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Cessnaflyer

Videos on aircraft icing.

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Oh #### it's private ground school all over again! Let me guess the airplane is a twotter and there is a guy narrating with airplane models around him?

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>Oh #### it's private ground school all over again! Let me>guess the airplane is a twotter and there is a guy narrating>with airplane models around him?I've never seen them posted in the Hangar Chat, so I thought someone could be interested in them. Sorry if it bothers you.Marco

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I think he's probably just kidding. I had to watch those same videos for my instrument ground school last semester, and wouldn't be surprised if they come up again this semester in my commercial ground school.

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Doesn't bother me having them posted here. What I am referring to is that it is a running joke in the many ground schools I've taken that this video has been played so many times that the tape has worn thin.

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>Doesn't bother me having them posted here. What I am>referring to is that it is a running joke in the many ground>schools I've taken that this video has been played so many>times that the tape has worn thin.:) I think they should replace the guy with a blonde in bikini.

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you'll see it again in an airline ground school if you get a job at one......you'll also see the flying tigers CRM mess tape ("NDB?!?! Why that sonofa.....")

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Is that the one on the western pacific somewhere where the pilots fly the wrong approach and descend to low? I don't remember all the details of that video.

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Marco,These two videos contain valuable information.Professional pilots who fly aircraft with limited performance quickly learn to have a healthy respect for airframe icing or they aren't around for long. This is especially true for pilots must fly through the weather because their aircraft aren't capable of flying above it.I've had my share of icing encounters flying freight and being able to apply the information contained in these videos might just save a pilot's bacon someday, assuming they were paying attention.John

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>Is that the one on the western pacific somewhere where the>pilots fly the wrong approach and descend to low? I don't>remember all the details of that video.yes. the CA basically set the approach up wrong. the FO, pilot flying, argued with him about the frequency, etc but still descended when the controller, using improper phraseology told them to descend to 2400'. they went to 400' and impacted the side of the mountain. they had originally set up for an ils, but when tower told them to expect the ndb, the FO stated, "NDB?!?! Why that sonofab!@#%!"the phraseology should have been "descend and maintain two thousand, four hundred feet", but instead was "descend to two-four-zero-zero feet". the pilots took the two as a to and went down to 400'. they then ignored the 45 seconds of GPWS warnings.

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>Professional pilots who fly aircraft with limited performance>quickly learn to have a healthy respect for airframe icing or>they aren't around for long. This is especially true for>pilots must fly through the weather because their aircraft>aren't capable of flying above it.>>I've had my share of icing encounters flying freight and being>able to apply the information contained in these videos might>just save a pilot's bacon someday, assuming they were paying>attention.amen to that. the greatest "icing" tools in a recip cockpit (other than boots, etc) are:the prop levers - a quick cycle quickly sheds any ice on the propsairspeed bug - with a set power you should have a reasonable airspeed. a bug will let you know if this is not true.the thing that saves a lot of people in ice conditions is simply hand flying the airplane. a lot of the icing accidents may have been differently if the plane was hand flown instead of using an autopilot.

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I agree about cycling the prop to shed ice. It often works better that a "hot" prop.Autopilots can be problematic in icing. I don't want the A/P to trim me into an (accelerated) stall while I'm distracted, but I may need the A/P to help manage the aircraft if I'm flying single pilot so I can monitor the ice accumulation, use the radar, talk to ATC, monitor the OAT, etc. So I use the A/P if I need it, but I watch that elevator trim for excessive pitch up movement.I've watched many pilots gloss over the preflight briefing just before launching into known moderate icing. PIREPs, forecast winds and temperatures aloft and the Forecast Icing Potential data on the ADDS weather page are key to knowing where you might be able to escape icing should you encounter it on your planned route.You're right on the money about needing to make a note of your indicated airspeed when you first start to collect ice in a recip or turboprop flying through the weather. You also need to know how much of a decrease in airspeed you can accept for your aircraft type before you'll need to implement your escape plan, assuming you had the foresight to develop an escape plan.Weather is one of those subjects that is boring to read about and study in a classroom. Once you see weather in action, your appreciation for the information in those boring videos and books will be renewed.John

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Yeah a lot of people here at school use the "up to..." phrase and it is quickly corrected upon by this video.

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