StewartH

Arezone soundset for the C441

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Even though this soundset is designed for the Carenado version of the C441, can this sound set be used satisfactorily with our Flysimware version?

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I'm not sure about their quality. I have bought the ArezOne sounds for the Carenado C377 and ended up only using two of their files to complement the Carenado sounds. I think the biggest problem was that the sound for the C337 front and rear engines came from the left and the right, which obviously shouldn't be an issue for the C441 :)

But it was still better than the Oovee sounds, where I got a refund from fspilotshop (thank you!) after telling them about the three problems I had (the third being that Oovee stopped providing support for the sound pack).

But I'd say: Try it. Even if the full ArezOne sounds for the Alabeo (not Carenado, even if they are close) C441 might not work out of the box, you might use some of them to improve your aircraft.

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Any soundset can theoretically be used by any FS aeroplane, because the audio for all FS aeroplanes works by listing the sound events for a particular aeroplane in a sound config file. The sound config file tells FS which sound to play for a specific event, i.e. you could have a trombone sound called 'flap sound' if you liked, and so long as your FS aeroplane's config file says to play the sound file called 'flap sound' when you lower the flaps in the sim, it would play that trombone sound. But...

A replacement set of audio files for a particular FS aeroplane will have all of its sound files named using the exact same file names as the ones in the original plane's sound folder which they are intended to replace. This is so you can just drop the replacement sounds into the aeroplane's sound folder (or alternatively use a different sound config file which points to the new sounds) and FS will then use those new ones instead of the original ones. So here's the problem: the FlySimWare C441's sound files have different names than the Alabeo C441, for example...

Here is what it says in the Alabeo C441's sound config file for the engine starter noise:

[starter]
filename=ALAC441start

And here is what it says in the FlySimWare C441's sound config file for the engine starter noise:

[starterA]
filename=TPE331strt

Now there is nothing stopping you from opening up the FSW C441's sound config file in Notepad and changing it all so that it points to a differently named audio file for a particular event (i.e. cranking the engine or whatever) so that the flight sim then plays that new sound instead of the original one, but you would have to know which sound was which in your replacement sound set, and without owning both the Alabeo 441 and the FSW 441, so that you could compare the two sound config files side by side, that might prove tricky to do. Of course you could also simply listen to the sounds and that would tell you what each one was for, but I think that'd be fairly tedious to do.

I do have both the Alabeo 441 and the FSW 441, so it would be comparitively easy for me to figure out which sound needed to be swapped for which by opening up both of their sound config files and checking out which sound file is for which event in the sim, but even then I think it would be a bit tedious to do. Unfortunately, since the config files are copyright, and I or anyone else can't redistribute them because of the EULA, I can't paste that text into here for you to make use of, which is annoying, but that is what the Alabeo EULA says.

So the short answer is yes, you could use those replacement sound files, but it wouldn't be a five minute installation job to do it.

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Oops, yes I meant Alabeo--memory lapse, I guess.  I understand fully the problem, Alan.  What you state is clearly not worth the hassle, so I'll stick with the original FSW soundset.  BTW, which version of the 441 do you prefer?  I'm not inclined to buy the Alabeo version, since I already the FSW version, which I find very satisfactory.

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You've got the best one if you've got the FlySimWare C441.

The Alabeo one is undeniably a prettier 3D model, with better texturing (apart from a small error in the avionics placard labelling). But the systems aren't as well simulated in the Alabeo one as they are in the FlySimWare one. They're not terribly inaccurate, but they are not as meticulous as they are in the FlySimWare one. If that was the only difference between the two, then the Alabeo one would have much to recommend it, but unfortunately, there are some errors on the Alabeo which make it difficult to recommend until they patch it.

The prop condition lever is reversed in operation, which means it exhibits appallingly bad ground handling and actually cannot be operated properly until they patch it. Something as obviously incorrect as that should have been spotted by beta testers. As noted, there is also a typo in the cockpit placarding, which I actually corrected on mine with a quick repaint of the VC panel texture; the placard on the left side panel next to the Ignition Override switches which should of course read 'Ignition Override', but on the alabeo C441, that placard actually says 'Ignition Overdrive'. It's a minor error of course, and anyone can make a typo, but it is nevertheless sloppy work which again should have been spotted by beta testers, since it is a system that a pilot will use to override automatic ignition when messing around with all the non-normal operations on that part of the panel, such as taking the props off their locks or whatever.

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Thank you for advice, Alan.  I'm quite satisfied with the FSW version.  The better texturing of the Alabeo version is not a concern for me.  They and Carenado spend far to much effort on eye candy and not enough in faithfully modeling the aircraft systems, imo.  But I'm spoiled by my A2A aircraft, I guess.

Another question if I may:  I don't quite follow you about the Ignition Override switches and how the relate to taking the props off their locks.  In releasing the start locks for the props, I've never had the occasion to activate the Ignition Override switches.  They aren't mentioned in the start-up checklist at any rate, so when are they engaged, just prior to the start locks procedure, or when exactly?

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Sorry for causing confusion, I had the power blow in my house when typing that bit of my previous post and when the power came back on and I fired up my browser, it 'restored' my post (actually I thought it was pretty cool that it did that, guess that must be courtesy of the updated Avsim site's more modern functionality), however I didn't notice that it had not restored part of what I typed, so I just hit 'save' lol, not realising it didn't make sense because of the bit which it omitted, I've corrected it, just to avoid confusing anyone else!

Anyway, the ignition override is not anything to do with the prop locks, I was just pointing out that it's on the same panel as the switches used to unlock the props. I don't know whether the simulation of the FSW'S engine ignition is fancy enough to have those switches actually do anything in the sim, or even if FS can have that function without some kind of fancy programming, but you can still use them anyway if you like I guess. What the Ignition Override switches are for (on the real aeroplane at least), is to stop the computer controlling the ignition (where it is timed with fuel going into the engine during the start sequence). The switches override the timing and instead have ignition operate continuously; so it'd work more like a model aeroplane engine's glowplug (i.e. on all the time) rather than like a spark plug (which fires a timed spark). I guess those switches might more logically be placarded with a sign reading 'Override Automatic Ignition And Have It On All The Time'. The reason you can do that is if you are in very heavy rainfall or going down a runway with a lot of standing water puddles, continuous ignition will help to prevent an engine from conking out if it gets hit by a lot of water. And the reason there are switches to allow you to do that, rather than that being how it works all the time, is because using continuous ignition for long periods causes wear on the parts, specifically, the igniter plugs (which are basically a bit like very posh car spark plugs, but a hell of a lot more expensive, as is always the case with aeroplane spares), so you're only supposed to use continuous ignition for brief periods.

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Thank you, Alan.  That all makes perfect sense.  I note the indicator lights above the switches illuminate briefly during the startup sequence, which seems to jibe with your explanation that there is a coordinated firing of the ignition plugs with input of the fuel.  FSW seems to have been careful in modeling this correctly, not to mention the entire startup sequence.  It's one of the reasons I really like this aircraft.  Their sound set, on the other hand, is strange when the aircraft is cruising, but I can overlook that.  Perhaps it's because the designers have modeled a different type of turboprop (I forget the exact model) than the usual PW PT6 most of us are used to hearing.  I dunno.

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