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Michael Moe

weather questions

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Hi folks,

 

what would be the terms to night,  based on this METAR for an ILS 22L and a takeoff 22R ? Please make a comment on your results  :wink:

 

EKCH 061520Z 14010KT 1100 R22L/P1500N R04L/P1500N R12/P1500N -DZ OVC002 11/11 Q1017 NOSIG
 
 
Thanks apreciated alot
 
Michael Moe

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what would be the terms to night,  based on this METAR for an ILS 22L and a takeoff 22R ? Please make a comment on your results  :wink:

 

EKCH 061520Z 14010KT 1100 R22L/P1500N R04L/P1500N R12/P1500N -DZ OVC002 11/11 Q1017 NOSIG

 

 

Michael,

 

What is your question here? By 'terms' do you mean 'chances'? If so, the chances are likely that you'll be on an ILS to 22L, and that the approach will be to the (vertical) minimums for the CAT I. If you're assuming you're CAT II or III equipped, then I'd plan for the CAT II.

 

You'll have almost a 10 knot direct crosswind, and you'll also want to factor in the runway being damp, so your rollout might be slightly longer.

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Michael,

 

What is your question here? By 'terms' do you mean 'chances'? If so, the chances are likely that you'll be on an ILS to 22L, and that the approach will be to the (vertical) minimums for the CAT I. If you're assuming you're CAT II or III equipped, then I'd plan for the CAT II.

 

You'll have almost a 10 knot direct crosswind, and you'll also want to factor in the runway being damp, so your rollout might be slightly longer.

 

 

Thats why i always apreciate your answers here Kyle  :smile: Thanks

 

I will plan for a Cat II from ENGM but off cause ATC will properly guide me as well? I dont know the safety different in EKCH making it from CAT1 to 2 on the ground so CAT II it is.

 

But what about takeoff in the event i might leave the EKCH airport ? I forgot the rules here  :fool:

 

 

 

Ohh: how did you read the damp section on the metar ?

Michael Moe

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I forgot

 

How much different is it in the cockpit actually going from CAT 1 to CAT II . I know radio DH is in use but its still not an autoland so how different is it in real life ?

 

Thanks

 

Michael Moe 

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Thats why i always apreciate your answers here Kyle  :smile: Thanks

 

I will plan for a Cat II from ENGM but off cause ATC will properly guide me as well? I dont know the safety different in EKCH making it from CAT1 to 2 on the ground so CAT II it is.

 

But what about takeoff in the event i might leave the EKCH airport ? I forgot the rules here  :fool:

 

Ohh: how did you read the damp section on the metar ?

Michael Moe

 

You're welcome!

 

ATC will likely vector you, yes. The chart does show the full procedure off of the VOR, but this is only necessary if they don't vector you.

 

Takeoff rules are kinda tricky - and keep in mind, I'm answering from an FAA-perspective, and CPH is not FAA, obviously - but the basic idea is that you need to be able to have an instrument approach available for you to land with, so your landing mins are your takeoff mins. That is a very, very, very simplified answer, though. (EDIT: In reality, each operator submits their own OpSpec, and the administrator approves whatever minimum it believes is reasonable, given the operation, equipment, certifications, contingencies, and so on).

 

 

 

I'll break down the full METAR just in case you can learn more than just the 'damp' part:

EKCH 061520Z 14010KT 1100 R22L/P1500N R04L/P1500N R12/P1500N -DZ OVC002 11/11 Q1017 NOSIG

 

Airport: EKCH

Time: 0601520Z (06th day of month 1520Z)

Wind: 14010KT (140 degrees at 10 knots)

Visibility: 1100 metres

RVR: R22L/P1500N (Runway 22L Greater than 1500 metres, no change)

------- R04L/P1500N (Runway 04L Greater than 1500 metres, no change)

------- R12/P1500N (Runway 12 Greater than 1500 metres, no change)

Precip: -DZ (light drizzle - this is where I got that the runway would be damp)

Cloud coverage: OVC002 (overcast at 200' - this is where I got that the ILS would be at CAT I mins)

Temp/Dewpoint: 11/11 (this gives the reason for the low clouds/mist/fog/drizzle - no temp/dewpoint spread or "difference") 

Pressure: Q1017

Remarks: NOSIG (no significant changes over last 2 hour period)

 

 

 

As far as the approach goes, there is no real difference other than referring to the radio altimeter, instead of pressure altitude (your "regular" altimeter). It's more of a legal checkbox for the operator, and the airport (the operator must have the necessary equipment, and the ILS installation must be certified for it, etc).

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Hi, Michael,

 

I'm not at the office, so I don't have access to the most current Airport Information Procedures for EKCH. But, this information will provide you with some information necessary for a night departure out of EKCH using Runway 22R. These charts are expired, but they have the information needed for performing departures, both day and night.

 

http://www.fly-sea.com/charts/EKCH.pdf

 

Starting with Chart 10-1P through Chart 10-1P6

 

Specifically Sections:

 

1.2.3, 3.3, and 3.4

 

You will be assigned the SID in real world, but, in flight simming, you can select which SID you wish to follow following departure.

 

Then, look at the departure requirements contained in the SID used for departure for runway 22R.

 

Specifically:

 

Chart 10-3A, 10-3C, 10-3E, 10-3G, 10-3J, and 10-3M.

 

Chart 10-4 (For Noise Abatement)

 

For any departure, we have to have a minimum of 183m horizontal visibility.

 

-DZ (Light Drizzle) represents the potential for a wet runway.

 

How this helps.

 

Cheers,

 

Jim Wilkerson

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Thanks alot  :smile:

 

You answers is really apreciated

 

Thanks

 

Michael Moe 

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Hi

 

I am back with another foggy day at EKCH. In this METAR we also now have VV = vertical vicib.

 

Combined with all the other vicib. how do they fit in with RVR?

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/vjgygs2613ta6ph/Screenshot_2016-01-25-17-16-48.png?dl=0

 

 

Some is going for cat3 i can hear but also some is just planning for an ILS22L

 

Thanks Michael Moe

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Update

 

I found Kyles fantastic explanation ☺ in my earlier question a year ago. Sorry

 

 

 

Visibility comes in a few varieties:

Vertical visibility: this is indirectly reported as a the height of the lowest layer of overcast or broken clouds (AGL) - this is referred to as "ceiling."

Horizontal visibility: this is reported directly as a metric followed by SM (for statute miles - e.g. 10SM).

Runway visibility: this is directly reported when it's relevant (when less than 6000'), and is another horizontal vis metric, but is being recorded right at the runway (which is usually more accurate than the ASOS/AWOS location).

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