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Guest grimmy69

Oxygen Switch

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Hi!Here's another gauge I would like to try to create. I have a gauge that controls a simple animation of an oxygen system. I would like to make it a bit more than an animation.First, I would like to add a switch to turn it on and off. Reading the FAQ I believe a switch can connect to the "L:"-statement in the gauge I am using:"(P:Absolute time, seconds) 4 % 2 > if{ 1 (> L:OXFLOW, bool) } els{ 0 (> L:OXFLOW, bool) } (L:OXFLOW, bool)"Secondly, if possible I would like to trigger the blackout effect if the oxygen system isn't enabled above a certain altitude.Does anyone have any ideas on how to accomplish this?Best,Roger

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For the blackout, I was thinking of a second gauge that checks if the oxygen system is enabled. If not, and the aircraft is above a certain altitude, then the blackout effect would be triggered. However, I am uncertain if there is a standard "black out" effect that is accessible to the gauges or if it is possible to make the screen dark some other way.

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Another idea for the blackout when the oxygen system isn't on...I guess the blackout effect is connected to the G-forces on the aircraft. Would it be possible to fool the sim into thinking that the G-forces are strong enough for a blackout by creating a gauge?The backside I assume, would be that it would effect the aircraft too.Would anyone be interested in discussing this?Thanks,Roger

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HiOr maybe you could use the (>K:AILERON_SET) (>K:ELEVATOR_SET) so the aircraft becomes uncontrolable?CheersWozza

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Roger,The "blackout" function is coupled to the current "Gforce".Can be switchon/off in the menu Realism settings (option "G-effects"), but the values at which "blackout" occurs (positive and negative G) are fixed values in FS.Rob

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Wozza, Making the aircraft uncontrollable might be a good thing to add, but primarily, I want to make it possible for the pilot to react to the imminent blackout and switch on the oxygen system before it happens.Rob, does this mean it is impossible to fool the simulator into believing that the G-force value is higher? The idea was that a hidden gauge would "push" a high G-force value at certain altituds, if the oxygen switch isn't on, thereby fooling the simulator into turning the screen black. Still, it might not be a good idea, since I think it would affect the aircraft aswell and maybe break it into tiny little pieces...Any ideas on how to create a switch that starts and stops the animation mentioned above? Is it at all possible?Thanks,Roger

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Just an idea for at least manipulating the animation. Would it be possible to put another "image" on top of the oxygen flow indicator that is dark when the switch is off and becomes transparent if the switch is on, thereby revealing the underlying oxygen flow animation?If so, how would would I go about making the two gauges, where a switch hides/reveals the other image?Also, would it be possible to add a third gauge that triggers a blackout/aircraft uncontrollable effect if the switch isn't on?Thanks,Roger

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Did you ever get anywhere on this? I don't think an aircraft uncontrollable effect would be appropriate, as that is not what happens. What I am thinking is that an effect could be created, triggered by the gauge. It must be fairly doable, people make effects all the time like smoke, etc. It would start getting dark around the edges of the screen and keep creeping in over the next few minutes to fill the whole screen, and at the end, do a building crash or something.Thomas

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And don't forget the amount of oxygen in the tanks. I can imagine that the gauge tracks how much oxygen is used while the system is on (I saw this capability mentioned in another thread) and saves the amount between flights. And there must be a facility in the gauge to recharge the tanks that only works when the plane is on the ground. If the pilot forgets to recharge the tanks, oops, it may run out :-)Thomas

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BTW, apparently somebody modeled a Meridian with a complete oxygen system in it.

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Hi,Could be tried using a gauge with a bunch of elements, starting n at 0.9 up to 0 (dark) and using the color wished (red, black, etc). Regards,Tom

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Hi,I have a simple oxygen system:If Cabin Altitude rises above 10000 ft. oxygen goes on (automatically, but on demand is possible).Then you need to descend below 12000 ft.If you don't make it before oxygen is depleted failures occur.When back on the ground or when starting the sim the oxygen cylinders are refilled. The logic of my gauge isManual release of oxygen:(L:oxy,enum) 0 == if{ 1 (>L:oxy,enum) } els{ 0 (>L:oxy,enum) } Automatic release and refill:(L:oxygen system,enum) 0 == if{ 4000 (>L:oxygen cylinders,number) 1 (>L:oxygen system,enum) } (A:SIM ON GROUND,bool) (L:oxygen cylinders,number) 4000 < and if{ 4000 (>L:oxygen cylinders,number) } els{ 0 }(L:Cabin Altitude,feet) 10000 > (L:oxy,enum) 1 == | if{ (L:oxygen cylinders,number) 1 - 0 max (>L:oxygen cylinders,number) } (L:oxygen cylinders,number) 0 == (A:Indicated Altitude, feet) 12000 > and if{ FAILURE }Don't mind Cabin altitude, is from the pressurization system.FAILURE can be anything what you want.For example a Polygon becoming more black and vanishing below 12000 ft.Imagination is the limit.Jan"Beatus Ille Procul Negotiis"

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hmm, found this from a referance to a post i did on this subject.i made a a series of gauges to control this exact thing.an o2 gauge that spends oxygen when turned on at a rate dependednt on altitude and time. another gauge called pysiology, works in the background, it reads g force and time under stress and converts it to a health lvar.the greater the health lvar value the worse shape the pilot is in.the lvar is given a value dependent on the stress ( amount of G, or altitude without O2) which keeps adding up ( each gauge cycle) over time. the health value recovers at a rate determinned by the lack of stress, ( reduced g, availability of 02) which subtracts from the health value over time and allows recovery.another gauge, blackout animates the results, based on the health variable.i was/am looking for a really nice blackout effect. i do not do effects, and currently use a series of bitmaps in a gauge.( 1024x768 ) that are transparent except for monochrome noise. #1 is slight, #2 slightly more #3 more etc. to look good it takes 10 bitmaps with ever increasing imparement to vision. through a stupid amount of trial and error i sincrinized it to the fs9 blackout. there is no way i know to call up the fs9 blackout and lack of o2 or loss of cabin pressure effects are only reprsented by my gauge with no help from flight sim. since my panel is a military fighter, i have the mask breathing sound of the pilot playing when ever the o2 switch is turned on. i also added changes in breathing speed, higher at the onset of stress, (graduual loss of available o2 or g-force above 2 g.) then the breathing slows dramatically with the addition of greater stress.also at some point i added a heart beat sound effect that slows as stress mounts. the result is pretty cool, and a quirk of truncated breathing waves is that it sounds like gasps, with a big gasp upon return to normal...pretty cool. i am currently searchinng for groan waves, for the total black out or NAP point and for negative g-effects which are much more unpleasent and come on quicker...nobody pushes! my panel has lookdown and side views, to prevent escape from the effect i use doug dawson window status gauge to open the effects window no matter where you look. there is no real recovery for loss of cabin pressure at altitude except get lower fast. forgetting to turn your o2 starts to hit you at 14 k with increased breathing and slightly impared vision, easy enough to find and flip the o2 switch.

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