Sign in to follow this  
NWATech

Look at these B737 throttle-lever positions! (pic)

Recommended Posts

Help AVSIM continue to serve you!
Please donate today!

Engines are not identical, so depending on age and wear and other factors they may show slightly different parameters. The throttle levers are probably set like that to match thrust between them.-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are a few reasons for the discrepancies here. One would be that one of the engines is newer and developing more thrust in cruise while the older engine requires a higher throttle lever position to develop the same EPR. Another reason would be the engine trimming in where the fuel control is adjusted to bring the power levers into allignment. Another could be a mix of engines. Maybe a JT8D-9 with a -15. The gauge you refer to is the EGT and seeing that the rest of the parameters are normal, I would say the the #2 engine is nearing the end of its life or there is an engine mix installed on this aircraft. BTW, a half knob throttle split is not that uncommon for a JT8 engine installation.Cheers,JohnBoeing 727/737 & Lockheed C-130/L-100 Mechanichttp://www.precisionmanuals.com/images/forum/ng_driver.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another reason could also be throttle cable rig. Since there are cables running all the way from the throttle quadrant to the engine, through pulleys and bellcranks, it doesn't take much to throw off the settings. Back when I worked for a major US carrier, we got some planes from PanAm that were in bad shape, especially the 747s. The throttles would be all over the place when putting out equal power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last reason might be extreme crosswind. Using some differential thrust would keep the aircraft stable if control input alone were insufficient.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

< Last reason might be extreme crosswind. Using some differential thrust would keep the aircraft stable if control input alone were insufficient. >How did you come to this conclusion? :-rollA half knob split is within limits.First indication would be a eng. inter-mix, which there should be a placard above each eng. indicating stack and front and inside cover of the a/c log book showing the inter-mix type.Eng. F/F will tell the whole story. I can not see it in this pic though. #2 EGT appears a bit higher than #1, the other ind. appear matched. If the #2 eng has high fuel consumption, you will see higher EGT. Most likely a tired eng.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this