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Charts And Their Measurments

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Hello guys does anybody know the measurments of charts that real pilots use. what i mean is how many inches in lenght and with is the actual paper, and i can take it in metric system since i learned the metric system before i learned the american system.Best Regards Adib Afraj

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Hmmmm. Never thought about it before. It doesn't really matter to most people. They are all too big to leave unfolded, unless you are a navigator sitting at a navigator's station, and those are cramped, at best. Small plane drivers have to fold up their maps to be able to use them as their route unfolds, and to be able to use them again. Maps can get to be a real pain to keep folded and under control. Fighter and Recce Pukes glue their maps together, trim them up as needed, sometimes laminate them, and fold them into handy packages for a cramped cockpit. Some routes take several maps glued together. Then, you have the different scales for enroute, low level (visual and radar nav), and target area navigation. Add the IFR enroute charts and you have a heck of a lot of paper, and that doesn't include the aircraft forms, checklists, Aircrew Aids, and other supplements carried on many missions. Many maps get tossed out after one use. That would be too expensive for the average private pilot, though.So, what are the measurements of the different kinds of maps? I can measure a sectional and a Tactical Pilotage Chart for you, but I can't do it right now. There may be a web site with that stuff on it.Meanwhile, if you tell us why you need the information, maybe we can help you better.Regards - Steve

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The Sectional Charts used in the USA are about 20 inches by 59 inches. The Tactical Pilotage Chart, used mostly by the military, is about 41 1/2 inches by 57 1/2 inches. Both are 1:500,000 scale.Have Fun - Steve

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Two things help out a lot with charts in the cockpit:1) A clear plastic chart ruler, with scales for both sectional and WAC charts. Places like Sporty's sell these.2) A little trick I learned during my private pilot lessons: the radius of the VOR circles is about 20 miles...handy when you just need a rough estimate

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>2) A little trick I learned during my private pilot lessons:>the radius of the VOR circles is about 20 miles...handy when>you just need a rough estimateYou mean diameter.

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>>2) A little trick I learned during my private pilot>lessons:>>the radius of the VOR circles is about 20 miles...handy when>>you just need a rough estimate>>You mean diameter.Yes I do! Thanks for the correction :)

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>2) A little trick I learned during my private pilot lessons:>the (diameter) of the VOR circles is about 20 miles...handy when>you just need a rough estimateThat may be true in the USA, but the diameter is just under 10nm on the UK 1:250,000 charts.

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A better estimate is for a 1:500,000 scale chart.The average thumb from tip to first joint is 10nmThe average streched span from thumb tip to little finger tip is 60nmDouble for 1:1,000,000 scale and halve for 1:250,000 scale:)

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They're 10 mile rings around VORs on the Sectional Charts.----------------------------------------------------------------John MorganReal World: KGEG, UND Aerospace Spokane Satillite, Private ASEL 141.2 hrs, 314 landings, 46 inst. apprs.Virtual: MSFS 2004"There is a feeling about an airport that no other piece of ground can have. No matter what the name of the country on whose land it lies, an airport is a place you can see and touch that leads to a reality that can only be thought and felt." - The Bridge Across Forever: A Love Story by Richard Bach

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