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ckyliu

turbine simulation

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Guest monsoon

Is the turboprops simulated properly this time around?

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Suppose it depends on the type of turboprop... I hear that single shafts are a pain in the arse to model in FS9 especially (Matthias Lieberecht has been trying for some time). Guess the the RR Dart would be a pain in FS9 too then. Hopefully they will have reworked the system for turboprop .air and .cfg in FSX, I mean how can you get lbf from a turboprop... we need shp.

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let's assume that this is true.now, ACES team must correct jet engines to change the thust unit from lbs to kN.why?is a international stardard and more precise value.i GUESS that nothing in this area will be changed.

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Bloody ####...I know there are hardcore simmers (and i think of myself as getting there) but you are talking hardcore hardcore simming here...I was kind of hoping they were going to simplify the fuel loading, with an 'add this amount of fuel' button in the flight plan..I'd give my left arm for a flight planner that inserted the right amount of fuel for me.. Steve

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>now, ACES team must correct jet engines to change the thust>unit from lbs to kN.>why?>is a international stardard and more precise value.>>i GUESS that nothing in this area will be changed.This is not the same thing... kN and lbf describe the same thing just in a different unit, just one is imperial and one metric. shp and lbf are not the same thing (they're both imperial). shp is shaft horsepower and measures power output from the shaft. lbf measures the pounds of force that a jet exhaust (or anything else for that matter) can exert - just like kN...It's nothing to do with international standards, its to do with how the power of turboprops is measured... which is in terms of power output rather than thrust output.

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Guest tdragger

If I had any idea what you were talking about I *might* hazard a guess.

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Guest Karybdis

EDIT: Nope, dont understand much of the above eitherI think the basic question is just whether the modelling of Turboprops in FSX is what some people called in FS9 "A suped up" version of another aircraft type, or truely a new aircraft type.Personally I didnt notice, but then again I've never piloted a turboprop.Course I could be wrong..

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Yeah, I think it refers to the fact that the throttle is way too sensitive to input in turboprops. I realize the sim is sensitive in general, but the turboprops are hard to control speed during final when a minute touch of the throttle dramatically effects the airspeed. I feel like a microneurosurgeon when flying them in FS9. ;)

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Guest Surge

>EDIT: Nope, dont understand much of the above either>>I think the basic question is just whether the modelling of>Turboprops in FSX is what some people called in FS9 "A suped>up" version of another aircraft type, or truely a new aircraft>type.Maybe it's best explained this way :How many pounds of thrust does the engine in your motor vehicle put out? That's right ... it doesn't put out any unless you want to measure the tiny fraction that comes out of the exhaust pipe. :DIt puts out horse power (or kW) which is (torque * RPM) / 5252Turbo prop engine outputs are measured in SHP (Shaft Horse Power).One may say that it's easy to convert the jet engine model's "lbs thrust" to SHP based on engine RPM but that's not so.If you're driving on the highway with your engine running at 3000 RPM how much power is the engine putting out? Yes, it all depends on the amount of throttle your using (uphill, flat, downhill).So what this boils down to is :With a jet engine model the amount of thrust is more or less tied directly to the RPM. High RPM = lots of thrust.With a turbo prop model the power output is dependent on the condition lever setting and propeller RPM and pitch and isn't tied directly to the turbine RPM.Yes both have turbine stages that will increase power based on RPM but the freewheeling nature of the propeller drive on the turbo prop is a totally different beast and needs totally different equations to model properly.I hope MS invest in a decent turbo prop engine model - I've been waiting since FS98 for one.Paul

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Finally someone comprehends - and not only that he explains it a lot better than I can. The turboprop model in FS is totally screwed up from a developers point of view (so I'm told and have heard), especially when FS tries to interfere with propellor pitch just because the RPM levers were shoved forward. Anyways judging by the responce doesn't sound like anything new is on the way here...--------------------------------------A couple of quotes maybe to help some FS people to understand the issue (This is related to the BAe Jetstream 31 and 41 panels and personally I don't understand everything that is being said). This guy has tried everything from dummy engines to fancy gauges and I think after 4 months of trying he's just given up! "Unfortunately I have to stop the work on the turboprop panels for a while. The reason is, that I still couldn't realize the engine controlling as it should be.""The problem is, that the aircraft should have absolutely no propulsion when the RPM lever is set to flight (96% N1) and the power lever, which I want to combine with the propeller pitch angle, is still on ground idle because of the zero pitch angle. And this is exactly the thing which does not work. As soon as RPM increases, Microsoft activates it's propeller governor and increases the pitch automatically. No matter in which position my power lever (pitch control) is. Because of this, the aircraft starts moving when it shouldn't. I was not able yet to eliminate the FS propeller governor (which does really very strange things with the pitch angle) and to let it control with an own programmed power lever. My goal is to control RPM (N1) with the RPM lever and the pitch angle, and so propulsion, with the power lever."

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