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British History Question

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Hi all, this is really off topic, but I read that this is the forum for that.Anyway since there are a lot of people from the UK in these forums and being that I'm a history freak and it's black history month in America I thought I'd ask:If you don't know. America was a segregated nation until the mid 1960's, the struggle for civil rights is a huge part of American history. And my question is, did the UK ever have any civil rights issues between whites and blacks living in Britain, or even segregation? My step mom is British and I asked her a few years ago, but I can't remember what she said.Thanks,Jeff USAF

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I'm sure someone will correct me but as far as I know we never had the same level of discrimination here as you did in some parts of the US.

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"I'm sure someone will correct me but as far as I know we never had the same level of discrimination here as you did in some parts of the US."You are correct, there was nothing like the segregation or burning crosses here. Although the same can't be said for the present day.Dan.

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Not against other races; the discrimination here was against Roman Catholics. From the time that Henry VIII broke with Rome in the 1500's, through to the Roman Catholic Relief Act in 1829, Catholics were treated as second-class citizens to a greater or lesser extent. There weren't that many on the mainland, but given that the majority of people in Ireland were Catholics, that of course explains much of the so-called "Irish Troubles".

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No, she wasn't. Her mother was Ann Boleyn, and it was to marry Ann that Henry VIII broke with Rome and set up the Church of England. So Elizabeth was brought up a Protestant.However Elizabeth's half-sister, Mary, the daughter of Katherine of Aragon (who was divorced to make way for Ann Boleyn), was always a Catholic. When she reigned from 1553 to 1558, prior to Elizabeth, there was a brief 5-year period when Protestants would get burnt at the stake instead of Catholics.They weren't into "hearts and minds" in those days.:-(

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