 7 thousand feet on downwind descending to about 4 thousand on base, then 2 thousand for the intercept to the ILS.  

 

The three and one rule is you take your altitude say 30,000 feet or FL300 and multiply by 3.  So, it would be 30 times 3 which =90.  I would always add about 10 miles to it which would be 100 of course and then start your decent.  You can follow the 3 and 1 rule for the whole decent.  Anyway I hope this has helped you to do what you want and I do this too.  I use this when I use SIDS (Standard Instrument Departure) and STARS (Standard Terminal Arrival Route) and since most of these procedures at least in the US require vectors, I can create my own waypoints to follow after the STAR and on vectored SIDS.  It works pretty well.     

 

Thank you. Magnificent post.

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