tutmeister

yoke measurement favour please

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Hi all,
I'm being cheeky and after a favour please.....
If anyone is able to measure the full travel of whatever ga aircraft they have access to it would be greatly appreciated.
I'd like to know how far from the panel the yoke site when full forward and full aft plus what aircraft it was.
I'm unable to get to the airfield until after Christmas now so if there is anyone who can provide these it would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
Chris

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182RG....between 11" and 12" of travel....4-5" inches from the panel @ full-forward.  From memory from when I purchased a Redbird yoke...which is also 11" of travel.

Jim

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The Cessna 150/152 has about 14 inches of travel from smacking it against the panel stop to all the way back, and it does full aileron deflection at about ninety degrees over, but will actually move a bit further than that, not that moving it further achieves anything lol.

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Thanks guys, I’ve been googling and I keep finding people talking about yoke travel that seems a lot less than that like between 160 and 190mm. I guessed it was about 12” in the warrior I fly but like I said, I’m not able to get over there until after Christmas.

Chris

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I am certain that it is greater than 190mm on any Cessna or Piper aircraft I have flown. 12-14 inches of travel from forward stop to rear stop is much closer to reality. I will be able to measure a 172S and 182T later in the week.

Also agree with Chock that 180 degrees of rotation from left to right stop or 90 degrees either way from center is normal. There is a tiny bit of bonus travel on older airframes. :)

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I’m certain it is too! I don’t understand the numerous comments I’ve seen while googling yoke travel that state those sort of sizes, I mean, thats not even a bit out!

So the consensus so far is that at least 12” for most ga types.

Thanks for confirming guys.

Chris

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2 hours ago, Oracle427 said:

There is a tiny bit of bonus travel on older airframes. :)

It's almost certainly play in the cables and bellcranks and stuff which causes the extra movement. Not that I've ever flown any aeroplane which was new so it's pretty much the range of my experience to be piloting stuff which isn't in especially pristine condition. Frankly of all the real aeroplanes I've flown, most of them were right old bangers which have definitely seen better days, including one which had had its tail re-attached after a bad mishap (never really trusted that one), you could actually see where the tail had been fixed back on, there was a big raised line around the tailboom on the gel coat where it had been repaired and I was always a bit worried that it might decide to come apart again in the air. So I'm kind of used to things being a bit cack. In fact, the one time I flew a posh aeroplane with really nice controls which was fairly new (i.e. the floor wasn't covered in sh** and none of the control handles were worn and rattling and squeaking when you operated them etc), I actually didn't like it, because it felt weird to me to be in something which was actually nice lol.

I bet a brand new or completely refurbished Cessna 150 would not exhibit that kind of control wheel play, but since even the newest 150 is about 40 years old, it's hardly surprising the controls will be slack as a bag of spanners on most of them. It's no wonder you can buy one for ten grand these days lol.

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I have flown aircraft from about 82 years old to 9 years old. I agree that the older ones have a bit more play in their system, but I trust that they're all safe given that they must pass the same inspections. I also used to fly a 172 that had serious damage the tail with part of the horizontal stabilizer and elevator torn off in an incident. It it one of the better flying older 172s I've had the chance to fly. :)

I find the nosewheel steering or near lack thereof on the older airplanes to be the hardest part to get used to.

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I learned something new today. The travel isn't as much as I thought.

Measurement from vertical face of the panel to the backside of the vertical face of yoke where it attaches to the shaft.

182T 5" to 12" = 7" travel
172S 5.5" to 12" = 6.5" travel

If I applied some extra pressure forward or back I could get another .5" of travel, but I felt it would be most accurate to measure the actual travel stop to stop without accounting for the tension of control cables.

The data you already had was apparently very accurate! 

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Thanks for the update!

It seems everyone remembers it being longer than it actually is....yoke travel that is.

Chris

I think we are probably remembering how far the thing comes out of the panel rather than actual travel. I mean, how often do you go to full forward as opposed to full aft?

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